MIT Sloan Action Learning
GO-Lab
GO-Lab

GO-Lab Faculty

Donald Lessard

Donald Lessard

EPOCH Foundation Professor of International Management, Emeritus Professor of Global Economics and Management, Emeritus
Professor of Engineering Systems, Emeritus
Contact Information
Office: E62-460
Tel: (617) 253-6688
Fax: (617) 253-2660
E-mail: dlessard@mit.edu
Support Staff

Name: Sumaiya Rahman
Tel: (617) 253-6679
E-mail: sumaiyar@mit.edu

Group(s)

Global Economics and Management

Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management

General Expertise

Alternative energy; Clean energy; Corporate strategy and policy; Gas; Globalization; International corporate strategy; International corporate strategy; International finance; International management; Oil; Project management; Risk management; Risk management

Biography

Donald R. Lessard is the Epoch Foundation Professor of International Management, Emeritus at the MIT Sloan School of Management. His research interests are in global strategic management and project management, focused on the energy sector, with an emphasis on managing in the face of uncertainty and risk.

He has published extensively on these topics in academic and professional journals, and is co-author of Strategic Management of Large Engineering Projects: Shaping Institutions, Risks, and Governance (MIT Press 2001 with Roger Miller).

A member of the MIT faculty since 1973, Lessard has served as Deputy Dean of the Sloan School with responsibilities for research, international programs, and executive education; co-chair of the Energy Education Task Force that launched an Institute-wide undergraduate energy minor; and founding director of the MIT Executive MBA, the BP Projects and Engineering Academy, and the Li and Fung Executive Development Program. He also led the MIT-Merrill Lynch Partnership, MIT’s first large-scale collaboration with a financial services firm.

A leader in international management education, Lessard is a past President of the Academy of International Business and Dean of the Fellows of the Academy. He is a Senior Fellow of the Fung Global Institute, a think tank based in Hong Kong. A senior advisor to the Brattle Group, he has led major consulting assignments with firms, banks, and government agencies throughout the world.

Lessard earned his BA in Latin American studies and his MBA and PhD in business administration from Stanford University.

Full curriculum vitae

Website

Publications

Strategic partnering in oil and gas: a capabilities perspective (2014)

The Evolution of EMNCS and EMNC Thinking: A Capabilities Perspective (2013)

Building Your Company’s Capabilities Through Global Expansion (2013)

Uncertainty and Risk in Global Supply Chains (2013)

Embracing risk as a core competence: The case of CEMEX (2009)

Mexican Multinationals: Insights from CEMEX (2008)

Real Asset Valuation: A Back-to-basics Approach. (2008)

“Frameworks for Global Strategic Analysis," Journal of Strategic Managment Education, 1(1). (2003)

“Risk and the Dynamics of Globalization,” in Birkinshaw, Markides, Stopford, and Yip, eds., The Future of the Multinational Company (Chichester, England: Wiley). (2003)

Strategic Management of Large Engineering Projects: Shaping Institutions, Risks, and Governance (MIT Press, 2001)

Capital Flight: The Problem and Policy Responses. Washington, D.C.: Institute for International Economics, 1987.

International Financing for Developing Countries : The Unfulfilled Promise/Wp0783 (World Bank Staff Working Papers, No 783). Washington, D.C.: World Bank, 1986.

Financial Intermediation Beyond the Debt Crisis (Policy Analyses in International Economics, No 12, September 1985). Washington, D.C.: Institute for International Economics, 1985

International Financial Management: Theory and Practice. New York, NY: Wiley, 1985.

Control of Indirect Financial Subsidies in Canada's Budget: Diagnosis and Recommendations (1982)

Currency Changes and Management Control: A Note on the Integration of the International Controller's and Treasurer's Functions (1974)

Emilio Castilla

Emilio Castilla

NTU Professor of Management
Professor
Contact Information
Office: E62-332
Tel: (617) 253-0286
Fax: (617) 253-2660
E-mail: ecastilla@mit.edu
Support Staff

Name: Patricia Curley
Tel: (617) 253-5701
E-mail: pcurley@mit.edu

Group(s)

