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MIT fuses design and management with new master track — Matthew Kressy

From Business Because When you launch a new master’s degree track at a place like MIT, you get asked a lot of questions. The most common ones I get are: what do you want students to get out of the Integrated Design & Management (IDM) program? How did it get started? How does it work? And what kinds of students are you looking for? I want to give designers a voice. Traditionally, designers are not well versed in the languages of engineering and business. They’re great at inventing and creating, but they’re generally not good at explaining how those creations could be profitable or feasible. As a result, business and engineering decisions get made without the benefit of design sensibilities and insights. I want to empower designers to speak up and provide them with the management tools to more effectively communicate their vision. My hope is that this program helps … Read More »The post MIT fuses design and management with new master track — Matthew Kressy appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

Too much, too little, just right: Stress at work, and the Goldilocks Principle — Andrew Yap

From WBUR Cognoscenti Stress used to be a dirty word. Study after study has shown that stress makes workers less productive, less satisfied, less healthy — and, therefore, more likely to call in sick. For many years, the message to managers was simple: Stress causes burnout; avoid it for yourself and for those who work under you at all costs. Nowadays, however, the message is more complex. A growing body of research indicates that some stress is good for workers. Perhaps more important, studies have found that too little stress can be bad. Stress related to boredom leads employees to engage in counterproductive work behavior, such as spending aimless time on the Internet for non-work reasons, gossiping about colleagues, and taking way too much time completing work assignments. So: Excessive stress leads to mental exhaustion and poor health, but not enough stress results in boredom and demotivation. What’s a manager to do? The answer lies in the Goldilocks Principle. The optimal level of stress is … Read More »The post Too much, too little, just right: Stress at work, and the Goldilocks Principle — Andrew Yap appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

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