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Ernst Berndt

Ernst Berndt

Louis E. Seley Professor in Applied Economics

Department: Professor of Applied Economics

Contact: (617) 253-2665, eberndt@mit.edu

Expertise: Applied economics; Applied mathematics; Database marketing; Drug and biological regulatory strategies; Econometrics; Economics; Emerging markets; Global economics; Globalization; Health management; Industrial economics; Industrial organization; Management of technology; Medical decision making; Microeconomics; Price fixing; Probability; Research and development; Workplace health

Alessandro Bonatti

Alessandro Bonatti

Sarofim Family Career Development Professor

Department: Associate Professor of Applied Economics

Contact: (617) 253-7190, bonatti@mit.edu

Expertise: Advertising; Applied economics; Auctions; Competition; Economics; Electronic media; Europe; European Union; Game theory; Google; Industrial economics; Industrial organization; Insurance; Internet; Italy; Media; Microeconomics; Online shopping; Optimal control; Political economy; Price fixing; Pricing; Social networks; Teams; Turkey

Vivek Farias

Vivek Farias

Robert N. Noyce Career Development Professor

Department: Associate Professor of Operations Management

Contact: (617) 253-7659, vivekf@mit.edu

Expertise: Airlines; Applied probability; Decision making, decision support; Financial engineering; Mathematical programming; Operations management; Operations research

Jay Forrester

Jay Forrester

Professor Emeritus of Management

Department: System Dynamics

Contact: (617) 253-1571, jforestr@mit.edu

Expertise: Advertising; Applied economics; Automotive; Branding; Business education; Business process modeling; Consumer packaged goods; Consumer products, marketing; Corporate strategy and policy; Customer relationships and CRM; Customer satisfaction; Deflation; Distance learning; Entrepreneurship / New ventures; Environmental leadership; Environmental policy; Game theory; Information technology, impact of; Internet; K-12 education; Macroeconomics; Management of technology; Managerial economics; Market research; Marketing; Marketing strategy; Nonlinear dynamics; Positioning; Statistics; Supply chain management; System dynamics; Virtual customer; Web-based marketing

Renee Gosline

Renee Gosline

Zenon Zannetos (1955) Career Development Professor

Department: Assistant Professor of Marketing

Contact: (617) 452-4303, rgosline@mit.edu

Expertise: Advertising; Advertising; Brand management; Branding; Caribbean; Competition; Consumer behavior; Consumer marketing; Consumer packaged goods; Consumer products, marketing; Intellectual property; Luxury; Luxury; Market research; Marketing; Marketing communication; Marketing strategy; Positioning; Product loyalty; Signaling; Trust-based marketing

David Schmittlein

David Schmittlein

John C Head III Dean

Department: Professor of Marketing

Contact: (617) 253-2804, dschmitt@mit.edu

Expertise: Advertising; Applied mathematics; Applied probability; B-school; Bayesian statistics; Brand management; Branding; Business education; Consumer behavior; Customer relationships and CRM; Database marketing; Education; International marketing; Market research; Marketing; Marketing channels; Marketing strategy; Marketing, international; MBA; Online shopping; Pricing; Product development and design; Product loyalty; Retail; Sampling; Statistics; Stochastic modeling; Web-based marketing

Catherine Tucker

Catherine Tucker

Mark Hyman, Jr. Career Development Professor

Department: Associate Professor of Marketing

Contact: (617) 252-1499, cetucker@mit.edu

Expertise: Computer privacy; Credit cards; E-commerce; Econometrics; Electronic software; Google; Google; Industrial economics; Internet; Internet privacy issues; Internet telephony; Management of information technology; Marketing; Marketing strategy; Online banking; Pricing; Security of technology; Software; Web-based marketing; YouTube

Glen Urban

Glen Urban

David Austin Professor in Management, Emeritus

Department: Professor of Marketing, Emeritus

Contact: (617) 253-6615, glurban@mit.edu

Expertise: Advertising; Automotive; B-school; Bayesian statistics; Brand management; Branding; Consumer marketing; Consumer products, marketing; Customer relationships and CRM; Customer satisfaction; Customer service; Database marketing; Dot-com; E-commerce; Entrepreneurship / New ventures; Information technology for management; Internet; Internet privacy issues; Internet strategy; Knowledge management; Lead users; Market research; Marketing; Marketing strategy; Marketing, international; New ventures; Online feedback mechanisms; Online media; Online shopping; Positioning; Product loyalty; Publishing; Statistics; Telecommunications; Trust-based marketing; Web-based marketing; World Wide Web

Increasing click-through rates with ad morphing — Glen Urban and John Hauser

From Fortune China Everyone is trying to make their banner ads and new media more effective. In the banner area, 90% of the effort is spent on targeting. If you click on a link, you’ll get a particular ad. A whole industry has emerged focused on collecting click stream data and making recommendations. But that is only half the picture. Equally important is the question of how you should talk to consumers once they are targeted. This is what ad morphing is all about. For example, a car company may target a consumer whose click history indicates he is interested in buying a car. However, instead of just randomly sending him car ads, it can track the consumer’s online behavior to determine his preferred communication style. We also call this his cognitive or thinking style. Does the consumer want a picture of the car at a NASCAR race? Or would … Read More »The post Increasing click-through rates with ad morphing — Glen Urban and John Hauser appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

Understanding the implications of consumer empowerment in health care — Renée Richardson Gosline

From Huffington Post The days of the passive patient and omnipotent Marcus Welby-like physician are long gone. Since the 1990s, consumer empowerment in health care has been increasing, most notably with the advent of direct-to-consumer advertising for prescription medicines. Then, the rise of digital media allowed consumers to search symptoms and create communities around common disease experiences. More recently, the ability to shop for health insurance through health care exchanges and obtain treatment at drug store clinics has led to a new age of consumer empowerment. We’ve gone from a B-to-B model to a B-to-C model in health care. This shift in power to consumers has many implications when it comes to how we make decisions about our health care. Here are six ways that a behavioral lens can help us understand the implications of empowering consumers in health care: 1. Heuristics Heuristics are very important. These mental shortcuts or “rules of thumb” … Read More »The post Understanding the implications of consumer empowerment in health care — Renée Richardson Gosline appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

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