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Alberto Cavallo

Alberto Cavallo

Cecil and Ida Green Career Development Professor

Department: Assistant Professor of Applied Economics

Contact: (617) 715-4837, afc@mit.edu

Expertise: Applied economics; Big data; Central banks; Data analysis; Data analytics; Data management; Data mining; Deflation; Developing countries; Developing countries, economics; Economic crisis; Emerging markets; Exchange rates; Federal Reserve; Global economics; Inflation; International economics; Macroeconomics; Monetary economics; Monetary policy; Online shopping; Pricing; Pricing; Statistics

Bengt Holmstrom

Bengt Holmstrom

Paul A. Samuelson Professor of Economics

Contact: (617) 253-0506, bengt@mit.edu

Expertise: Alliances; Apple; Apple; Applied economics; Applied microeconomics; Bank capital; Banking; Business school; Capital market; Capital markets; Central banks; CEO compensation; CEO compensation; Compensation; Compensation; Competition; Competitive strategy; Contagion; Contracting; Corporate diversification; Corporate finance; Corporate governance; Corporate governance; Corporate governance; Corporate governance; Corporate governance; Corporate incentives; Debt; Debt ceiling; Debt contracts; Decision analysis; Deflation; Earnings manipulation; Economics; Economy; Education; Entrepreneurial finance; Entrepreneurship; Equities; Euro; European Union (EU); Eurozone; Executive compensation; Executive compensation; Executive pay; Family business; Federal Reserve; Finance; Financial markets; Financial regulation; Financial reporting; Future of work; Game theory; Global economics; Globalization; Great Recession; Hi-technology / Hi-tech; Incentives; Incubators; Information technology; Innovation; Investment analysis; Leadership; Liquidity; Managerial economics; Managerial economics; Managerial vision; Microeconomics; Microeconomics; Monetary policy; Motivation; Motivation; Organizational design and performance; Organizational studies; Organizations; Outsourcing; Performance measurement systems; Scandinavia; Securitization; Signaling; Smartphones; Stock market; Stock options; Strategy; Technological innovation; United States; Venture capital; Venture capital; Wireless communication

Andrew Lo

Andrew Lo

Charles E. and Susan T. Harris Professor

Department: Professor of Finance

Contact: (617) 253-0920, andrew.lo@mit.edu

Expertise: Analyst forecasts; Angel investing; Applied economics; Applied mathematics; Applied probability; Arbitrage pricing theory; Artificial intelligence; Asset management; Asset pricing; Banking; Banking management; Banking operations and policy; Banking regulation; Bankruptcy; Bayesian networks; Bayesian statistics; Bayesian statistics; Big data; Biopharmaceutical; Biotechnology; Bond markets; Bond negotiations; Bond pricing; Business intelligence; Business plans; Cancer; Capital budgeting; Capital controls; Capital market; CEO compensation; Clinical trials; Consumer behavior; Contagion; Corporate diversification; Corporate finance; Corporate governance; Corporate strategy and policy; Currency; Cyber security; Data acquisition; Data analysis; Data mining; Decision making; Deflation; Derivatives; Disaster recovery; Distance learning; Dividend policy; Dot-com; Drug models; eCommerce; Econometrics; Economic crisis; Economics; Education; Emerging businesses; Entrepreneurial finance; Entrepreneurial management; Equities; Euro; Exchange rates; Executive compensation; Federal Reserve; Financial econometrics; Financial engineering; Financial information technology; Financial information technology; Financial markets; Financial reporting; Financial services; Financial statement analysis; Foreign investment; Futures; Government; Healthcare; Healthcare industry; Hedge funds; Hurdle rates; Inflation; Intellectual property; Intellectual property law; Interest rates; International finance; Internet privacy issues; Intertemporal choice; Investment analysis; Investment banking; Investment risk; Investment strategies; Knowledge sharing; Macroeconomics; Mathematical programming; MBA; Medical decision making; Medicine; Mergers and acquisitions; Mobile banking; MOOCs; Mortgage funds; Mutual funds; Neural networks; New venture development; New ventures; Non-linear dynamics; Online banking; Online education; Online feedback mechanisms; Operations research; Optimal control; Optimization; Options; Patents; Pensions; Personal finance; Pharmaceuticals; Portfolio choice; Portfolio design and management; Private equity; Research and development; Retirement planning; Revenue management; Risk capital; Risk management; Sampling; Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC); Security prices; Simulation; Software agents; Startups / Start-ups; Statistics; Stochastic modeling; Stock exchange; Stock exchange consolidation; Stock market; Stock options; Stock trading; Subprime lending; Trading decisions; Treasuries; Venture capital; Wall Street; Web-based marketing

