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Sharmila Chatterjee

Sharmila Chatterjee

Department: Academic Head, Enterprise Management Track Senior Lecturer, Marketing

Contact: (617) 253-8214, schatterjee@mit.edu

Expertise: Brand management; Business intelligence; Business intelligence; Business plans; Channel management; Channels; Competition; Competitive strategy; Competitive strategy; Customer Relationship Management (CRM); Customer relationships; Customer satisfaction; Customer service; Education; Executive education; International marketing; Market research; Marketing; Marketing channels; Marketing communication; Marketing strategy; MBA; Positioning; Pricing; Product design; Product development; Product loyalty; Public relations; Retail; Sales; Sales and sales processes; Sales and sales processes; Sales force automation; Trust-based marketing

Elaine Chen

Elaine Chen

Department: Senior Lecturer

Contact: , eychen@mit.edu

Expertise: Business plans; Entrepreneurial management; Entrepreneurship; Hi technology companies; Hi-technology / Hi-tech; Innovation; Innovation management; Innovative thinking; Intellectual property; Intellectual property; Leadership; Leadership; Management of technology; Manufacturing management; Market research; New venture development; New ventures; Open innovation; Patents; Positioning; Product design; Product development; Product innovation; Research and development; Robotics; Robots; Software engineering; Startups / Start-ups; Technological innovation; Technological innovation; Technology; Technology strategy

Court Chilton

Court Chilton

Department: Senior Lecturer

Contact: (617) 253-2212, cchilton@mit.edu

Expertise: Action learning; Business education; Business school; Change management; Competitive strategy; Consulting; Customer relationships; Customer satisfaction; Customer service; Distributed leadership; Education; Employee motivation; Executive education; Executive education; Leadership; Leadership; Leadership; Management education; Marketing communication; Motivation; Negotiation; Organizational communications; Organizational culture; Sales and sales processes; Social networks; Strategy; Training; Training programs

Lou Shipley

Lou Shipley

Department: Lecturer

Contact: , shipley@MIT.EDU

Expertise: Angel investing; Asia; Asia Pacific; B-school; Bank regulation; Banking industry; Banking operations and policy; Banking regulation; Big data; Blogs; Blogs; Business education; Business intelligence; Business plans; Business school; Business-to-business marketing; Career development; CEO compensation; Change management; China; Cloud computing; Cloud storage; Compensation; Competition; Competitive strategy; Competitive strategy; Component software technologies; Corporate governance; Corporate governance; Corporate governance; Corporate governance; Corporate strategy and policy; Cross-cultural awareness; Customer incentives; Customer Relationship Management (CRM); Customer relationships; Customer satisfaction; Customer service; Cyber security; Data analysis; Data assets; Data management; Data mining; Data mining; Database marketing; Economic history; Email; Emerging markets; Employee motivation; Enterprise information systems; Entrepreneurial finance; Entrepreneurial management; Entrepreneurship; Europe; European Union (EU); Financial information technology; Financial information technology; Global business practices; Global entrepreneurship; Hi technology companies; Hi-technology / Hi-tech; Hiring; Incentives; Information systems; Information technology; Initial Public Offerings (IPOs); Innovation; Innovation management; Innovative thinking; Intellectual property; Intellectual property; Intellectual property; Intellectual property; Intellectual property law; Intellectual property strategy; International communication; International corporate strategy; International entrepreneurship; International management; Internet security; Internet software; Inventory; Investment policy; Investor relations; Japan; Job creation; Job creation; Knowledge management; Knowledge management; Knowledge sharing; Leadership; Leadership; Leadership; Legacy information systems; LinkedIn; Logistics; Macroeconomics; Management control; Management of information technology; Management of technology; Managerial economics; Managerial vision; Marketing; Marketing communication; Marketing strategy; Mergers and acquisitions; Mobile banking; Mobile computing; Motivation; Networking; Online banking; Open innovation; Open source software; Optimization; Organizational change; Organizational communication; Organizational communications; Organizational culture; Product innovation; Product loyalty; Product management; Product strategy; Productivity; Recruitment; Regulation; Regulation and policy; Reporting; Risk management; Risk management; Sales; Sales and sales processes; Sales force automation; Sales force management; Sharing economy; Sharing economy; Silicon Valley; Silicon Valley; Social business; Social influence; Social media; Social networks; Social networks; Social networks; Social networks; Software; Software engineering; South Korea; Startups / Start-ups; Strategic management; Strategic planning; Strategy; Supply chain management; Talent management; Teams; Technological innovation; Technological innovation; Technological innovation; Technology; Technology security; Technology strategy; United Kingdom; United States; Venture capital; Venture capital; Virtual customer; Web-based marketing; Web-based marketing; World Wide Web