Work and Organization Studies

General Expertise

Benefits; Benefits; B-school; Business school; Career development; Changing work environments; Changing work environments; Changing workforce; Compensation; Compensation; Conflict resolution; Consulting; Corporate incentives; Cultural differences; Customer incentives; Data analytics; Discrimination; Diversity; Education; Employee motivation; Employee termination; Employment relations; Employment relations; Family issues; Future of work; Future of work; Gender issues; Gender issues; Hiring; Incentives; Industrial relations; Industrial relations; Labor market policy; Labor relations; Managing change; Managing diversity; Motivation; Motivation; Organizational behavior; Organizational change; Organizational culture; Organizational design and performance; Organizational studies; Organizations; Predictive analytics; Race relations; Recruitment; Social networks; Social networks; Sociology; Sociology; Statistics; Training; Training programs; Turnover; Unemployment; Work / family issues

Biography

Emilio J. Castilla is the NTU Professor of Management and Professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

Castilla studies how social networks influence organizational and employment processes and outcomes over time. He tackles this question by examining different empirical settings with longitudinal datasets, both at the individual and organizational levels. His focus is on the hiring, retention, and job mobility of employees within and across organizations and locations, as well as on the impact of teamwork and social relations on performance. His research and teaching interests include organizational theory and behavior, economic sociology, and human resources management.

Castilla joined the MIT Sloan faculty in 2005, after being a faculty member for three years in the management department of the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a member of the Institute for Work and Employment Research at MIT, as well as a Research Fellow at the Wharton Financial Institutions Center and at the Center for Human Resources at the Wharton School.

Castilla holds a Graduate Diploma in business from Lancaster University, UK; a BA in economics from Universitat de Barcelona; and a PhD in sociology from Stanford University.

Website

Publications

The Paradox of Meritocracy in Organizations.Administrative Science Quarterly.(2010)

Gender, Race, and Meritocracy in Organizational Careers.American Journal of Sociology(2008)

Dynamic Analysis in the Social Sciences.Academic Press & Elsevier (2007)

Social Networks and Employee Performance in a Call Center.American Journal of Sociology(2005)

View a complete list of publications (PDF)
Charles Fine

Charles Fine

Chrysler Leaders for Global Operations Professor of Management
Professor of Operations Management and Engineering Systems
Co-Director, International Motor Vehicle Program
Contact Information
Office: E62-466
Tel: (617) 253-3632
Fax: (617) 258-7579
E-mail: charley@mit.edu
Support Staff

Name: David V Merrill
Tel: (617) 253-3341
E-mail: dvm@mit.edu

Group(s)

Operations Management
System Dynamics

Research Center(s)

Operations Research Center
The MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy

General Expertise

Automotive industry; Business process modeling; Entrepreneurial management; India; Innovation management; Innovative thinking; Manufacturing education; Manufacturing management; Manufacturing systems; Operations management; Process control; Production; Productivity; Social entrepreneurship; Supply chain management; Sustainability; Total Quality Management (TQM)

Biography

Charles Fine is the Chrysler Leaders for Global Operations Professor of Management, a Professor of Operations Management and Engineering Systems, and the Co-Director of the International Motor Vehicle Program at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

His research focuses on supply chain strategy and value chain roadmapping, with a particular focus on fast-clockspeed manufacturing industries. Fine’s work has supported design and improvement of supply chain relationships for companies in electronics, automotive, aerospace, communications, and consumer products. His current research examines outsourcing dynamics, with a focus on dynamic models for assessing the leverage among the various components in complex industrial value chains and the principles for value chain design, based on strategic and logistical assessments.

At MIT Sloan, he teaches Operations Strategy and Supply Chain Management and directs the roadmapping activities in the Communications Futures Program. Fine teaches and consults widely with such clients as 3M, Accenture, Agile Software, Alcan, BellSouth, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bombardier, Caterpillar, Chrysler, Delphi Automotive, Deutsche Bank Alex Brown, Embraer, Fluor, GE, GM, Goodyear, HP, Honeywell, Intel, Kodak, Lucent, Mercury Computer, Merrill Lynch, Motorola, NCR, Nokia, Nortel, Oracle, Polaroid, PTC, Research-in-Motion, Rolls-Royce, Sematech, Teradyne, Toyota, TRW, Unilever, Volkswagen, Volvo, and Walsin Lihwa. He also serves on the board of directors for Greenfuel Technologies Corporation, a biotechnology company that he co-founded, which focuses on renewable energy. Fine also serves as co-director of an executive education program, Driving Strategic Innovation, which is a joint venture between MIT Sloan and IMD in Lausanne, Switzerland.

