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Results for Crisis:

Jean-Noel Barrot

Jean-Noel Barrot

Department: Assistant Professor of Finance

Contact: (617) 715-4820, jnbarrot@mit.edu

Kristin Forbes

Kristin Forbes

Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Professor of Management

Department: Professor of Global Economics and Management

Contact: (617) 253-8996, kjforbes@mit.edu

Expertise: Capital controls; Capital flows; Contagion; Financial crises; International economics; International finance; Macroeconomics; Macroprudential regulation

Bengt Holmstrom

Bengt Holmstrom

Paul A. Samuelson Professor of Economics

Contact: (617) 253-0506, bengt@mit.edu

Simon Johnson

Simon Johnson

Ronald A. Kurtz (1954) Professor of Entrepreneurship

Department: Professor of Global Economics and Management

Contact: 617-290-9618, sjohnson@mit.edu

Expertise: Corporate governance; Economic crisis; Economics; Economy, current conditions; Entrepreneurship / New ventures; Government; New stock markets; Political economy; Sustainability; Tax policy; Trade policy; Unemployment; United States; Venture capital

Peter Kurzina

Peter Kurzina

Department: Senior Lecturer, Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship

Contact: (617) 715-4850, kurzina@mit.edu

Expertise: Crisis; Interim management; Managing adversity; Turnaround; Work-out

Andrew Lo

Andrew Lo

Charles E. and Susan T. Harris Professor

Department: Professor of Finance

Contact: (617) 253-0920, andrew.lo@mit.edu

Expertise: Analyst forecasts; Angel investing; Applied economics; Applied math; Applied probability; Arbitrage pricing theory; Artificial intelligence; Asset management and pricing; Banking; Banking management; Banking operations and policy; Banking regulation; Bankruptcy; Bayesian networks; Bayesian statistics; Bond markets; Bond negotiations; Bond pricing; Business education; Business intelligence; Business plans; Capital budgeting; Capital controls; Capital market; CEO compensation; Chat rooms, investment; Consumer behavior; Contagion; Corporate finance; Corporate governance; Corporate strategy and policy; Currency; Data acquisition; Data mining; Decision making, decision support; Deflation; Derivatives; Disaster recovery; Distance learning; Diversification, corporate; Dividend policy; Dot-com; E-commerce; Econometrics; Economic crisis; Economics; Economy, current conditions; Education; Emerging businesses; Entrepreneurial finance; Entrepreneurial management; Entrepreneurship / New ventures; Equities; Euro; Exchange rates; Executive compensation; Executive education; Federal Reserve; Financial econometrics; Financial engineering; Financial information technology; Financial markets; Financial reporting; Financial services; Financial statement analysis; Foreign investment; Futures; Government; Hedge funds; Hurdle rates; Inflation; Information technology; Information technology, artificial intelligence; Intellectual property; Intellectual property law; Interest rates; International finance; Intertemporal choice; Investment analysis; Investment banking; Investment risk; Investment strategies; Knowledge sharing; Law; Macroeconomics; Market, categorical structures in; Mathematical programming; MBA; Mergers and acquisitions; Mortgage funds; Mutual funds; Neural networks; New stock markets; New ventures; Non-linear dynamics; Online banking; Online feedback mechanisms; Operations research; Optimal control; Optimization; Options; Patents; Pensions; Personal finance; Portfolio choice; Portfolio design and management; Private equity; Probability, applied; Research and development; Research, academic; Retirement planning; Revenue management; Risk capital; Risk management; Sampling; Securities and Exchange Commission; Security prices; Simulation; Software agents; Startups; Statistics; Stochastic modeling; Stock exchange; Stock exchange consolidation; Stock market; Stock options; Stock trading; Sub-prime lending; Technology; Trading decisions; Treasuries; Valuation; Venture capital; Wall Street; Web-based marketing

Athanasios Orphanides

Athanasios Orphanides

Department: Professor of the Practice of Global Economics and Management

Contact: (617) 324-4051, athanasios.orphanides@mit.edu

Robert Pindyck

Robert Pindyck

Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi Ltd Professor in Finance and Economics

