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  • Cambridge: MIT Entrepreneurship Anniversary

    Celebrating A Half Century of MIT Entrepreneurship
    Date: Friday, November 11 and Saturday, November 12, 2016 

    For over 50 years, entrepreneurial research, education, and practice have flourished at MIT.

  • ONLINE REGISTRATION

    Contact: For questions regarding the event or registration, please contact us at sloaneventrsvp@mit.edu.



    Friday, November 11



    6:00 p.m.


    The Impact of MIT on Entrepreneurship Research Welcome Dinner
    Welcomes: David Schmittlein, Edward Roberts, Fiona Murray, and Scott Stern
    Featured Speaker: Simon Johnson

     

    Saturday, November 12



    8:00 a.m.


    Registration, Breakfast & Demo Booths


    8:45 a.m.


    Morning Sessions: The Impact on Entrepreneurship Research Welcome  

    9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

    Session 1: MIT as a Laboratory for Studying

    10:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

    Refreshment Break & Demo Booths

    10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

    Session 2: MIT Research Approaches to Entrepreneurship

    11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

    Session 3: MIT Entrepreneurship Research Influences Upon Policy

    12:45 p.m.

    Afternoon Sessions: Building the MIT Entrepreneurship Program — The Early Years

    12:55 p.m.

    Luncheon: On the Shoulders of Giants - The New Faces of MIT Entrepreneurship

    2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

    Session 1: Internal Development of MIT Entrepreneurship

    3:15 - 4:15 p.m.

    Session 2: Extending MIT Entrepreneurship to the Rest of the World

    4:15 - 4:45 p.m.

    Refreshment Break & Demo Booths

    4:45 - 5:45 p.m.

    Session 3: Accelerating Entrepreneurial Growth and Development

    5:45 p.m.

    Closing Remarks

    6:00 p.m.

    Cocktail Reception & Demo Booths

    6:30 p.m.

    Celebratory Dinner: An Evening Honoring Edward Roberts

     

    Friday, November 11: Welcome Dinner

    David Schmittlein

    David SchmittleinDavid Schmittlein is the John C Head III Dean and Professor of Marketing at the MIT Sloan School of Management. His focus has been to broaden MIT Sloan’s global visibility, to work with the faculty in creating new high-quality management education programs, to develop enhanced educational opportunities for current students, and to develop and disseminate business knowledge that has impact and that will stand the test of time. He also has reached out to the many members of MIT’s alumni community to gain their valuable insights on MIT Sloan and management education.

    Prior to his appointment at MIT Sloan, Schmittlein was the Ira A. Lipman Professor and Professor of Marketing at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania from 1980 until 2007. He also served as Interim Dean during July 2007 and as Deputy Dean from 2000 to 2007, and was chair of the editorial board for Wharton School Publishing. His research assesses marketing processes and develops methods for improving marketing decisions. He is widely regarded for his work estimating the impact of a firm’s marketing actions, designing market and survey research, and creating effective communication strategies. Schmittlein has served as a consultant on these issues for numerous firms, including American Express, American Home Products, AT&T, Bausch & Lomb, Boston Scientific, Ford Motor Company, Gianni Versace S.p.A., Hewlett-Packard, Johnson & Johnson, Lockheed Martin, Pfizer, Revlon, Siebe PLC, the Oakland Raiders, The Quaker Oats Co., and Time Warner. His work has been published in leading journals in marketing, management, economics, and statistics. In addition, he has been an area editor for Marketing Science and a member of the editorial board for the Journal of Interactive Marketing, the Journal of Marketing Research, Marketing Letters, and Marketing Science.

    Schmittlein serves on the International Advisory Board for Groupe HEC, the Governing Board of the Indian School of Business, the International Advisory Board of Lingnan (University) College of Sun Yat-sen University, and the Advisory Board for the School of Economics and Management of Tsinghua University. He has served on the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council for Marketing and Branding. He has been a Visiting Professor in the Faculty of Economics at Tokyo University and a Distinguished Scholar in Residence at Washington University’s John M. Olin School of Business. Schmittlein has received awards for his research, his editorial work, and his teaching. His observations and research have been cited often in the popular press, including Advertising Age, Business 2.0, BusinessWeek, China.com, Computerworld, Fortune, NPR’s Marketplace, People’s Daily Online, Reuters,The ABC Evening News with Peter Jennings, The Economist, The Financial Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, U.S. News & World Report, and USA Today. Schmittlein holds a BA in mathematics from Brown University and an MPhil and a PhD in business from Columbia University.

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    Edward Roberts SB ‘57, SM ’58, SM ’60, PhD‘62

    Ed RobertsEdward Roberts is the David Sarnoff Professor of Management of Technology, and the founder, chair, and faculty director of the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship at the MIT Sloan School of Management. He is an expert in advanced technology management and entrepreneurship, a serial high-tech entrepreneur, and a leading angel investor.

    Professor Roberts has literally written the book on high-tech business creation and growth. His Entrepreneurs in High-Technology: Lessons from MIT and Beyond (Oxford University Press, 1991) won the Association of American Publishers Award for Outstanding Book in Business and Management. He has authored over 160 articles and 11 books, the most recent being Innovation: Driving Product, Process, and Market Change (Jossey-Bass/Wiley, 2002). His major 2009 report (updated in 2011), Entrepreneurial Impact: The Role of MIT, documents the history of entrepreneurship at MIT and demonstrates the enormous economic impact generated by companies founded by MIT alumni.

    His own entrepreneurship is as prolific in academia as in industry. Under the direction of Professor Jay Forrester, Roberts was a founding member of the MIT System Dynamics Group in 1958. In 1990 he founded the MIT Entrepreneurship Center (now renamed the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship), which he has since chaired. He was a founder of MIT Sloan’s Management of Technological Innovation and Entrepreneurship Group, which he chaired for more than 30 years. During the 1970s Professor Roberts co-founded multiple MIT programs in health care delivery, including an interdisciplinary PhD program in Health Policy and Management. During that time he co-directed MIT’s extensive collaboration in management and organizational development with the Association of American Medical Colleges. In 1980 Roberts co-founded and chaired for nearly 20 years, the mid-career MIT Management of Technology (MOT) Program, MIT’s first advanced degree program offered by two Schools. Most recently, in 2006 he co-created and still chairs the MIT Sloan Entrepreneurship & Innovation MBA Track.

    Roberts holds four degrees from MIT: an SB and SM in electrical engineering, an SM in management, and a PhD in economics.

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    Fiona Murray

    Fiona MurrayFiona Murray is the William Porter (1967) Distinguished Professor of Entrepreneurship and the faculty director of the Legatum Center. Professor Murray is also the Associate Dean for Innovation, Co-Director of the Innovation Initiative, and has most recently been appointed a Member of the UK Prime Minister's Council for Science and Technology (CST).