He is the author of Clockspeed: Winning Industry Control in the Age of Temporary Advantage (Perseus Books, 1998). His work on quality management, flexible manufacturing, supply chain management, and operations strategy has appeared in a variety of publications, including Management Science, Operations Research, Journal of Manufacturing and Operations Management, Production and Operations Management, Annals of Operations Research, Games and Economic Behavior, Sloan Management Review, Supply Chain Management Review, and Interfaces.

Fine holds an AB in mathematics and management science from Duke University as well as an MS in operations research and a PhD in business administration from Stanford University.

Website

Publications

Clockspeed: Winning Industry Control in the Age of Temporary Advantage. Reading, Massachusetts: Perseus Books, 1998.

View a complete list of publications (PDF)
John Grant

John Grant

Senior Lecturer, International Action Learning Programs
(G-Lab, China/India Lab, GO-Lab)
Contact Information
Office: E62-421
Tel: (617) 324-4373
E-mail: jcgrant@mit.edu
Support Staff

Name: Sumaiya Rahman
Tel: (617) 253-6679
E-mail: sumaiyar@mit.edu

Group(s)

Global Economics and Management

General Expertise

Action learning; Asia; Biopharmaceutical; Biotechnology; China; Competitive strategy; Corporate diversification; Corporate finance; Corporate finance; Corporate strategy and policy; Cross-cultural awareness; Forecasting; France; Germany; Global business practices; Global business processes; Global entrepreneurship; Global entrepreneurship; Healthcare; India; International corporate strategy; International corporate strategy; International finance; International management; Japan; Medical devices; Medical devices; Mergers and acquisitions; New venture development; Performance measurement systems; Pharmaceuticals; Southeast Asia; Strategic management; Strategic planning; Strategy; Taiwan; United Kingdom; United States; Valuation; Valuation; Vietnam

Biography

John Grant is a Senior Lecturer in Global Economics and Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management. His focus is in the domains of global strategy, corporate finance and valuation, entrepreneurship, and strategic management.

Mr. Grant is a member of the teaching team for the MBA course 15.225 - Economy and Business in Modern China and India, where he is the Associate Course Lead. He is responsible for overseeing the 30+ student consulting projects each year that are a component of the course.

In addition, Mr. Grant is a mentor in several of MIT Sloan’s International Action Learning Programs: Global Entrepreneurship Lab, China Lab, India Lab, Enterprise Management Lab, and Global Organization Lab. He has mentored teams supporting companies in East & Southeast Asia, Australia, the Middle East, Europe, and South America, in addition to the U.S. Company issues have involved business strategy development, operations management, new market entry, global organization, and integrated strategic management.

Mr. Grant’s management interests are the result of over 30 years’ experience as a global strategic management consultant. He has worked on six continents with organizations ranging from startups to the world’s largest and most complex multinational companies.

Mr. Grant has been a principal in three leading strategy consulting firms, managing consulting practices in Europe, Asia, and North America. He has also been involved in the startup of new ventures in healthcare, energy services, and biotechnology, and has held the positions of chief operating officer and chief financial officer.

Mr. Grant holds a BS in applied mathematics from the University of Washington and an SM in management (finance concentration) from the MIT Sloan School of Management.

Charles Kane

Charles Kane

Senior Lecturer
Contact Information
Office: E62-421
Tel: (617) 258-6573
Fax: (617) 452-3172
E-mail: ckane@mit.edu
Support Staff

Name: Michelle Fiorenza
Tel: (617) 253-9455
E-mail: fiorenza@mit.edu

Group(s)

Global Economics and Management
Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management

General Expertise

Charles Kane is a Senior Lecturer in Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Strategic Management Goup and also in the Global Economics and Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

Kane is currently chairman of the One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Foundation and was formerly the president of OLPC, a nonprofit organization that provides technology to enhance education in less developed countries. Prior to OLPC, Kane was a founding investor and CFO of Global BPO Services Corp., a Special Purpose Acquisition Corp. that acquired Stream Global Services.

