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Christopher Knittel

Christopher Knittel

George P. Shultz Professor

Department: Professor, Applied Economics

Contact: (617) 324-0015, knittel@mit.edu

Expertise: Alternative energy; Applied economics; Applied microeconomics; Bank regulation; Banking; Banking industry; Banking regulation; Carbon footprint; Clean coal; Clean energy; Climate change; Climate policy; Coal; Competitive strategy; Computational economics; Consumer behavior; Corporate strategy and policy; Credit card industry; Data analytics; Drought; Econometrics; Econometrics; Economics; Economy; Electricity; Emissions trading; Emissions trading; Energy; Energy economics; Energy efficiency; Energy finance; Environment; Environmental economics; Environmental policy; Ethanol; Financial econometrics; Fracking; Gas; Global climate change; Global warming; Hydraulic fracturing; Industrial economics; Industrial organization; Industrial organization; Managerial economics; Mergers and acquisitions; Microeconomics; Natural gas; Nonlinear optimization; Nuclear power; Oil; Oil industry; Optimization; Outsourcing; Outsourcing; Pharmaceuticals; Pricing; Product loyalty; Public utilities; Regulatory bodies; Solar power; Sports analytics; Subsidies; Sustainability; Tax reforms; Water; Wind power

Richard Schmalensee

Richard Schmalensee

Howard W. Johnson Professor of Management, Emeritus

Department: Professor, Economics, Emeritus

Contact: (617) 253-2957, rschmal@mit.edu

Expertise: Alternative energy; Antitrust; Applied economics; B-school; Business education; Business school; Clean energy; Climate change; Climate policy; Competitive strategy; Corporate strategy and policy; Credit card industry; Economics; Economy; Electricity; Emissions trading; Energy; Energy economics; Environment; Environmental economics; Environmental policy; Global climate change; Global warming; Industrial economics; Industrial organization; Non-market strategy; Price fixing; Pricing; Privatization; Solar power; Strategy

Antoinette Schoar

Antoinette Schoar

Michael M. Koerner (1949) Professor of Entrepreneurship

Department: Professor, Finance

Contact: (617) 253-3763, aschoar@mit.edu

Expertise: Angel investing; Angel investing; Corporate finance; Corporate governance; Credit card industry; Developing countries; Economic development; Entrepreneurial finance; Entrepreneurship; Global entrepreneurship; International entrepreneurship; Job creation; Lead users; Subprime lending; Venture capital; Venture capital

Henry Weil

Henry Weil

Department: Senior Lecturer, Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management

Contact: (617) 258-6101, hbweil@mit.edu

Expertise: Airlines; Alliances; Asia; Aviation; Banking; Bermuda; Business process modeling; Capital budgeting; China; Competition; Competition; Competitive strategy; Computer industry; Consumer behavior; Convergence; Corporate strategy and policy; Credit card industry; Customer relationships; Customer service; Data acquisition; Digitalization; Dot-com; eCommerce; Electronic media; Emerging businesses; Emerging markets; Energy; Entrepreneurial management; Ethanol; Europe; European Union (EU); Financial services; France; Globalization; Hong Kong; Industrial economics; Information technology; Innovation; International corporate strategy; International management; Internet telephony; Lead users; Management of technology; Marketing strategy; Media; Microeconomics; Mobile computing; New ventures; Nonlinear dynamics; Oil; Online banking; Online media; Pharmaceuticals; Pricing; Research and development; Retirement planning; Singapore; Startups / Start-ups; Strategic management; Strategic planning; System dynamics; Taiwan; Technological innovation; Technological strategy; Technological transfer; Trust-based marketing; Wi-fi; Wireless communication

Wider and direct access to financial market infrastructure is the next step for a more competitive financial market – Haoxiang Zhu

From ProMarket As of Saturday, January 13, all EU member states were to fully implement the revised Payment Services Directive, known as PSD2.1) Among other things, PSD2 allows third-party payment service providers to gain access to customers’ bank accounts (with the customers’ consent, of course), and customers’ banks are required to provide API connection for identity verification. Its potential impact should not be underestimated. For example, under PSD2, customers and merchants can, in principle, cut credit cards and debit cards out of their transactions, saving significant costs along the way. In addition, banks can no longer “own” their customers’ account data or prevent competitors from accessing them. The EU’s PSD2 is a major development in payments and financial market infrastructure, a once-sleepy “back-office” function that is now alive and kicking. The essence of PSD2 is to encourage competition and reduce the information advantages of incumbent banks. Likewise, the Bank of England … Read More » The post Wider and direct access to financial market infrastructure is the next step for a more competitive financial market – Haoxiang Zhu appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

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