Department: Professor of Applied Economics

Contact: (617) 253-6641, rpindyck@mit.edu

Expertise: Airlines; Applied economics; Biopharmaceutical; Carbon footprint; Climate change; Competition; Credit card industry; Econometrics; Economic crisis; Economics; Economy, current conditions; Energy; Environment; Futures; Gas; Industrial economics; Macroeconomics; Managerial economics; Mergers and acquisitions; Microeconomics; Oil; Options; Options pricing, valuation; Pharmaceuticals; Price fixing; Pricing; Regulation and policy, competition; Sustainability

Roberto Rigobon

Roberto Rigobon

Society of Sloan Fellows Professor of Management

Department: Professor of Applied Economics

Contact: (617) 258-8374, rigobon@mit.edu

Expertise: Africa; Applied economics; Argentina; Asia; Banking regulation; Bond markets; Brazil; Capital market; Contagion; Currency; Deflation; Developing countries, economics; Econometrics; Economic crisis; Economics; Economy, current conditions; Emerging markets; Equities; Euro; Europe; European Union; Exchange rates; Federal Reserve; Financial markets; Financial services; Foreign investment; France; Germany; Global trade standards; Globalization; Government; Healthcare; Hong Kong; Import quotas; India; Inflation; Interest rates; International economics; International finance; International trade; Ireland; Italy; Japan; Latin America; Macroeconomics; Managerial economics; Mexico; Monetary economics; Monetary policy; Oil; Political economy; Russia; Savings rates; Securities and Exchange Commission; Singapore; Southeast Asia; Spain; Stock exchange; Stock market; Sustainability; Taiwan; Thailand; Trade policy; Treasuries; United States; Valuation

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Podcasts & Video

Intellectual Capital: Simon Johnson on the Financial Crisis, Part 2: 10/21/08

By now, the global financial crisis is something we're becoming all too familiar with. But knowing about it and knowing what to do about it are two distinctly different things. In this exclusive podcast, MIT Sloan economics expert Professor Simon Johnson provides studied insights on what the government and financial institutions need to do to turn things around. For Johnson, who recently returned to MIT after serving as chief economist at the International Monetary Fund, proper policy is a key step towards setting things right, as is strong, decisive, coordinated action.

Intellectual Capital: Simon Johnson on the Financial Crisis, Part 3: 11/13/08

By now, the global financial crisis is something we're becoming all too familiar with. But knowing about it and knowing what to do about it are two distinctly different things. In this exclusive podcast, MIT Sloan economics expert Professor Simon Johnson provides studied insights on what the government and financial institutions need to do to turn things around. For Johnson, who recently returned to MIT after serving as chief economist at the International Monetary Fund, proper policy is a key step towards setting things right, as is strong, decisive, coordinated action.

Intellectual Capital: Simon Johnson on the Financial Crisis

By now, the global financial crisis is something we're becoming all too familiar with. But knowing about it and knowing what to do about it are two distinctly different things. In this exclusive podcast, MIT Sloan economics expert Professor Simon Johnson provides studied insights on what the government and financial institutions need to do to turn things around. For Johnson, who recently returned to MIT after serving as chief economist at the International Monetary Fund, proper policy is a key step towards setting things right, as is strong, decisive, coordinated action.

Intellectual Capital: Simon Johnson on the Financial Crisis, Part 4: 02/09/09

As the Obama administration's proposed stimulus package undergoes scrutiny, MIT Sloan economist Professor Simon Johnson gives his thoughts on what the plan will and will not accomplish. In this installment of his podcast series, Johnson also addresses the state of banking and the controversial executive pay cap.

Seminar Series: Real Time Deep Dive into the Global Crisis as it Evolves 11/04/08

Nov. 4, 2008: In the second in a series of special seminars, Prof. Simon Johnson dives deep into the global economic crisis and answers questions from the MIT Sloan community.

