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Why the future of digital security is open — Lou Shipley

From TechCrunch The topic of digital security often brings to mind the image of bleak and dark future, where computers, mobile devices and other systems are riddled with malware and cyber criminals lurk, ready to steal our data and crash our systems. We have good reason to be nervous. We’ve seen plenty of cyber-security breaches in the past few years, like credit card thefts at Target and password issues at sites like LinkedIn. Digital security is a major concern. Few other issues affect everyone, from individuals to companies to entire nations. So what is the future of digital security? One discussion thread centers on email encryption, prompted by Yahoo joining forces with Google and Microsoft to develop an encrypted email system. While encryption is a step in the right direction, it’s probably not sufficient by itself. In addition to usability issues — like compatibility of platforms and the human tendency … Read More »The post Why the future of digital security is open — Lou Shipley appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

Preaching to the choir? Beyond the People’s Climate March — Christopher Knittel

From WBUR Cognoscenti Huge crowds recently descended on New York City to demand action on climate change. While it was an important event, I’m not sure what the march accomplished, beyond calling more attention to this critical issue. But there is a way to harness this kind of people power in a way that can have a real impact: Organize a string of high-profile marches and other activities right in the congressional districts of politicians who continue to deny undeniable science. True political change doesn’t necessarily happen by marching in front of world leaders and others who already largely agree with you. But there can be a real impact if some of these same marchers would be willing to demonstrate in less friendly political territory to directly take on some powerful people who stand in the way of meaningful efforts to combat climate change. Take, for example, the U. S. House of Representatives Committee on … Read More »The post Preaching to the choir? Beyond the People’s Climate March — Christopher Knittel appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

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