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The most intelligent groups aren’t just a bunch of smart people — Thomas Malone

From Quartz It’s becoming increasingly important for businesses to think about themselves not just in terms of their productivity and efficiency, but also their intelligence. But how do you measure an organization’s intelligence? And with so many groups working remotely, can you measure an online group’s intelligence? It turns out that you can measure and predict group intelligence, and that the same factors affect both face-to-face and online groups. In a prior study, my colleagues and I took the same statistics techniques used to measure individual intelligence and applied them to measure the intelligence of groups. As far as we know, nobody had ever before asked if groups had an “intelligence factor,” just as individuals do. We found that there is indeed a single statistical factor for group intelligence that predicts how well the group will perform on a wide variety of tasks. We called this factor “collective intelligence,” and it is … Read More »The post The most intelligent groups aren’t just a bunch of smart people — Thomas Malone appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

Why Retailers Must (But Won’t) Succeed In Introducing Mobile Payment Systems — Catherine Tucker

From TechCrunch  In the digital age, it’s critical for retailers to collect and manage customer data. This information is the key to providing personalization for any kind of shopping experience, as it allows retailers to understand customer preferences and analyze shopping histories. Smartphone payment systems like Apple Pay are an important method of obtaining this data since they allow data collection across different retailers for the same individual. However, when the data is collected and controlled by a third party like Apple, it is risky for retailers. Read the full post at TechCrunch   Catherine Tucker is the Mark Hyman Jr. Career Development Professor and Associate Professor of Management Science at MIT Sloan.The post Why Retailers Must (But Won’t) Succeed In Introducing Mobile Payment Systems — Catherine Tucker appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

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