Glen Urban

Glen Urban

David Austin Professor in Management, Emeritus

Department: Professor of Marketing, Emeritus

Contact: (617) 253-6615, glurban@mit.edu

Expertise: Advertising; Automotive industry; B-school; Bayesian statistics; Brand management; Branding; Consumer marketing; Customer relationships; Customer satisfaction; Customer service; Database marketing; Dot-com; eCommerce; Electronic publishing; International marketing; Internet; Internet privacy issues; Internet strategy; Knowledge management; Lead users; Management of technology; Market research; Marketing; New ventures; Online feedback mechanisms; Online media; Onlne shopping; Positioning; Product loyalty; Statistics; Telecommunications; Trust-based marketing; Web-based marketing; World Wide Web

Henry Weil

Henry Weil

Department: Senior Lecturer, Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management

Contact: (617) 258-6101, hbweil@mit.edu

Expertise: Airlines; Alliances; Asia; Aviation; Banking; Bermuda; Business process modeling; Capital budgeting; China; Competition; Competition; Competitive strategy; Computer industry; Consumer behavior; Convergence; Corporate strategy and policy; Credit card industry; Customer relationships; Customer service; Data acquisition; Digitalization; Dot-com; eCommerce; Electronic media; Emerging businesses; Emerging markets; Energy; Entrepreneurial management; Ethanol; Europe; European Union (EU); Financial services; France; Globalization; Hong Kong; Industrial economics; Information technology; Innovation; International corporate strategy; International management; Internet telephony; Lead users; Management of technology; Marketing strategy; Media; Microeconomics; Mobile computing; New ventures; Nonlinear dynamics; Oil; Online banking; Online media; Pharmaceuticals; Pricing; Research and development; Retirement planning; Singapore; Startups / Start-ups; Strategic management; Strategic planning; System dynamics; Taiwan; Technological innovation; Technological strategy; Technological transfer; Trust-based marketing; Wi-Fi; Wireless communication

Birger Wernerfelt

Birger Wernerfelt

J.C. Penney Professor of Management

Department: Professor of Marketing

Contact: (617) 253-7192, bwerner@mit.edu

Expertise: Branding; Channel management; Competitive strategy; Corporate diversification; Corporate diversification; Customer incentives; eBusiness; eCommerce; Managerial economics; Marketing channels; Marketing strategy; Outsourcing; Outsourcing; Sales force management

How Wal-Mart can secure the American Dream for millennials — Thomas A. Kochan

From Fortune It’s time all stakeholders — employees, business leaders, government officials, and educators — have a serious discussion about how the nation can create better jobs for the next generation. Wal-Mart has been getting good press recently for its decision to raise its associates’ wages to a minimum of $9 per hour. And it should. So should the unions and community groups that have been pressuring the U.S. retailer to do just that. They also deserve some of the credit for exposing Wal-Mart’s low wages, reliance of associates on food stamps and other public assistance, anti-union tactics, and bottom of the industry ratings on customer service and employee satisfaction. But all those who had a hand in generating this action should see it as only the first step in what will need to be a long and multi-faceted strategy if Wal-Mart and its protagonists, and most of all its associates, are to one … Read More »The post How Wal-Mart can secure the American Dream for millennials — Thomas A. Kochan appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

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