Prior to Global BPO, Kane was the CFO of RSA Security (acquired by EMC); CFO of Aspen Technology; president and CEO of Corechange, Inc. (acquired by Open Text Corp.); and CFO of Informix Software (acquired by IBM). He has also served in financial executive positions at Stratus Computer, Prime Computer, and Deloitte.

Throughout his career, Kane has been involved in developing and executing sophisticated financial strategies in globalizing corporations and mergers and acquisitions. He is a frequent speaker and writer on these topics, as well as other international financial topics and social entrepreneurial ventures. Kane is the audit chairman on the boards of Progress Software (PRGS); Carbonite (CARB); Demandware (DWRE); RealPage (RP); and Photobox LTD.

He also served on the Boards of Applix (acquired by IBM); Borland Software (acquired by Micro Focus LTD; and Netezza Corp (acquired by IBM). Kane is also on the Board and a founding member of the Hult Global Challenge which is now part of the Clinton Global Initiative. He is a certified public accountant and has taught international finance at the business schools of Boston College and Babson College. Kane is the coauthor of the book Learning to Change the World—the Social Impact of One Laptop per Child.

Kane holds a BBA in accounting from the University of Notre Dame and an MBA in international finance from Babson College.

Janice Klein

Janice Klein

Senior Lecturer, Organizational Change
Contact Information
Office: E40-393
Tel: (617) 253-8587
Fax: (617) 253-1462
E-mail: jklein@mit.edu
Group(s)

Operations Management

General Expertise

Change management; Changing work environment; Employee motivation; Engineering management; Human resources; Leadership; Managing change; Operations management; Organizational change; Organizational culture; Organizational design and performance; Teams; Virtual teams and organizations

Biography

Janice Klein is a Senior Lecturer in Organizational Change at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

Klein currently teaches leadership in the Leaders for Global Operations (LGO) and System and Design Management (SDM) programs. Her recent research, summarized in True Change: How Outsiders on the Inside Get Things Done in Organizations (Jossey-Bass, 2004), explores knowledge transfer and the application of new ideas and concepts at the workplace. In addition, she leads a multidisciplinary research team investigating virtual collaboration and the development and maintenance of high-performance globally dispersed teams. Klein’s earlier research has focused on aligning operations and human resource strategies in the areas of job design, team leadership, employee empowerment, and organizational change.

She is a graduate of General Electric Company’s Manufacturing Management Program. During her years at GE (1972–1981), she held various manufacturing and human resource management positions. In addition, she coordinated several organizational change efforts aimed at increasing employee involvement. Klein has consulted on teams and organizational change with United Technologies, Xerox, Hewlett-Packard, and Goodyear. Her publications include, “Why Supervisors Resist Employee Involvement” (Harvard Business Review, August/September 1984), “The Human Costs of Manufacturing Reform” (Harvard Business Review, March/April, 1989), and “Job Design” (The Handbook of Technology Management, 1998). Her textbook, Revitalizing Manufacturing: Text and Cases (Homewood, IL: Richard D. Irwin, Inc., 1990), focuses on the implementation of new manufacturing systems and technologies.

Klein holds a BS in industrial engineering from Iowa State University, an MBA from Boston University, and a PhD in industrial relations from the MIT Sloan School of Management.

Publications

True Change: How Outsiders on the Inside Get Things Done in Organizations. Jossey-Bass, 2004.

The American Edge : Leveraging Manufacturing's Hidden Assets. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1993.

Revitalizing Manufacturing : Text and Cases. Homewood, IL.: Irwin, 1990.

Christopher Noe

Christopher Noe

Senior Lecturer, Accounting
Contact Information
Office: E62-681
Tel: (617) 253-4903
Fax: (617) 253-0603
E-mail: chrisnoe@mit.edu
Support Staff

Name: Cassie Reddick
Tel: (617) 715-4178
E-mail: creddick@mit.edu

Name: Jackie Donnelly
Tel: (617) 324-1198
E-mail: jdonn@mit.edu

Name: Nancy Leonelli
Tel: (617) 253-6130
E-mail: leonelli@mit.edu

Group(s)

Accounting

General Expertise

Accounting; Accounting fraud; Accounting standards; Bankruptcy; Corporate disclosure practices; Earnings manipulation; Financial reporting; Forecasting; Valuation

Biography

Christopher Noe is a Senior Lecturer in Accounting at the Sloan School of Management.