    She is an international expert on the transformation of investments in scientific and technical innovation into innovation-based entrepreneurship that drives jobs, wealth creation, and regional prosperity. Murray has a special interest in how policies, programs, and relationships between academia and industry can be designed to accelerate the productive role of universities in their local entrepreneurial ecosystem. These include intellectual property issues as well as broader programs that enable technology transfer and commercialization.

    Murray has served on the faculty at MIT Sloan since 1999. In 2006 she was promoted to Associate Professor in the Technological Innovation & Entrepreneurship Strategic Management Group. Previously, Murray held positions at Harvard University, the University of Oxford, the Asian Development Bank, and United Nations Environment Program in Kenya.

    Murray received her BA ’89 and MA ‘90 from the University of Oxford in Chemistry. She subsequently moved to the United States and earned an AM ’92 and PhD ’96 from Harvard University in Applied Sciences.

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    Scott Stern

    Scott SternScott Stern is the David Sarnoff Professor of Management and Chair of the Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management Group at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

    Stern explores how innovation and entrepreneurship differ from more traditional economic activities, and the consequences of these differences for strategy and policy. His research in the economics of innovation and entrepreneurship focuses on entrepreneurial strategy, innovation-driven entrepreneurial ecosystems, and innovation policy and management. Recent studies include the impact of clusters on entrepreneurship, the role of institutions in shaping the accumulation of scientific and technical knowledge, and the drivers and consequences of entrepreneurial strategy.

    Stern started his career at MIT, where he taught from 1995 to 2001. Before returning to MIT in 2009, he held positions as a professor at the Kellogg School of Management and as a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution. Stern is the director and co-founder of the Innovation Policy Working Group at the National Bureau of Economic Research. In 2005, he was awarded the Kauffman Prize Medal for Distinguished Research in Entrepreneurship.

    Stern holds a BA in economics from New York University and a PhD in economics from Stanford University.

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    Simon Johnson, PhD '89

    Simon JohnsonSimon Johnson is the Ronald A. Kurtz (1954) Professor of Entrepreneurship at the MIT Sloan School of Management, where he is also head of the Global Economics and Management group, a member of the Executive Personnel Committee, and chair of the Sloan Fellows MBA Program Committee. He cofounded and currently leads the popular Global Entrepreneurship Lab (GLAB) course, working with startup companies around the world.

    Johnson is also a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington, D.C., a co-founder of BaselineScenario.com, and a member since inception of the FDIC’s Systemic Resolution Advisory Committee.

    Over the past seven years, Johnson has published more than 300 high impact pieces in the New York Times, Bloomberg, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, The New Republic, BusinessWeek, The Huffington Post, The Financial Times, and Project Syndicate.

    Johnson holds a BA in economics and politics from the University of Oxford, an MA in economics from the University of Manchester, and a PhD in economics from MIT.

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    Session 1: MIT as a Laboratory for Studying Entrepreneurship

    Session Chair: Fiona Murray

    Fiona MurrayFiona Murray is the William Porter (1967) Distinguished Professor of Entrepreneurship, and the faculty director at the Legatum Center. Professor Murray is also the Associate Dean for Innovation, Co-Director of the Innovation Initiative, and has most recently been appointed a Member of the UK Prime Minister's Council for Science and Technology (CST).

    She is an international expert on the transformation of investments in scientific and technical innovation into innovation-based entrepreneurship that drives jobs, wealth creation, and regional prosperity. Murray has a special interest in how policies, programs, and relationships between academia and industry can be designed to accelerate the productive role of universities in their local entrepreneurial ecosystem. These include intellectual property issues as well as broader programs that enable technology transfer and commercialization.

    Murray has served on the faculty at MIT Sloan since 1999. In 2006 she was promoted to Associate Professor in the Technological Innovation & Entrepreneurship Strategic Management Group. Previously, Murray held positions at Harvard University, the University of Oxford, the Asian Development Bank, and United Nations Environment Program in Kenya.

    Murray received her BA ’89 and MA ‘90 from the University of Oxford in Chemistry. She subsequently moved to the United States and earned an AM ’92 and PhD ’96 from Harvard University in Applied Sciences.

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    David Hsu, PhD ‘01

    David HsuDavid Hsu is the Richard A. Sapp Professor and a Professor of Management (with tenure) at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. He graduated from Stanford University with undergraduate majors in economics and political science. After a few years working in industry, he received his master’s degree in public policy from Harvard University, followed by his Ph.D. in management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    Hsu’s research interests are in entrepreneurial innovation and management. Within that domain, he has investigated topics such as intellectual property management, start-up innovation, technology commercialization strategy, and venture capital. His research has appeared in leading journals such as Journal of Finance, Management Science, RAND Journal of Economics, and Research Policy. He serves as an associate editor of the Entrepreneurship and Innovation department of Management Science. In 2008, Hsu was awarded an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Industry Studies Fellowship. At Wharton, he teaches two MBA electives, Entrepreneurship and Technology Strategy. At Penn, Hsu is Associate Faculty Director of the Weiss Tech House, which encourages and supports students in the creation, development, and commercialization of innovative technologies.

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    Pian Shu, PhD ‘12

    Pian ShuPian Shu is an Assistant Professor of Business Administration in the Technology and Operations Management Unit of the Harvard Business School. She teaches the Field Immersion Experiences for Leadership Development II (FIELD II) course in the MBA required curriculum. She received the Berol Corporation Fellowship from the Harvard Business School in July 2013.

    Professor Shu’s research focuses on the empirical analysis of factors that affect innovation and productivity at the micro level. She contributes to the field by taking a labor economics perspective and investigating the decisions of individuals. Her current research examines how talented individuals develop into innovators, the impact of early career choices on long-term productivity, the uncertainty associated with becoming an innovator through entrepreneurship, and the impact of technology and trade shocks on innovation.

    A recipient of the Kauffmann Dissertation Fellowship in Entrepreneurship, Professor Shu earned her Ph.D. in economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She graduated from Colgate University with a BA in mathematics and mathematical economics.

