When you want information on timely business topics, MIT Sloan School of Management can provide the expertise you need.

Our internationally renowned faculty and research staff explore the world's most critical business problems and share their insightful solutions through dynamic classroom discussions. This guide provides a window on the intellectual vibrancy of MIT Sloan.

The great volume of research conducted at MIT Sloan and the interests of our faculty and researchers continually evolve, so please contact Paul Denning, director of Media Relations, if you don't find what you need.

Job creation to meet population growth a daunting task — S.P. Kothari

From MoneyControl.com  In an exclusive interview with CNBC-TV18’s Malvika Jain on July 02, 2014, SP Kothari, Deputy Dean, MIT Sloan School of Management gave his take on the expectations from Arun Jaitely’s maiden Union Budget and his outlook on the road ahead for the Indian economy. Below is the verbatim transcript of the interview: Q: Government is in the process of preparing its first Budget since it took charge. What should be the priority areas where the government should focus? A: Mr. Jaitley has to recognize and Mr. Modi also has to recognize that changing the furniture around the house is not going to make the house look that much different. It might make it look somewhat different but that is not a game changer and they have to think in terms of policies that dramatically alter if the goal is to increase the per capita income from where it … Read More »The post Job creation to meet population growth a daunting task — S.P. Kothari appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

The financial case for local manufacturing — Suzanne de Treville

From Outsource In the last 20 years, we’ve seen a massive wave of manufacturing jobs move to low-labour-cost countries. Now, many companies are beginning to question whether the cost differential offered by distant suppliers compensates for the cost of working with an extended supply chain. These companies find themselves with massive inventories, yet in spite of those inventories they frequently are not able to meet all demand. It has been difficult for managers to analyse the cost differential mismatch trade-off because mismatch costs are difficult to quantify. The intuition is that the mismatch costs are high, but the managers I discuss with have difficulty believing that overstocks and stockout costs are high enough to wipe out the cost advantage enjoyed by their offshore supplier. Without solid numbers, it’s difficult for managers to incorporate these costs into decision-making. At the same time, policymakers throughout the developed world have made a commitment … Read More »The post The financial case for local manufacturing — Suzanne de Treville appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

Can't find what
you're looking for?

Contact us.

Twitter

Paul Denning
Director of Media
Relations
617.253.0576
denning@mit.edu

Patricia Favreau
Associate Director of
Media Relations
617.253.3492
pfavreau@mit.edu

©2010 MIT Sloan School of Management