Noe specializes in the fields of financial accounting and corporate finance. Immediately prior to joining the faculty at MIT Sloan, Noe was a vice president at Charles River Associates, an economics consulting firm. His work at CRA included valuation of business enterprises, financial securities, and specific assets/liabilities; financial statement analysis; examination of accounting restatements; solvency assessment; and damages estimation. Noe has published on topics such as voluntary disclosures and insider transactions, analyst specialization and stock breakups, and stock return volatility.

Noe holds a BA in economics from Emory University, an MS in applied economics and a PhD in business administration from the University of Rochester.

Full curriculum vitae

Working Papers

Publications

The Sale of the Washington Redskins: Discounted Cash Flow Valuation of S-Corporations, Treatment of Personal Taxes, and Implications for Litigation (2005)

Analyst Specialization and Conglomerate Stock Breakups (2001)

Disclosure Quality, Institutional Investors, and Stock Return Volatility (2000)

Voluntary Disclosures and Insider Transactions (1999)

Henry Weil

Henry Weil

Senior Lecturer, Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management
Contact Information
Office: E62-423
Tel: (617) 258-6101
Fax: (617) 253-2660
E-mail: hbweil@mit.edu
Support Staff

Name: Sumaiya Rahman
Tel: (617) 253-6679
E-mail: sumaiyar@mit.edu

Group(s)

Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management

General Expertise

Airlines; Alliances; Asia; Aviation; Banking; Bermuda; Business process modeling; Capital budgeting; China; Competition; Competition; Competitive strategy; Computer industry; Consumer behavior; Convergence; Corporate strategy and policy; Credit card industry; Customer relationships; Customer service; Data acquisition; Digitalization; Dot-com; eCommerce; Electronic media; Emerging businesses; Emerging markets; Energy; Entrepreneurial management; Ethanol; Europe; European Union (EU); Financial services; France; Globalization; Hong Kong; Industrial economics; Information technology; Innovation; International corporate strategy; International management; Internet telephony; Lead users; Management of technology; Marketing strategy; Media; Microeconomics; Mobile computing; New ventures; Nonlinear dynamics; Oil; Online banking; Online media; Pharmaceuticals; Pricing; Research and development; Retirement planning; Singapore; Startups / Start-ups; Strategic management; Strategic planning; System dynamics; Taiwan; Technological innovation; Technological strategy; Technological transfer; Trust-based marketing; Wi-Fi; Wireless communication

Biography

Henry Weil is a Senior Lecturer of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

Weil served as president and chief executive officer of Cambridge-based management consulting firm Pugh-Roberts Associates before bringing his considerable knowledge of corporate strategy in technology industries to MIT Sloan. He is particularly expert in telecommunications, financial services, transportation, energy, and the media. His research delves into the effects of management policies, technological developments, industry structure, and regulation on corporate competitiveness and market behavior. Weil is currently looking at the commoditization of air transportation, telecommunications services, and refined petroleum products. He uses computer simulation modeling to analyze the dynamics of market development, competition, and long-term profitability.

Weil holds an SB and an SM in management from MIT.

Publications

“Application of System Dynamics to Corporate Strategy: An Evolution of Issues and Frameworks,” System Dynamics Review, Vol. 23, Issue 2-3, pp. 137-156, October 2007.

“Dynamics of Social Factors in Technological Substitution,” (with B. Dattée), Technological Forecasting & Social Change, Vol. 74, June 2007, pp. 579-607.

“The Dynamics of Innovative Industries,” (with J. M. Utterback), proceedings of the 23rd International Conference of the System Dynamics Society, Boston, July 2005.

“The Road from Dependency to Empowerment: The Destination is Worth the Journey” (with E. E. Weil), Sloan School of Management Working Paper #4102, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, August 1999; also in eBusiness Research@MIT, Volume 1, Issue 1, December 2001.

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