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William Aulet

William Aulet

Department: Senior Lecturer

Contact: (617) 253-2473, aulet@mit.edu

Expertise: $100K Entrepreneurship competition; Alternative energy; Analyst forecasts; Angel investing; Blogs; Breakthrough management; Business plans; Capital controls; Career development; Change management; Communication; Compensation; Competitive strategy; Computer; Computer-aided software; Corporate governance; Customer satisfaction; Customer service; Eastern Europe; Elevator pitch; Emerging businesses; Employee motivation; Energy; Entrepreneurial finance; Entrepreneurial management; Entrepreneurship / New ventures; Global entrepreneurship; Incentives, corporate; Innovation; Intellectual property law; International entrepreneurship; Lead users; Leadership; Management effectiveness, measuring; Managerial communication; Managing change; Marketing strategy; Mergers and acquisitions; Middle East; New ventures; Oil; Organizational communication; Pakistan; Positioning; Pricing; Real estate; Recruitment; Sales and sales processes; Sarbanes-Oxley compliance; Software; Startups; Sustainability; Technological innovation; United Arab Emirates; United Kingdom; Venture capital

Jay Forrester

Jay Forrester

Professor Emeritus of Management

Department: System Dynamics

Contact: (617) 253-1571, jforestr@mit.edu

Expertise: Advertising; Applied economics; Automotive; Branding; Business education; Business process modeling; Consumer packaged goods; Consumer products, marketing; Corporate strategy and policy; Customer relationships and CRM; Customer satisfaction; Deflation; Distance learning; Entrepreneurship / New ventures; Environmental leadership; Environmental policy; Game theory; Information technology, impact of; Internet; K-12 education; Macroeconomics; Management of technology; Managerial economics; Market research; Marketing; Marketing strategy; Nonlinear dynamics; Positioning; Statistics; Supply chain management; System dynamics; Virtual customer; Web-based marketing

John Hauser

John Hauser

Kirin Professor of Marketing

Department: Professor of Marketing

Contact: (617) 253-2929, hauser@mit.edu

Expertise: Bayesian statistics; Branding; Consumer behavior; Consumer marketing; Consumer measurement; Consumer products, marketing; Customer satisfaction; Innovation; Market research; Marketing; Positioning; Probability, applied; Product development and design; Product loyalty; Sampling; Statistics; Trust-based marketing; Virtual customer; Web-based marketing

Glen Urban

Glen Urban

David Austin Professor in Management, Emeritus

Department: Professor of Marketing, Emeritus

Contact: (617) 253-6615, glurban@mit.edu

Expertise: Advertising; Automotive; B-school; Bayesian statistics; Brand management; Branding; Consumer marketing; Consumer products, marketing; Customer relationships and CRM; Customer satisfaction; Customer service; Database marketing; Dot-com; E-commerce; Entrepreneurship / New ventures; Information technology for management; Internet; Internet privacy issues; Internet strategy; Knowledge management; Lead users; Market research; Marketing; Marketing strategy; Marketing, international; New ventures; Online feedback mechanisms; Online media; Online shopping; Positioning; Product loyalty; Publishing; Statistics; Telecommunications; Trust-based marketing; Web-based marketing; World Wide Web

Birger Wernerfelt

Birger Wernerfelt

J.C. Penney Professor of Management

Department: Professor of Marketing

Contact: (617) 253-7192, bwerner@mit.edu

Expertise: Branding; Competitive strategy; Corporate strategy and policy; Customer incentives; Customer satisfaction; Europe; Game theory; Industrial organization; Marketing strategy; Microeconomics; Research, academic; Signaling; Supply chain management

How Corporate America can create better jobs — Thomas Kochan

From Fortune In the 1987 movie Wall Street, Gordon Gekko’s memorable pronouncement that “greed is good” epitomized the worst features of American corporations that focus only on maximizing immediate shareholder returns without regard to the impact on their employees, customers, or communities. That corporate caricature has continued to prevail. But recently, people ranging from Harvard University Business School Professor Michael Porter to leaders of the Sloan, Ford, Aspen, Hitachi (more here) and other foundations are putting forward the case that companies can provide great returns to shareholders and great jobs for employees. They point to companies such as Southwest Airlines (LUV) that for years have produced industry-leading profits, strong customer satisfaction ratings, and placement on Fortune and other lists as among the 100 best places to work. Kaiser Permanente is a similar operation in health care, as is Integrated Packaging in small-scale manufacturing; SAS in software services, as well as Costco (COST) or Wegmans in retail. The list … Read More »The post How Corporate America can create better jobs — Thomas Kochan appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

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