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    Charles Eesley, PhD ‘09

    Chuck EesleyChuck Eesley is an Assistant Professor and Morgenthaler Faculty Fellow in the Department of Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University. As part of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program, his research focuses on the role of the institutional and university environment in high-growth, technology entrepreneurship. Prof. Eesley was selected in 2015 as an Inaugural Schulze Distinguished Professor. His National Science Foundation of China and Kauffman award supported research focuses on rethinking how the educational and policy environment shapes the economic and entrepreneurial impact of university alumni. Over the past three years, Prof. Eesley has been playing a growing role in national and international meetings on fostering high-tech entrepreneurship, including advising the U.S. State Department in the Global Innovation through Science and Technology (GIST) program, Chile (CORFO), Taiwan (ITRI), and the Korean Ministry of Science and Technology. He is a member of the Editorial Board for the Strategic Management Journal. Before coming to Stanford, Prof. Eesley completed his Ph.D. at the M.I.T. Sloan School of Management in 2009 where he won BPS Division and Kauffman Dissertation Awards for his work on high-tech entrepreneurship in China.

    He started his first company while earning a Bachelor's degree from Duke University in 2002 (Biological Basis of Behavior). Prof. Eesley spent 2002-2005 doing research at the Duke University Medical Center (schizophrenia) and Duke’s Center for Health Policy (vaccine innovation). His work has been published among other places in Organization Science, Strategic Management Journal, Research Policy, and Biological Psychiatry. Prof. Eesley previously was an entrepreneur (Lobby 10, Sun Dance Genetics, Learning Friends), early employee (NovoEd.com), board member/advisor (Blackbird, LessonFace, TommyJams), and investor (Flagship Ventures, Lux Capital). NovoEd.com launched around his online course, which was the first entrepreneurship MOOC and has taught over 200,000 students in over 100 countries. He currently serves on the Advisory Boards of Startup Chile as well as private companies in online education and AI/Deep Learning. He has given invited talks in forums with the Prime Minister of Slovenia and keynote addresses in Taiwan, China, and Brazil. His research findings have been featured in outlets such as Forbes (2011, 2012, 2013, 2015), Bloomberg, Smart Money, Stanford News, 2012, 2016, Wall Street Journal, SFGate, The Independent, Boston.com (Bill Gates), Inc. magazine, and the Chronicle of Higher Education.

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    Elicia Maine, SB '97

    Elicia MaineElicia Maine’s research interests are in technological innovation and science & technology entrepreneurship. She is most interested in understanding the formation and growth of science-based businesses. Specifically, she studies the commercialization strategy, business models, entrepreneurial decision-making, and knowledge integration practices of entrepreneurs and ventures in the advanced materials, nanomaterials, fuel cell, biotechnology, and nano-biotechnology sectors. Along with her international group of collaborators, Dr. Maine is active in the Advanced Materials Commercialization Research Collaboration and the Global Bio-Nano research group.

    Dr. Maine has published in leading technology management journals, such as Research Policy, R&D Management, and Technovation. To reach scientist-entrepreneurs on their own turf, she also publishes her technology innovation research in top science and technology journals, including Nature Nanotechnology and Nature Materials. Dr. Maine has presented her research at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and at the Academy of Management (AOM). She has also developed an investment methodology for materials, a strategic tool used to assist seed capital firms in assessing early stage material innovations, and co-authored a manual on this topic: Succeeding with New Materials, a Comprehensive Guide for Assessing Market Potential.

    Before academia, Elicia worked in industry as a strategic consultant in Canada, the United States, and Austria.

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    Session 2: MIT Research Approaches to Entrepreneurship

    Session Chair: Antoinette Schoar

    Antoinette SchoarAntoinette Schoar is the Michael M. Koerner (1949) Professor of Entrepreneurship and a Professor of Finance at the MIT Sloan School of Management. An expert in corporate finance, entrepreneurship, and organizational economics, Schoar researches venture capital, entrepreneurial finance, corporate diversification, governance, and capital budgeting decisions in firms. She has received the Fellowship of the George Stigler Center, 1997–1999, and the ERP Doctoral Scholarship of the German Ministry of Trade, 1995–1997.

    Schoar holds a diploma in economics from the University of Cologne, Germany, and a PhD in economics from the University of Chicago.

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    Sonali Shah, PhD ‘03

    Sonali K. ShahSonali K. Shah is an Assistant Professor of Strategy & Entrepreneurship at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign.

    Drawing on rich, primary source data, and her experience working with innovators in Silicon Valley and Boston, her research illuminates new models of innovation and entrepreneurship. Her current research examines the implications of collaborative models of innovation development (such as open source software development) for corporate product development and industrial competition. Innovation communities generate breakthrough products and seed successful startups. They shape many industries, including automobiles, software, medical devices, and sports equipment. Their presence generates opportunities and challenges for established firms and policymakers. In other work, she examines the career choices that lead to start-up success, as well as the characteristics of makerspaces that seed innovative startups.

    She has worked with high technology clients as an investment banker at Morgan Stanley & Co. and as a consultant at McKinsey & Co. She has also worked on issues related to refugee resettlement and education as a volunteer with the American Red Cross.

    She graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a B.S.E. in Biomedical Engineering and a B.S.E. in Economics from the Wharton School. She holds a Ph.D. in Management from MIT’s Sloan School of Management.

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    Ramana Nanda, PhD ‘07

    Ramana NandaRamana Nanda is a Professor of Business Administration in the Entrepreneurial Management unit at Harvard Business School. He teaches Entrepreneurial Finance in the second year of the MBA program and in HBS executive education offerings.

    Ramana's research focuses on understanding the drivers of financing constraints for startups and on the ways in which the structure of the financial sector impacts innovation and entrepreneurship in the economy. One strand of research has looked at debt financing for small businesses. This work has examined how the availability and the cost of personal debt, such as home equity loans, as well as how the structure of the commercial banking sector, has shaped the entry and growth of small businesses. A second strand examines the financing of innovation and the commercialization of new technologies. This work has studied how constraints to experimentation by venture capital and angel investors across industries, regions or time impact the rate and trajectory of innovation by startup ventures.

    Prior to starting his Ph.D., Ramana was based in the London and New York offices of Oliver, Wyman & Company, where he worked primarily with clients in global capital markets as well as in small-business banking. He continues to advise startup ventures on their financing strategies and also works with philanthropic investors who use market-based solutions to address poverty and promote entrepreneurship in developing countries.

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    Karim Lakhani, SM ’99, PhD ’06

    Karim R. LakhaniKarim R. Lakhani is an Associate Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School, the Principal Investigator of the Crowd Innovation Lab and NASA Tournament Lab at the Harvard Institute for Quantitative Social Science and the faculty co-founder of the Harvard Business School Digital Initiative.

    He specializes in technology management and innovation. His research examines crowd-based innovation models and the digital transformation of companies and industries. Professor Lakhani is known for his pioneering scholarship on how communities and contests can be designed and managed to achieve innovative outcomes. He has partnered with NASA, TopCoder and the Harvard Medical School to conduct field experiments on the design of crowd innovation programs. His research on digital transformation has shown the importance of data and analytics as drivers of business and operating model transformation and source of competitive advantage.

