Faculty Expertise Guide

When you want information on timely business topics, MIT Sloan School of Management can provide the expertise you need.

Our internationally renowned faculty and research staff explore the world's most critical business problems and share their insightful solutions through dynamic classroom discussions. This guide provides a window on the intellectual vibrancy of MIT Sloan.

The great volume of research conducted at MIT Sloan and the interests of our faculty and researchers continually evolve, so please contact Paul Denning, director of Media Relations, if you don't find what you need.

New technology might help rein in big banks — Simon Johnson

From ShanghaiDaily.com After nearly a decade of crisis, bailout and reform in the United States and the European Union, the financial system — both in those countries and globally — is remarkably similar to the one we had in 2006. Many financial reforms have been attempted since 2010, but the overall effects have been limited. Some big banks have struggled, but others have risen to take their place. Both before the 2008 global financial crisis and today, just over a dozen big banks dominate the world’s financial landscape. And yet the ground is shifting beneath the financial sector, and big banks could soon become a thing of the past. Few officials privately express satisfaction with the progress of financial reform. In public, most of them are more polite, but the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, Neel Kashkari, struck a chord recently when he called for a reevaluation … Read More »The post New technology might help rein in big banks — Simon Johnson appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

Investors should worry about China’s debt-burdened cities — Deborah Lucas and Doug Criscitello

From Fortune High rates of debt growth by local governments are a cause for concern in any country. In China, where recent turmoil in the equity and foreign-exchange markets has put a spotlight on that country’s economy and growth prospects, increasing levels of borrowing by provincial and other lower levels of government has resulted in local indebtedness rising nearly four-fold since 2008, reaching about 40% of GDP. Debt growth of that magnitude raises concerns about fiscal sustainability, debt affordability, transparency and accountability. Cautionary tales abound. From New York City in the ‘70s, emerging market countries in the ‘80s, Russia in the ‘90s, and Detroit, Greece and Puerto Rico more recently, there is a long list of governments that have experienced the painful economic repercussions of taking on debt they could not afford. While the massive debt buildup in China presents challenges, the situation is not as dire as a full-blown … Read More »The post Investors should worry about China’s debt-burdened cities — Deborah Lucas and Doug Criscitello appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

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