Search Results

Results for Advertising:

Ernst Berndt

Ernst Berndt

Louis E. Seley Professor in Applied Economics

Department: Professor of Applied Economics

Contact: (617) 253-2665, eberndt@mit.edu

Expertise: Affordable Care Act (ACA); Applied economics; Applied microeconomics; Applied probability; Biopharmaceutical; Biotechnology; Cancer; Clinical trials; Data analytics; Drug models; Econometrics; Economics; Education; Game theory; Health management; Healthcare; Healthcare industry; HIV; Industrial organization; Industrial organization; Industrial partnerships; Institutional partnerships; Intellectual property; Intellectual property; Intellectual property law; Market research; Medicaid; Medical decision making; Medical devices; Medicare; Medicine; Microeconomics; Outsourcing; Pharmaceuticals; Pricing; Regulation and policy; Sampling; Statistics; Stochastic modeling

Alessandro Bonatti

Alessandro Bonatti

Sarofim Family Career Development Professor

Department: Associate Professor of Applied Economics

Contact: (617) 253-7190, bonatti@mit.edu

Expertise: Advertising; Game theory; Industrial organization; Microeconomics

Vivek Farias

Vivek Farias

Robert N. Noyce Career Development Professor

Department: Associate Professor of Operations Management

Contact: (617) 253-7659, vivekf@mit.edu

Expertise: Airlines; Applied probability; Decision making; Financial engineering; Mathematical programming; Operations management; Operations research

Renee Gosline

Renee Gosline

Zenon Zannetos (1955) Career Development Professor

Department: Assistant Professor of Marketing

Contact: (617) 452-4303, rgosline@mit.edu

Expertise: Advertising; Apps; Blogs; Brand management; Branding; Caribbean; Consumer behavior; Consumer marketing; Consumer packaged goods; Consumer psychology; Crowdfunding; Customer Relationship Management (CRM); Customer relationships; Electronic media; Elevator pitch; Facebook; Intellectual property; Leadership; Leadership; Luxury goods; Marketing; Medical decision making; Online education; Social media; Social networks; Startups / Start-ups; Strategy; Tumblr; Twitter; United States; YouTube

John Little

John Little

Institute Professor

Department: Professor of Marketing

Contact: (617) 253-3738, jlittle@mit.edu

Expertise: Advertising; Analytics; Brand management; Branding; Channels; Consumer packaged goods; Data mining; Decision making; Decision support; Manufacturing; Manufacturing systems; Market research; Marketing; Marketing channels; Mathematical programming; Mathematical programming; Media; Operations management; Operations management; Operations research; Optimization; Pricing; Pricing; Probability; Probability, applied; Product loyalty; Sales and sales processes; Statistics

David Schmittlein

David Schmittlein

John C Head III Dean

Department: Professor of Marketing

Contact: (617) 253-2804, dschmitt@mit.edu

Catherine Tucker

Catherine Tucker

Mark Hyman, Jr. Career Development Professor

Department: Associate Professor of Marketing

Contact: (617) 252-1499, cetucker@mit.edu

Expertise: Advertising; Amazon.com; Apple; Applied economics; Applied microeconomics; Big data; Computer privacy; Consumer marketing; Convergence; Customer incentives; Digital economy; Digitalization; Digitization; Dot-com; eBay; eBay; eBusiness; eBusiness; eCommerce; eCommerce; Econometrics; Economics; eGovernment; Electronic commerce; Electronic communication; Electronic media; Electronic publishing; Facebook; Financial information technology; Flickr; Foursquare; Genetics; Genome; Google; Google; Healthcare exchanges; Hi technology companies; Hi-technology / Hi-tech; Industrial economics; Industrial organization; Industrial organization; Information technology; Instagram; Intellectual property; Intellectual property; Intellectual property; Intellectual property law; Intellectual property law; Intellectual property strategy; Internet; Internet applications; Internet governance; Internet privacy issues; Internet security; Internet strategy; iPad; iPhone; LinkedIn; Marketing; Marketing communication; Marketing strategy; Microsoft; Mobile banking; MOOCs; MOOCs; Online banking; Online education; Online education; Online feedback mechanisms; Online media; Online shopping; Pinterest; Price fixing; Price fixing; Pricing; Pricing; Privacy issues; Regulation and policy; Skype; Social influence; Social media; Social networks; Strategy; Technological innovation; Technology; Technology security; Technology strategy; Teleconferencing; Tumblr; Twitter; United Kingdom; United States; Web-based marketing; Web-based marketing; World Wide Web; Yelp

Glen Urban

Glen Urban

David Austin Professor in Management, Emeritus

Department: Professor of Marketing, Emeritus

Contact: (617) 253-6615, glurban@mit.edu

Expertise: Advertising; Automotive industry; B-school; Bayesian statistics; Brand management; Branding; Consumer marketing; Customer relationships; Customer satisfaction; Customer service; Database marketing; Dot-com; eCommerce; Electronic publishing; International marketing; Internet; Internet privacy issues; Internet strategy; Knowledge management; Lead users; Management of technology; Market research; Marketing; New ventures; Online feedback mechanisms; Online media; Onlne shopping; Positioning; Product loyalty; Statistics; Telecommunications; Trust-based marketing; Web-based marketing; World Wide Web

How branding 101 can make leaders more mindful of diversity — Renée Richardson Gosline

From The Conversation A few years ago, I overheard two of my MBA students talking after class about their “personal brands.” At the time, I was amused. But then I kept hearing more about this notion of “my brand.” I noticed it was the subject of articles in Forbes and Harvard Business Review. Suddenly, I saw book upon book devoted to the topic. The conversation centered around bolstering your personal brand by tweeting the right things, highlighting certain attributes in your LinkedIn profile and ingratiating yourself with other powerful personal brands. Frankly, I bristle at the phrase “personal brand.” We are not products, we are people. The way we present ourselves should be authentic, not part of a sales pitch or advertising campaign. But then I got to thinking: is there a way to apply branding’s best practices to develop greater leadership? By that, I don’t mean some fabricated Kardashian-type “personal brand” but rather a better understanding of how … Read More »The post How branding 101 can make leaders more mindful of diversity — Renée Richardson Gosline appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

Your Recent Searches

Can't find what
you're looking for?

Contact us.

Twitter

Paul Denning
Director of Media
Relations
617.253.0576
denning@mit.edu

Patricia Favreau
Associate Director of
Media Relations
617.253.3492
pfavreau@mit.edu

©2010 MIT Sloan School of Management