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    Olenka Kacperczyk

    Olenka KacperczykOlenka Kacperczyk is the Fred Kayne (1960) Career Development Professor of Entrepreneurship and an Associate Professor of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

    Kacperczyk’s work focuses on how social structures shape the processes of entrepreneurship and innovation. Using the lens of organization theory and economic sociology, her research examines how such processes are generated and how they affect the key outcomes for organizations and individuals. Her current research explores how entrepreneurial processes interact with organizational boundaries in knowledge-intensive industries via an individual’s decision to found a new venture inside the organization or to leave and launch a new idea through a startup. Using biographical data on portfolio managers in the mutual fund and hedge fund industries over the last two decades, Kacperczyk examines how school ties, identity, and career imprinting affect an individual’s entrepreneurship choices.

    Kacperczyk holds a BA from Mount Holyoke College and a PhD in management and organizations from the University of Michigan.

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    Session 3: MIT Entrepreneurship Research Influences Upon Policy

    Session Chair: Scott Stern

    Scott SternScott Stern is the David Sarnoff Professor of Management and Chair of the Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management Group at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

    Stern explores how innovation and entrepreneurship differ from more traditional economic activities, and the consequences of these differences for strategy and policy. His research in the economics of innovation and entrepreneurship focuses on entrepreneurial strategy, innovation-driven entrepreneurial ecosystems, and innovation policy and management. Recent studies include the impact of clusters on entrepreneurship, the role of institutions in shaping the accumulation of scientific and technical knowledge, and the drivers and consequences of entrepreneurial strategy.

    Stern started his career at MIT, where he taught from 1995 to 2001. Before returning to MIT in 2009, he held positions as a professor at the Kellogg School of Management and as a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution. Stern is the director and co-founder of the Innovation Policy Working Group at the National Bureau of Economic Research. In 2005, he was awarded the Kauffman Prize Medal for Distinguished Research in Entrepreneurship.

    Stern holds a BA in economics from New York University and a PhD in economics from Stanford University.

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    Dan Fehder, PhD ‘16

    Dan FehderDan Fehder is a Doctoral recipient in the TIES Group at the MIT Sloan School of Management. He studied entrepreneurship, innovation, and technology strategy; exploring the interactions between entrepreneurship programs and ecosystems.

    In his research, he explores the role that entrepreneurship programs, particularly startup accelerators, play in shaping the performance of startups and, more broadly, the performance of innovation ecosystems. Fehder's Job Market paper uses detailed administrative data from MassChallenge, the world’s largest startup accelerator, to measure who benefits most from accelerator admission: startups from high-activity entrepreneurial ecosystems or startups from relatively inactive ecosystems. Another paper in his dissertation (joint work with Yael Hochberg) explores the change in entrepreneurial activity associated with the arrival of an accelerator in a region. They found a dramatic rise in the number of early stage investments and investors after an accelerator arrives in a region.

    Fehder holds an AB in cognitive neuroscience and history of science from Harvard University, an MA in history and sociology of science from the University of Pennsylvania, and a PhD from MIT.

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    William Kerr, PhD ‘05

    William KerrWilliam Kerr is a Professor at Harvard Business School. Bill is the faculty chair of the Launching New Ventures program for executive education, and he has received Harvard's Distinction in Teaching award.

    Bill focuses on how companies and economies explore new opportunities and generate growth. He considers the leadership and resources necessary to identify, launch and sustain dynamic and enduring organizations, and his recent work on Launching Global Ventures especially emphasized global opportunities. Bill is a recipient of the Ewing Marion Kauffman Prize Medal for Distinguished Research in Entrepreneurship.

    Bill and his family live in Lexington, MA. They enjoy outdoor sports and trail running, are active members of their local church, and maintain close ties to his wife's home country of Finland. Bill grew up in Alabama and remains a passionate college football fan.

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    Mercedes Delgado

    Mercedes DelgadoMercedes Delgado is a Senior Lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management, and the Research Director and Research Scientist of the MIT Innovation Initiative Lab for Innovation Science and Policy. Delgado also serves as Senior Associate at the Institute for Strategy and Competitiveness at Harvard Business School.

    Delgado’s research focuses on the relationship between the regional business environment and the performance of firms, regions, and countries. She examines the role of regional clusters—geographic concentrations of related industries, firms, and supporting institutions —in job creation, innovation, entrepreneurship, and resilience. Delgado has developed new methods for defining and mapping clusters, providing tools to help firms, practitioners, and policymakers create regional strategies. More broadly, she studies the determinants of national and regional competitiveness, seeking to understand how different components of the microeconomic and macroeconomic environment contribute to prosperity. In recent work she explores the interaction between the spatial organization of firms, their location choices through the value chain, and firm performance. She is also interested in how to best connect businesses in inner cities—economically distressed areas within a city— to their surrounding cities in order to facilitate inclusive prosperity.

    Delgado’s work has been published in top economic, policy, and strategy journals. She has received a number of prestigious fellowships and research grants, and recently served as a lead researcher on the US Cluster Mapping Project: Mapping a Nation of Regional Clusters.

    Delgado earned a PhD in Business Economics from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid and completed postdoctoral fellowships at Harvard Business School and the National Bureau of Economic Research’s Innovation Policy and the Economy Group.

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    Matt Marx, SM '95

    Matthew MarxMatthew Marx is an Associate Professor of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

    Drawing on his experience working in both Silicon Valley and Boston startups, Marx studies the systematic and institutional barriers to the growth of new ventures. His current research focuses on the implications of employee non-compete agreements, which are ostensibly used to protect trade secrets, but also may impact interorganizational and cross-regional mobility, utilization of expertise, and the ability of small companies to attract talent. In other work, he examines strategy formation in new ventures as well as the allocation of equity among co-founders. Marx holds seven patents, and was previously an inventor and an executive at multiple startup companies in the speech recognition industry. As vice president of professional services at Tellme Networks, he led a team of 75 in growing annualized revenue from $5 million to more than $100 million.

    Marx holds a BS in symbolic systems from Stanford University, an SM in media arts and sciences from MIT, and an MBA and a DBA in business administration from Harvard University.

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    Luncheon Panel: On the Shoulders of Giants

    Bill Aulet, SF '94

    Bill AuletBill Aulet is the managing director of the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship at MIT and also a senior lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management. The center is responsible for entrepreneurship across all five schools at MIT starting with education but also extending well outside the class room with student clubs, conferences, competitions, networking events, awards, hackathons, student trips and most recently accelerators.

    Prior to joining MIT, Bill had a 25 year track record of success in business himself. He has directly raised more than $100 million in funding for his companies and more importantly has led to the creation of hundreds of millions of dollars in market value in those companies.

