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Christopher Knittel

Christopher Knittel

George P. Shultz Professor

Department: Professor of Applied Economics

Contact: (617) 324-0015, knittel@mit.edu

Expertise: Alternative energy; Applied economics; Applied microeconomics; Bank regulation; Banking; Banking industry; Banking regulation; Carbon footprint; Clean coal; Clean energy; Climate change; Climate policy; Coal; Competitive strategy; Computational economics; Consumer behavior; Corporate strategy and policy; Credit card industry; Data analytics; Drought; Econometrics; Econometrics; Economics; Economy; Electricity; Emissions trading; Emissions trading; Energy; Energy economics; Energy efficiency; Energy finance; Environment; Environmental economics; Environmental policy; Ethanol; Financial econometrics; Fracking; Gas; Global climate change; Global warming; Hydraulic fracturing; Industrial economics; Industrial organization; Industrial organization; Managerial economics; Mergers and acquisitions; Microeconomics; Natural gas; Nonlinear optimization; Nuclear power; Oil; Oil industry; Optimization; Outsourcing; Outsourcing; Pharmaceuticals; Pricing; Product loyalty; Public utilities; Regulatory bodies; Solar power; Sports analytics; Subsidies; Sustainability; Tax reforms; Water; Wind power

John Reilly

John Reilly

Department: Senior Lecturer and Co-Director of the Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

Contact: (617) 253-8040, jreilly@mit.edu

Expertise: Alternative energy; Clean coal; Clean energy; Climate change; Climate policy; Coal; Drought; Electricity; Emissions trading; Energy; Energy economics; Energy efficiency; Environment; Environmental economics; Environmental policy; Ethanol; Fracking; Gas; Global climate change; Global warming; Hydraulic fracturing; Natural gas; Nuclear power; Oil; Water; Wind power

Has China’s coal use peaked? Hear’s how to read the tea leaves – Valerie J. Karplus

From The Conversation As the largest emitter of carbon dioxide in the world, how much coal China is burning is of global interest. In March, the country’s National Bureau of Statistics said the tonnage of coal has fallen for the second year in the row. Indeed, there are reports that China will stop construction of new plants, as the country grapples with overcapacity, and efforts to phase out inefficient and outdated coal plants are expected to continue. A sustained reduction in coal, the main fuel used to generate electricity in China, will be good news for the local environment and global climate. But it also raises questions: what is driving the drop? And can we expect this nascent trend to continue? It appears many of the forces that led coal use to slow down in recent years are here to stay. Nevertheless, uncertainties abound. The future of coal in China … Read More » The post Has China’s coal use peaked? Hear’s how to read the tea leaves – Valerie J. Karplus appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

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