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Erik Brynjolfsson

Erik Brynjolfsson

Schussel Family Professor of Management Science

Department: Professor, Information Technology

Contact: (617) 253-4319, erikb@mit.edu

Expertise: Applied economics; Applied microeconomics; Artificial intelligence; Big data; Business intelligence; Business school; CEO compensation; Cloud computing; Competitive strategy; Computers; Crowdsourcing; Data assets; Data mining; Digital economy; Digitalization; Digitization; Dot-com; eBusiness; eBusiness; eCommerce; eCommerce; Economics; Economy; Electronic commerce; Electronic media; Electronic publishing; Enterprise information systems; Executive compensation; Future of work; Google; Information systems; Information technology; Innovation; Intellectual property; Internet; Job creation; Job creation; Labor market policy; Managerial economics; Microeconomics; Minimum wage; Mobile computing; MOOCs; MOOCs; Neural networks; Offshoring; Offshoring; Online feedback mechanisms; Online shopping; Open innovation; Political economy; Predictive analytics; Predictive analytics; Pricing; Privacy issues; Robotics; Robots; Sales force automation; Sharing economy; Sociotechnical system; Strategy; Technological innovation; Technological innovation; Technology; Unemployment; Unemployment; World Wide Web

Andrew Lo

Andrew Lo

Charles E. and Susan T. Harris Professor

Department: Professor, Finance

Contact: (617) 253-0920, andrew.lo@mit.edu

Expertise: Analyst forecasts; Angel investing; Applied economics; Applied mathematics; Applied probability; Arbitrage pricing theory; Artificial intelligence; Asset management; Asset pricing; Banking; Banking management; Banking operations and policy; Banking regulation; Bankruptcy; Bayesian networks; Bayesian statistics; Bayesian statistics; Big data; Biopharmaceutical; Biotechnology; Bond markets; Bond negotiations; Bond pricing; Business intelligence; Business plans; Cancer; Capital budgeting; Capital controls; Capital market; CEO compensation; Clinical trials; Consumer behavior; Contagion; Corporate diversification; Corporate finance; Corporate governance; Corporate strategy and policy; Currency; Cyber security; Data acquisition; Data analysis; Data mining; Decision making; Deflation; Derivatives; Disaster recovery; Distance learning; Dividend policy; Dot-com; Drug models; eCommerce; Econometrics; Economic crisis; Economics; Education; Emerging businesses; Entrepreneurial finance; Entrepreneurial management; Equities; Euro; Exchange rates; Executive compensation; Federal Reserve; Financial econometrics; Financial engineering; Financial information technology; Financial information technology; Financial markets; Financial reporting; Financial services; Financial statement analysis; Foreign investment; Futures; Government; Healthcare; Healthcare industry; Hedge funds; Hurdle rates; Inflation; Intellectual property; Intellectual property law; Interest rates; International finance; Internet privacy issues; Intertemporal choice; Investment analysis; Investment banking; Investment risk; Investment strategies; Knowledge sharing; Macroeconomics; Mathematical programming; MBA; Medical decision making; Medicine; Mergers and acquisitions; Mobile banking; MOOCs; Mortgage funds; Mutual funds; Neural networks; New venture development; New ventures; Non-linear dynamics; Online banking; Online education; Online feedback mechanisms; Operations research; Optimal control; Optimization; Options; Patents; Pensions; Personal finance; Pharmaceuticals; Portfolio choice; Portfolio design and management; Private equity; Research and development; Retirement planning; Revenue management; Risk capital; Risk management; Sampling; Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC); Security prices; Simulation; Software agents; Startups / Start-ups; Statistics; Stochastic modeling; Stock exchange; Stock exchange consolidation; Stock market; Stock options; Stock trading; Subprime lending; Trading decisions; Treasuries; Venture capital; Wall Street; Web-based marketing

Thomas Malone

Thomas Malone

Patrick J. McGovern (1959) Professor of Management

Department: Professor, Information Technology

Contact: (617) 253-6843, malone@mit.edu

Expertise: Artificial intelligence; Business process modeling; Business process modeling; Changing work environments; Changing work environments; Changing workforce; Climate change; Climate policy; Cross-sectoral collaboration; Crowdsourcing; Digital economy; Digitalization; Digitization; eBay; eBay; eBusiness; eCommerce; eGovernment; Electronic commerce; Electronic communication; Future of work; Gamification; Global climate change; Global warming; Google; Groupware; Industrial organization; Information systems; Information technology; Internet; Knowledge management; Leadership; MOOCs; MOOCs; Online education; Online education; Open source software; Organizational communications; Organizational design and performance; Organizational psychology; Organizations; Social networks; Social networks; Social psychology; Teams; Telecommuting; Virtual teams and organizations; Wikipedia; Wikipedia

Duncan Simester

Duncan Simester

NTU Professor of Marketing

Department: Professor, Marketing

Contact: (617) 258-0679, simester@mit.edu

Expertise: Channels; Marketing channels; Marketing strategy; Pricing; Retail

Scott Stern

Scott Stern

David Sarnoff Professor of Management of Technology

Department: Professor, Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management

Contact: (617) 253-3053, sstern@mit.edu

Expertise: Accelerators; Angel investing; Artificial intelligence; Business plans; Business process modeling; Competition; Crowdfunding; Crowdsourcing; Economic development; Elevator pitch; Emerging businesses; Entrepreneurial finance; Entrepreneurial management; Entrepreneurship; Franchises; Global entrepreneurship; Incubators; Initial Public Offerings (IPOs); Innovation; Innovation management; Innovative thinking; Intellectual property; Intellectual property laws; Intellectual property strategy; International entrepreneurship; Job creation; Medical devices; New venture development; New ventures; Open innovation; Patents; Product innovation; Research and development; Silicon Valley; Small business; Social entrepreneurship; Social impact; Social responsibility; Startup ecosystem; Startups / Start-ups; Strategic management; Strategic planning; Strategy; Technological innovation; Technology; Technology strategy; Technology transfer; Technology transfer; Unicorns; Venture capital

The hidden culprit behind stagnant wages – Nathan Wilmers

From The Hill Slow wage growth since the Great Recession has been puzzling. As the economic recovery has clocked eight years of growth, unemployment has dropped, but real median wages have barely increased. Commentators have looked for explanations in everything from the rise of artificial intelligence to the scarring effects of the decade-old economic crisis. However, slow U.S. wage growth has a longer history. Relative to the rapid growth marking the post-World War II period, median real wages have grown little since the 1970s (except for the economic boom of the late 1990s). A growing body of research points to the decline in worker bargaining power as a core explanation. The long membership decline of labor unions has made it harder for workers to demand higher pay. In some local labor markets, increased market concentration has left few employers able to dictate terms to workers. The real federal minimum wage … Read More » The post The hidden culprit behind stagnant wages – Nathan Wilmers appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

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