    A former professional basketball player, Bill lives in Belmont, Massachusetts with his wife and has four grown sons. Aulet holds a bachelor’s degree in engineering from Harvard University and an SM from the MIT Sloan School of Management.

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    Bilikis Adebiyi, MBA '12

    Bilikis AdebiyiBilikis Adebiyi is an inspiring Nigerian social entrepreneur and founder of WeCyclers. Her company offers waste collection and recycling services to the Lagos informal settlements, where an estimated 66% of Lagosians live. As a part of the process, residents are offered an incentive for collecting their household waste which is picked up for free by Wecyclers using specially adapted bicycles. To create incentives among low-income households to participate, rewards are given to them for every kilogram recycled, via points sent by SMS. These points are then redeemable against goods they value, such as cell phone minutes or basic food items. The rewards have been funded in partnership with big brands such as Coca Cola and GlaxoSmithKline.

    Adebiyi-Abiola and her cofounders started WeCyclers in 2012, using low-cost cargo bicycles called WeCycles to provide convenient recycling services to households across Nigeria. Although born and raised in Lagos, Bilikiss initially developed the idea for her business in the US whilst she was a student at the MIT Sloan School of Management. This followed a five-year career as a corporate software engineer at IBM where she gained invaluable business and technology experience. Whilst at MIT, she was assigned to a study project aimed at finding solutions to tangibly help people at the bottom of the social pyramid. In Nigeria, about 70 per cent of Nigerians are at the base of the pyramid and are very poor; they don’t have basic sanitation; they don’t have basic healthcare, and she wanted to do something that would positively impact that segment. She was also very interested in waste management because as a Nigerian, waste is something she saw everywhere and she wanted to solve that problem. Going back to her country roots in Nigeria, Bilikiss was inspired to work on finding a much-needed and effective new solution to the problem of waste management.

    Ella Peinovich, MA '12

    Ella PeinovichElla Peinovich a graduate of MIT, has worked on social enterprises in and around the slums of Nairobi for the past 3 years. With experience in systems design and a desire to improve women’s autonomy in a sustainable manner, Ella is one of the chief visionaries and designers of Soko.

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    Chazz Sims, SB '13, MNG '14

    Chazz SimsChazz Sims is the CEO and co-founder of Wise Systems.

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    Shireen Yates, MBA '13

    Shireen YatesShireen Taleghani Yates is co-founder and CEO of Nima. She has been leading a gluten-free diet for the past eight years due to multiple food allergies. After pursuing an MBA from MIT Sloan, she decided to pursue her passion for helping people lead healthier lifestyles by starting 6SensorLabs, now called Nima. Founded in 2013, Nima is creating greater food transparency that enables consumers to make better health decisions. Its first product is a discreet and portable device that allows consumers to test their meals for unwanted ingredients in approximately two minutes - starting with gluten. Our goal is to alleviate the stress around unknown food ingredients, deliver social freedom and make mealtime enjoyable again.

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    Building an MIT Entrepreneurship Program – The Early Years

    Edward Roberts SB ‘57, SM ’58, SM ’60, PhD‘62

    Ed RobertsEdward B. Roberts is the David Sarnoff Professor of Management of Technology, and the founder, chair, and faculty director of the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship at the MIT Sloan School of Management. He is an expert in advanced technology management and entrepreneurship, a serial high-tech entrepreneur, and a leading angel investor.

    Professor Roberts has literally written the book on high-tech business creation and growth. His Entrepreneurs in High-Technology: Lessons from MIT and Beyond (Oxford University Press, 1991) won the Association of American Publishers Award for Outstanding Book in Business and Management. He has authored over 160 articles and 11 books, the most recent being Innovation: Driving Product, Process, and Market Change (Jossey-Bass/Wiley, 2002). His major 2009 report (updated in 2011), Entrepreneurial Impact: The Role of MIT, documents the history of entrepreneurship at MIT and demonstrates the enormous economic impact generated by companies founded by MIT alumni.

    His own entrepreneurship is as prolific in academia as in industry. Under the direction of Professor Jay Forrester, Roberts was a founding member of the MIT System Dynamics Group in 1958. In 1990 he founded the MIT Entrepreneurship Center (now renamed the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship), which he has since chaired. He was a founder of MIT Sloan’s Management of Technological Innovation and Entrepreneurship Group, which he chaired for more than 30 years. During the 1970s Professor Roberts co-founded multiple MIT programs in health care delivery, including an interdisciplinary PhD program in Health Policy and Management. During that time he co-directed MIT’s extensive collaboration in management and organizational development with the Association of American Medical Colleges. In 1980 Roberts co-founded and chaired for nearly 20 years, the mid-career MIT Management of Technology (MOT) Program, MIT’s first advanced degree program offered by two Schools. Most recently, in 2006 he co-created and still chairs the MIT Sloan Entrepreneurship & Innovation MBA Track.

    Roberts holds four degrees from MIT: an SB and SM in electrical engineering, an SM in management, and a PhD in economics.

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    Session 4: Internal Development of MIT Entrepreneurship

    Session Chair: Scott Stern

    Scott SternScott Stern is the David Sarnoff Professor of Management and Chair of the Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management Group at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

    Stern explores how innovation and entrepreneurship differ from more traditional economic activities, and the consequences of these differences for strategy and policy. His research in the economics of innovation and entrepreneurship focuses on entrepreneurial strategy, innovation-driven entrepreneurial ecosystems, and innovation policy and management. Recent studies include the impact of clusters on entrepreneurship, the role of institutions in shaping the accumulation of scientific and technical knowledge, and the drivers and consequences of entrepreneurial strategy.

    Stern started his career at MIT, where he taught from 1995 to 2001. Before returning to MIT in 2009, he held positions as a professor at the Kellogg School of Management and as a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution. Stern is the director and co-founder of the Innovation Policy Working Group at the National Bureau of Economic Research. In 2005, he was awarded the Kauffman Prize Medal for Distinguished Research in Entrepreneurship.

    Stern holds a BA in economics from New York University and a PhD in economics from Stanford University.

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    Lita Nelsen, SB ’64, SM ‘66, SF ’79

    Lita NelsenLita Nelsen was the former director of the Technology Licensing Office at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This office manages over 350 new inventions per year from M.I.T., the Whitehead Institute, and Lincoln Laboratory. Typically, they negotiate over 100 licenses, and start up 10 to 15 companies per year.

    Prior to joining the M.I.T. Technology Licensing Office, Ms. Nelsen spent 20 years in industry, primarily in the fields of membrane separations, medical devices, and biotechnology, at such companies as Amicon, Millipore, Arthur D. Little, Inc., and Applied Biotechnology.

