Faculty Expertise Guide

When you want information on timely business topics, MIT Sloan School of Management can provide the expertise you need.

Our internationally renowned faculty and research staff explore the world's most critical business problems and share their insightful solutions through dynamic classroom discussions. This guide provides a window on the intellectual vibrancy of MIT Sloan.

The great volume of research conducted at MIT Sloan and the interests of our faculty and researchers continually evolve, so please contact Paul Denning, director of Media Relations, if you don't find what you need.

How TV can succeed in the digital age — Daniel Schiffman

From Forbes The media landscape has changed tremendously over the past year, and as we look ahead to 2016 a big question is: What is the future of TV? Television has long been the leading medium when it comes to American video consumption, but the landscape is quickly changing. Traditional TV is seeing competition from video streaming providers like Netflix and Amazon, Over-The-Top (OTT) devices such as Chromecast and Roku, and streaming content on a myriad of personal devices. While big data is a powerful tool, it hasn’t yet unseated TV from its place at the head of the pack. A Nielsen Total Audience Report for Q2 2015 shows that adults 18+ spend more than 32 hours a week watching television, giving TV a 95% share of all video viewing. As for advertising, TV is where we see the majority of spending. It’s a $72 billion-a-year industry in the U.S., … Read More »The post How TV can succeed in the digital age — Daniel Schiffman appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

The five keys to successfully negotiating your salary — Neal Hartman

From Forbes Many people find asking to be paid more money awkward. How will your request be perceived? Will you look greedy or demanding? Are you sure you’re really worth what you’re asking for? The key to answering these questions and reaching a successful outcome is preparation. Fortunately, it’s not difficult to prepare for a salary negotiation. It just takes a few simple steps. 1. Think about timing. The first step in preparing for a salary discussion is to consider timing. In general, it’s better to discuss salary after you receive a job offer rather than once you start a position. Companies generally expect there will be some negotiations before a person formally accepts a position, and assuming you have done your market research, you should be comfortable knowing the salary range and typical benefits for your position and in your location. However, many people decide to have this conversation … Read More »The post The five keys to successfully negotiating your salary — Neal Hartman appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

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