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Ready to win: What police, companies and the rest of us can learn from the Patriots — Steven Spear

From The Conversation More than a week after becoming football legend, the Super Bowl’s last-minute interception continues to prompt second guessing: did Seattle Seahawks coach Pete Carroll make a bad call when he ordered Russell Wilson throw the ball? Did the quarterback pass poorly? Or are we focusing on the wrong things altogether? First, let’s look at the now (in)famous play. Running the ball, like many Monday-morning quarterbacks have advocated, would have resulted in a massive pileup at the line, and the receiver Wilson spotted in the end zone didn’t appear well covered. That is until Patriots defender Malcolm Butler emerged as if out of nowhere for the game-saving and Super Bowl-winning interception. Butler didn’t just get lucky. From a position nearly 20 yards from where he caught the ball, Butler got to the right spot, in about two seconds, at precisely the right moment. It was as if he knew … Read More »The post Ready to win: What police, companies and the rest of us can learn from the Patriots — Steven Spear appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

The arrogance of the disciplinarians — Roberto Rigobon

From The Hill People love to use moral hazard as an excuse to inflict pain on others. So do governments, as we are seeing as the European Union once again threatens Greece with severe measures for that nation’s failure to fully implement the EU’s harsh austerity measures. The argument is extraordinarily simple: if a country cannot discipline itself, then we will teach it discipline through financial lashes. After all, didn’t Greece bring this pain on itself? A similar mindset drove debt restructuring in Argentina in 2001. The U.S. treasury wanted to make Argentina an example for the whole Latin American region: If Argentina did not reduce its fiscal deficit to zero as promised, the argument went, the nation would deserve to suffer and the government would need to go. Indeed, Argentina did not reduce its deficit to zero, but it got it down to 0.6 percent in the third quarter of … Read More »The post The arrogance of the disciplinarians — Roberto Rigobon appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

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