    Ms. Nelsen was the 1992 President of the Association of University Technology Managers and serves on the Board of the State of Massachusetts Technology Development Corporation and the Massachusetts Biotechnology Corporation and has served on the Boards of the M.I.T. Enterprise Forum, the Cornell Research Foundation and other boards. She has served as advisor to the NIH, the National Academy of Sciences and the Office of Technology Assessment. She is widely published in the field of technology transfer and university/industry collaborations.

    Ms. Nelsen earned B.S. (1964) and M.S. (1966) degrees in Chemical Engineering from M.I.T. and an M.S. in Management (1979) from M.I.T. as a Sloan Fellow.

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    Sherwin Greenblatt, SB ‘62, SM ’64

    Sherwin GreenblattSherwin Greenblatt volunteers his time as Director of the MIT Venture Mentoring Service, which supports innovation and entrepreneurial activity throughout the MIT community by matching prospective entrepreneurs with experienced volunteer mentors who, through their advice, guidance and contacts, can boost the chances of a start-up's success.

    Greenblatt, retired from Bose Corporation, was the first employee of Dr. Amar Bose, his former professor at MIT. As the company grew, he held the positions of Project Engineer, Chief Engineer, Director of Engineering, Executive Vice President and, for 15 years, President.

    He currently is the Vice-chairman of the Board of Trustees at the Olin College of Engineering and serves on the Board of Directors of Bose Corporation. He has been a member of the Board of Directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, served as Chair of the MetroWest Chamber of Commerce and as Chairman of the Board of Trustees at Framingham (Massachusetts) State College.

    Mr. Greenblatt holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering from MIT.

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    Leon Sandler

    Leon SandlerLeon Sandler is the Executive Director of the Deshpande Center for Technological Innovation. He is responsible for guiding the center’s strategic direction, ensuring successful execution of its mission, and managing day-today operations.

    With a strong background in the assessment of technologies for commercialization, Mr. Sandler leads a process the center calls “select, direct and connect”. Through this process, faculty research projects are chosen to receive Deshpande Center grants, based on a project’s potential commercial and social impact. Research teams then receive intensive guidance in how to bring their inventions to the marketplace and form new spinout companies.

    Before joining the Deshpande Center in 2006, Leon Sandler held senior positions in general management, marketing, finance and business development at companies such as Boston Consulting Group, Eastman Kodak, Texas Instruments and Digital Equipment Corporation. He founded the consulting firm Monmouth Group, where he provided management, marketing and business development assistance to over twenty early-stage companies. This included co-founding and serving as the CEO of Nuvonyx, a maker of industrial laser systems; serving as CEO of several start-ups; and assisting many ventures as an interim executive or advisor.

    Mr. Sandler received his B.S. degree in 1971 and his M.S. in Chemical Engineering in 1973 from Natal University in South Africa, and his M.B.A. in 1977 from the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

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    Alex 'Sandy' Pentland, PhD ’82

    Sandy PentlandSandy Pentland helped to create and direct the Media Lab, where he directs the Human Dynamics research group and leads the Connection Science initiative.

    One of the most-cited scientists in the world, Forbes recently declared him one of the "7 most powerful data scientists in the world" along with Google founders and the Chief Technical Officer of the United States. He is a founding member of advisory boards for Google, AT&T, Nissan, and the UN Secretary General, and a serial entrepreneur who has co-founded more than a dozen companies including social enterprises such as the Data Transparency Lab, the Harvard-ODI-MIT DataPop Alliance, and the Institute for Data-Driven Design.

    Pentland and his students pioneered computational social science, organizational engineering, wearable computing (Google Glass), image understanding, and modern biometrics. His most recent books are Social Physics (Penguin Press, 2014) and Honest Signals (MIT Press, 2008).

    He received his BS in computer science from the University of Michigan, and his PhD in computer science, psychology, and AI from MIT. Pentland is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, a leader within the World Economic Forum, and has received numerous awards and prizes including the McKinsey Award from Harvard Business Review, the 40th Anniversary of the Internet from DARPA, and the Brandeis Award for work in privacy.

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    Session 5: Extending MIT Entrepreneurship to the Rest of the World

    Session Chair: Fiona Murray

    Fiona MurrayFiona Murray is the William Porter (1967) Distinguished Professor of Entrepreneurship, the Faculty Director at both the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship and the Legatum Center. Professor Murray is also the Associate Dean for Innovation, Co-Director of the Innovation Initiative, and has most recently been appointed a Member of the UK Prime Minister's Council for Science and Technology (CST).

    She is an international expert on the transformation of investments in scientific and technical innovation into innovation-based entrepreneurship that drives jobs, wealth creation, and regional prosperity. Murray has a special interest in how policies, programs, and relationships between academia and industry can be designed to accelerate the productive role of universities in their local entrepreneurial ecosystem. These include intellectual property issues as well as broader programs that enable technology transfer and commercialization.

    Murray has served on the faculty at MIT Sloan since 1999. In 2006 she was promoted to Associate Professor in the Technological Innovation & Entrepreneurship Strategic Management Group. Previously, Murray held positions at Harvard University, the University of Oxford, the Asian Development Bank, and United Nations Environment Program in Kenya.

    Murray received her BA ’89 and MA ‘90 from the University of Oxford in Chemistry. She subsequently moved to the United States and earned an AM ’92 and PhD ’96 from Harvard University in Applied Sciences.

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    Yasheng Huang

    Yasheng HuangYasheng Huang is the International Program Professor in Chinese Economy and Business and a Professor of Global Economics and Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management. He is also an Associate Dean at MIT Sloan School of Management.

    Huang founded and runs the China Lab and the India Lab, which aim to help entrepreneurs in those countries improve their management skills. He is an expert source on international business, political economy, and international management. In collaboration with other scholars, Huang is conducting research on human capital formation in China and India, entrepreneurship, and ethnic and labor-intensive foreign direct investment (FDI). Prior to MIT Sloan, he held faculty positions at the University of Michigan and at Harvard Business School. Huang also served as a consultant to the World Bank.

    Huang holds a BA in government from Harvard College and a PhD in government from Harvard University.

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    Douglas Hart, SM ’85

    Douglas P. HartDouglas P. Hart is an MIT professor of mechanical engineering and co-founder of three venture backed biotechnology companies.

    Doug has a history of successful inventions from within and outside of academia and serves as a technical advisor for numerous companies and professional organizations. He has been involved in the commercial development of technologies ranging from satellite propulsion and unmanned drones to surgical robots.

    Doug received his BSc degree in aeronautical/astronautical engineering from the University of Illinois, his S.M. degree in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the California Institute of Technology.