Seminar Series: Real Time Deep Dive into the Global Crisis as it Evolves 11/18/08

Nov. 18, 2008: In the second in a series of special seminars, Prof. Simon Johnson dives deep into the global economic crisis and answers questions from the MIT Sloan community.

MIT experts analyze financial crisis, debate cures

A panel of MIT faculty experts convened Oct. 7 to discuss current economic news. The panelists focused on different aspects of the history, the present unfolding, and the likely future of the financial mess, and emphasized that the situation is far more complex -- and the long-term outcome more uncertain -- than is typically portrayed.

Leadership Amidst Crisis

In thirty years, S. D. Shibulal has seen his share of economic crises, three to be exact. But in thinking hard about the role of crises in the future for today's students, he predicts: they will occur more frequently, and will be less predictable, longer lasting and more costly.

S-Lab '09: Jakarta

It's been predicted that within 16 years, Indonesia's capital city of Jakarta could sink up to 15 feet, leading to catastrophic flooding of the area. This devastating possibility is a direct result of the lack of clean drinking water available from the city's many rivers, which has caused area residents to pump excessive amounts of ground water, leading to massive drops in the land levels. In an effort to mitigate damage and prevent disaster, work is being done to clean up Jakarta's water supply and restore the habitat. A Sustainability Lab team from MIT Sloan was among those who traveled to Jakarta to provide insights on watershed management and insuring clean water. Team member Ian Lavery, MBA '10, talks about the challenge of merging environmental management and economic priorities, and the value of system dynamics.

Solar Energy as a Major Replacement for Fossil Fuel

t took a crisis to shift Roger Angel's gaze from the stars back to Earth, but we may all benefit from his full attention, locked as it is on helping crack the problem of global warming.

Building the Next Generation Company: Innovation, Talent, Excellence

While the ongoing world economic crisis has left many business leaders sweating (or worse), John Chambers is rolling up his sleeves in anticipation of an eventual recovery. After every economic challenge, he says, Cisco has come out with dramatic gains in market share. This time won't be different, if Chambers' bets pay off.

Financial Services: Prospect for Your Future

In a lively discussion with Simon Johnson, Lawrence Fish deconstructs the near collapse of the banking system and points out the multiple factors that have contributed to the financial crisis.

13 Bankers: The Wall Street Takeover and the Next Financial Meltdown

Simon Johnson warns in a new book that a "new financial oligarchy" threatens not only the nation's economy, but its political core. In 13 Bankers: The Wall Street Takeover and the Next Financial Meltdown, Johnson, says the book provides "the back story" for the 2008 financial crisis "and for all the issues being raised now around financial reform.

Observations on the Science of Finance in the Practice of Finance

There will be a time "beyond crisis," asserts Robert C. Merton, who delves into the dense science of derivatives -- a field he has fundamentally shaped -- to explain how the vast global economic collapse has come about, and how financial innovations at the heart of the collapse could also be tools for reconstruction.

Challenges to the Global Economy

If economic analyses earned ratings like movies, this event would receive an X for extremely disturbing. Two of the field's most prominent voices spare any sugar coating in their unsettling accounts of the world's unfolding economic crisis.

Ebola: The dark side of globalization — Trond Undheim

From Fortune As upcoming goals, the United Nations should enact basic sanitation, healthcare and governance in failed or collapsing states not simply because of moral concerns, but because of our own safety concerns. You would think we would have learned to deal with globalization by now. Goods, services, people, and money, and occasionally, diseases, flow across borders at a staggering pace. Little can stop these flows. Not walls. Not presidents. Not health authorities. People, however, remain quite rooted in their local communities. So rooted that when a global health scare comes along, we only react when somebody we know, in our country, or somewhere we know well, is affected. Most people’s identity is local, not global, and not even international. Perhaps we should be glad. It gives focus. We attend to what is near. Perhaps, therefore, most of us underestimated Ebola. In Norway, nobody reacted when a nurse on volunteer duty … Read More »The post Ebola: The dark side of globalization — Trond Undheim appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

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