Athanasios Orphanides

Athanasios Orphanides

Department: Professor of the Practice of Global Economics and Management

Contact: (617) 324-4051, athanasios.orphanides@mit.edu

Expertise: Bank capital; Bank regulation; Banking; Banking industry; Banking management; Banking operations and policy; Banking regulation; Bond markets; Central banks; Currency; Currency; Currency management; Debt; Deflation; Depression; Equities; Euro; Europe; European Union (EU); Eurozone; Exchange rates; Federal Reserve; Fiscal austerity; Fiscal policies; Global economics; Great Recession; Inflation; Interest rates; International economics; Macroeconomics; Monetary economics; Monetary policy; Political economy; Recession; Regulatory bodies; Stock market; Treasuries; United States

Roberto Rigobon

Roberto Rigobon

Society of Sloan Fellows Professor of Management

Department: Professor of Applied Economics

Contact: (617) 258-8374, rigobon@mit.edu

Expertise: Applied economics; Applied microeconomics; Argentina; Asia Pacific; Austerity; Bank capital; Bank regulation; Banking; Banking industry; Banking regulation; Big data; Bitcoin; Brazil; Canada; Chile; China; Corporate governance; Currency; Data analysis; Data analytics; Data mining; Debt ceiling; Deflation; Depression; Developing countries; Developing countries, economics; eBusiness; eBusiness; eCommerce; Econometrics; Econometrics; Economic crisis; Economics; Economy; eGovernment; Emerging markets; Euro; Europe; European Union (EU); Eurozone; Exchange rates; Exports; Federal Reserve; Financial econometrics; Financial engineering; Fiscal austerity; Fiscal cliff; Fiscal policies; France; Germany; Global economics; Global entrepreneurship; Globalization; Great Recession; Hong Kong; India; Inflation; Interest rates; International economics; International finance; International finance; International management; International trade; Internationalization; Intertemporal choice; Investment policy; Ireland; Italy; Japan; Job creation; Korea; Latin America; Macroeconomics; Managerial economics; Mexico; Monetary economics; Monetary policy; Offshoring; Oil; Online feedback mechanisms; Optimal control; Outsourcing; Political economy; Pricing; Recession; Singapore; Social business; Social media; Social networks; Social Security; South Korea; Southeast Asia; Spain; Statistics; Stimulus; Stochastic modeling; Subsidies; Sustainability; Taiwan; Tax reforms; Technological innovation; Technology transfer; Thailand; Trade policy; Unemployment; United Kingdom; United States

Lester Thurow

Lester Thurow

Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Professor of Management and Economics Emeritus

Department: Coordinator, Asia-Pacific Initiatives

Contact: (617) 253-2932, lthurow@mit.edu

Expertise: Applied economics; Deflation; Depression; Economic crisis; Economics; Global economics; Globalization; Innovation; Innovative thinking; Intellectual property; International economics; Macroeconomics

Japan is still in Deflation — Roberto Rigobon

From Nikkei (published 10/21/14) Next week is a big week for those keeping track of the success of Japanese economic policies. New interest rate numbers will be released on October 29 and these numbers represent the most current report card on Abenomics, as the policies of Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe are called. Abenomics was presented just weeks after Abe took office in 2012 as the ultimate solution to almost two decades of stagnation in the country.  The program has three pillars: monetary easing, structural reforms and renewed fiscal stimulus. One of the most important goals of Abenomics is increasing inflation, and ultimately changing inflation expectations—hoping to reverse a decade of deflation. To do so, the government began printing Yens in abundance. Initial signs of success showed in the exchange rate, asset prices, and inflation rate. In fact, the official CPI for July 2014 shows a large annual inflation rate … Read More »The post Japan is still in Deflation — Roberto Rigobon appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

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