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    Georgina Campbell Flatter, ESD ‘11

    Georgina Campbell FlatterGeorgina Campbell Flatter is the Director of the MIT Regional Entrepreneurship Acceleration Program (REAP). In this role, she works with multi-stakeholder groups from around the world to build and implement regional ecosystems that accelerate innovation-driven enterprises (IDE).

    Georgina is an actively engaged global innovation ecosystem specialist. She has deep technical expertise in renewable energy and biomaterials, developed through her experiences as an innovative researcher at the Langer Lab at MIT and a venture-funded renewable fuels startup, Sun Catalytix. This technical know-how is paired with a broad knowledge of innovation policy and entrepreneurship acceleration, which she developed during her two-year research assistantship with the MIT Sloan Innovation Group. She enhanced this knowledge and experience through her roles as Managing Director of the MIT Clean Energy Prize, Director and Lecturer of the XPRIZE Lab @ MIT, and later as an innovation consultant at the World Bank. Two of her recent papers were published in top academic journals: PNAS and Research Policy.

    Georgina holds a Master's of Engineering in Materials Science from the University of Oxford and an MS in Technology and Policy from MIT.

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    Koenraad Debackere

    Koenraad DebackereKoenraad Debackere is the General Manager of KU Leuven. Debackere holds Master and PhD degrees in electrical engineering and management.

    He studied at the UGent and MIT, Cambridge, U.S. He is a Full Professor in Technology and Innovation Management at KU Leuven. He has been a Visiting Professor at Nijmegen Business School and is a faculty member at Vlerick Business School. He has been a guest lecturer at various European business schools (Manchester, Kiel, Tilburg, Insead). He is the head of the research division INCENTIM (International Centre for Research on Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management) at KU Leuven. This division has developed extensive experience in doing fundamental and applied research in the area of technology and innovation management.

    Koenraad Debackere has received several international awards and nominations for his research activities in the area of technology and innovation management. He obtained Best Research Paper Awards from the American Academy of Management and the Decisions Sciences Institute. He has authored over 70 articles and book chapters in this field.

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    Session 6: Accelerating Entrepreneurial Growth and Development

    Session Chair: Brad Feld, SB ‘87, SM ‘88

    Brad FeldBrad Feld has been an early stage investor and entrepreneur since 1987. Prior to co-founding Foundry Group, he co-founded Mobius Venture Capital and, prior to that, founded Intensity Ventures. Brad is also a co-founder of Techstars.

    In addition to his investing efforts, Brad has been active with several non-profit organizations and currently is chair of the National Center for Women & Information Technology, co-chair of Startup Colorado, and on the board of Path Forward. Brad is a nationally recognized speaker on the topics of venture capital investing and entrepreneurship and writes the widely read blogs Feld Thoughts, Startup Revolution, and Ask the VC.

    Brad holds Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in Management Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Brad is also an avid art collector and long-distance runner. He has completed 23 marathons as part of his mission to finish a marathon in each of the 50 states.

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    Jean Hammond, SM ’86

    Jean Hammond Jean Hammond is a co-founder and partner at LearnLaunch. She is also the founder of JPH Associates. A serial entrepreneur, she co-founded AXON Networks, which was acquired by 3Com, led 3Com WAN marketing activities and also founded Quarry Technologies. Jean is an active angel investor focusing on early stage high-tech and high-growth start-ups. She is a member of Hub Angels and Launchpad Venture Group, and she is the founder of the Boston Forum of Golden Seeds. She has an active portfolio and has served as a director or advisor with over 30 of the companies within her portfolio.

    Jean was awarded the 2011 Monosson Prize for Entrepreneurship Mentoring by the MIT Sloan School of Management and the 2014 Hans Severiens Award by the Angel Capital Association in recognition of her work advancing angel investing and entrepreneurship. Jean also was awarded the 2013 Boston Business Journal Lifetime Achievement Award.

    Board Seats Include: Member of MIT Corporation (Board of Trustees), North American Executive Board of the MIT Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Innovation Index Advisory Committee, Thompson Island Outward Bound Education Center (Trustee Emeritus), The Capital Network, InStream Media, Peach Underneath, Playrific, and Respiratory Motion.

    Jean received her MS from MIT Sloan School of Management in 1986 and her BS in Biology from Boston University.

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    John Harthorne, MBA ’07

    John HarthorneJohn Harthorne is the Founder and CEO of MassChallenge, the most startup-friendly accelerator on the planet. No equity and not-for-profit, MassChallenge is obsessed with helping entrepreneurs across any industry. They also reward the highest-impact startups through a competition to win a portion of several million dollars in equity-free cash awards. Through MassChallenge’s global network of accelerators in Boston, London, Jerusalem, Geneva, and Mexico City, and unrivalled access to corporate partners, entrepreneurs can have a massive impact - driving growth and creating value the world over. To date, 835 MassChallenge alumni have raised over $1.4 billion and created over 8,500 jobs.

    John earned his MBA from the MIT Sloan School of Management in 2007. While at school, John won Grand Prize in the 2007 MIT $100K Business Plan Competition and received the 2007 Patrick J. McGovern Award for impact on quality and visibility of entrepreneurship at MIT.

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    Emily Reichert, SF ‘12

    Emily ReichertEmily Reichert as Chief Executive Officer, sets Greentown Labs’ strategic direction, focusing on increasing the organization’s impact on clean and energy efficient technology commercialization through entrepreneurship. She also directs Greentown’s efforts to engage new corporate and foundation partners, to expand recognition and education programs for clean technology entrepreneurs, to leverage the local community of entrepreneurs, investors, universities, government agencies and NGOs striving to build our clean energy future, and to maintain greater Boston’s competitiveness in clean technology nationally and internationally.

    Prior to Greentown Labs, Emily was the Director of Business Operations at the Warner Babcock Institute for Green Chemistry, where she helped grow the company from an angel-funded start-up to a sustainable contract R&D business with a mission to minimize environmental impact of chemical processes and products. She has over fifteen years of experience serving in R&D, business development and operations leadership roles.

    Emily holds a PhD in physical chemistry and earned an MBA from MIT.

    Bill Aulet, SF '94

    Bill AuletBill Aulet is the managing director of the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship at MIT and also a senior lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management. The center is responsible for entrepreneurship across all five schools at MIT starting with education but also extending well outside the class room with student clubs, conferences, competitions, networking events, awards, hackathons, student trips and most recently accelerators.

    Prior to joining MIT, Bill had a 25 year track record of success in business himself. He has directly raised more than $100 million in funding for his companies and more importantly has led to the creation of hundreds of millions of dollars in market value in those companies.

    A former professional basketball player, Bill lives in Belmont, Massachusetts with his wife and has four grown sons. Aulet holds a bachelor’s degree in engineering from Harvard University and an SM from the MIT Sloan School of Management.

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    Celebratory Reception & Banquet

    David Schmittlein

    David SchmittleinDavid Schmittlein is the John C Head III Dean and Professor of Marketing at the MIT Sloan School of Management. His focus has been to broaden MIT Sloan’s global visibility, to work with the faculty in creating new high-quality management education programs, to develop enhanced educational opportunities for current students, and to develop and disseminate business knowledge that has impact and that will stand the test of time. He also has reached out to the many members of MIT’s alumni community to gain their valuable insights on MIT Sloan and management education.

    Prior to his appointment at MIT Sloan, Schmittlein was the Ira A. Lipman Professor and Professor of Marketing at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania from 1980 until 2007. He also served as Interim Dean during July 2007 and as Deputy Dean from 2000 to 2007, and was chair of the editorial board for Wharton School Publishing. His research assesses marketing processes and develops methods for improving marketing decisions. He is widely regarded for his work estimating the impact of a firm’s marketing actions, designing market and survey research, and creating effective communication strategies. Schmittlein has served as a consultant on these issues for numerous firms, including American Express, American Home Products, AT&T, Bausch & Lomb, Boston Scientific, Ford Motor Company, Gianni Versace S.p.A., Hewlett-Packard, Johnson & Johnson, Lockheed Martin, Pfizer, Revlon, Siebe PLC, the Oakland Raiders, The Quaker Oats Co., and Time Warner. His work has been published in leading journals in marketing, management, economics, and statistics. In addition, he has been an area editor for Marketing Science and a member of the editorial board for the Journal of Interactive Marketing, the Journal of Marketing Research, Marketing Letters, and Marketing Science.

    Schmittlein serves on the International Advisory Board for Groupe HEC, the Governing Board of the Indian School of Business, the International Advisory Board of Lingnan (University) College of Sun Yat-sen University, and the Advisory Board for the School of Economics and Management of Tsinghua University. He has served on the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council for Marketing and Branding. He has been a Visiting Professor in the Faculty of Economics at Tokyo University and a Distinguished Scholar in Residence at Washington University’s John M. Olin School of Business. Schmittlein has received awards for his research, his editorial work, and his teaching. His observations and research have been cited often in the popular press, including Advertising Age, Business 2.0, BusinessWeek, China.com, Computerworld, Fortune, NPR’s Marketplace, People’s Daily Online, Reuters,The ABC Evening News with Peter Jennings, The Economist, The Financial Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, U.S. News & World Report, and USA Today. Schmittlein holds a BA in mathematics from Brown University and an MPhil and a PhD in business from Columbia University.

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    L. Rafael Reif

    Rafael ReifL. Rafael Reif has served as the 17th President of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) since July 2012, where he is leading MIT’s pioneering efforts to help shape the future of higher education. A champion for both fundamental science and MIT’s signature style of interdisciplinary, problem-centered research, he is also pursuing an aggressive agenda to encourage innovation and entrepreneurship.

    To enhance MIT’s innovation ecosystem and equip the next generation of innovators to drive their ideas to impact, in October 2013, Dr. Reif launched the MIT Innovation Initiative. Milestones include the November 2015 announcement of the MIT Hong Kong Innovation Node, the creation of a new Minor in Entrepreneurship and Innovation beginning Fall 2016, and the January 2016 announcement of the MIT Sandbox Innovation Fund Program, which gives student-initiated projects the early support and mentoring to get off the ground.

    To accelerate research and innovation at the nanoscale, MIT is also constructing MIT.nano, a major new facility at the heart of campus set to open in 2018. And because MIT’s entrepreneurial ecosystem extends well beyond the campus, Dr. Reif is leading an ambitious, decade-long redevelopment initiative in Kendall Square. This will include the creation of an “innovation orchard,” an idea he coined in a May 2015 op-ed in The Washington Post.

    As MIT’s provost (2005-2012), Dr. Reif helped create and implement the strategy that allowed MIT to weather the global financial crisis, drove the growth of MIT’s global strategy, promoted a major faculty-led effort to address challenges around race and diversity, and helped launch the Institute for Medical Engineering and Sciences.

    A member of the MIT faculty since 1980, Dr. Reif has served as director of MIT’s Microsystems Technology Laboratories, as associate department head for Electrical Engineering, and as head of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS). In 2004, he was named the Fariborz Maseeh Professor of Emerging Technology, a title he held until he was selected as president. He remains a mentor and advocate for students, serving each year as a freshman advisor.

    Dr. Reif received the degree of Ingeniero Eléctrico from Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia, Venezuela, and served for a year as an assistant professor at Universidad Simón Bolívar in Caracas. He earned his doctorate in electrical engineering from Stanford University, where he spent a year as a visiting assistant professor.

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    Edward Roberts SB ‘57, SM ’58, SM ’60, PhD‘62

    Ed RobertsEdward Roberts is the David Sarnoff Professor of Management of Technology, and the founder, chair, and faculty director of the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship at the MIT Sloan School of Management. He is an expert in advanced technology management and entrepreneurship, a serial high-tech entrepreneur, and a leading angel investor.

    Professor Roberts has literally written the book on high-tech business creation and growth. His Entrepreneurs in High-Technology: Lessons from MIT and Beyond (Oxford University Press, 1991) won the Association of American Publishers Award for Outstanding Book in Business and Management. He has authored over 160 articles and 11 books, the most recent being Innovation: Driving Product, Process, and Market Change (Jossey-Bass/Wiley, 2002). His major 2009 report (updated in 2011), Entrepreneurial Impact: The Role of MIT, documents the history of entrepreneurship at MIT and demonstrates the enormous economic impact generated by companies founded by MIT alumni.

    His own entrepreneurship is as prolific in academia as in industry. Under the direction of Professor Jay Forrester, Roberts was a founding member of the MIT System Dynamics Group in 1958. In 1990 he founded the MIT Entrepreneurship Center (now renamed the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship), which he has since chaired. He was a founder of MIT Sloan’s Management of Technological Innovation and Entrepreneurship Group, which he chaired for more than 30 years. During the 1970s Professor Roberts co-founded multiple MIT programs in health care delivery, including an interdisciplinary PhD program in Health Policy and Management. During that time he co-directed MIT’s extensive collaboration in management and organizational development with the Association of American Medical Colleges. In 1980 Roberts co-founded and chaired for nearly 20 years, the mid-career MIT Management of Technology (MOT) Program, MIT’s first advanced degree program offered by two Schools. Most recently, in 2006 he co-created and still chairs the MIT Sloan Entrepreneurship & Innovation MBA Track.

    Roberts holds four degrees from MIT: an SB and SM in electrical engineering, an SM in management, and a PhD in economics.

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