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Christopher Knittel

Christopher Knittel

George P. Schultz Professor

Department: Professor of Applied Economics

Contact: (617) 324-0015, knittel@mit.edu

Expertise: Alternative energy; Applied economics; Applied microeconomics; Bank regulation; Banking; Banking industry; Banking regulation; Carbon footprint; Clean coal; Clean energy; Climate change; Climate policy; Coal; Competitive strategy; Computational economics; Consumer behavior; Corporate strategy and policy; Credit card industry; Data analytics; Drought; Econometrics; Econometrics; Economics; Economy; Electricity; Emissions trading; Emissions trading; Energy; Energy Economics; Energy efficiency; Energy finance; Environment; Environmental Economics; Environmental policy; Ethanol; Financial econometrics; Fracking; Gas; Global climate change; Global warming; Hydraulic fracturing; Industrial economics; Industrial Organization; Industrial organization; Managerial economics; Mergers and acquisitions; Microeconomics; Natural gas; Nonlinear optimization; Nuclear power; Oil; Oil industry; Optimization; Outsourcing; Outsourcing; Pharmaceuticals; Pricing; Product loyalty; Public utilities; Regulatory bodies; Solar power; Sports analytics; Subsidies; Sustainability; Tax reforms; Water; Wind power

Georgia Perakis

Georgia Perakis

William F. Pounds Professor of Management

Department: Professor of Operations Research and Operations Management

Contact: (617) 253-8277, georgiap@mit.edu

Expertise: Big data; Electricity; Inventory; Logistics; Mathematical programming; Mathematical programming; Online shopping; Operations management; Operations research; Optimal control; Optimization; Pricing; Pricing; Retail; Revenue management; Sampling; Service industry; Social networks; Social networks; Statistics; Subsidies; Supply chain management; Sustainability; United Kingdom; United States

John Reilly

John Reilly

Department: Senior Lecturer and Co-Director of the Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

Contact: (617) 253-8040, jreilly@mit.edu

Expertise: Alternative energy; Clean coal; Clean energy; Climate change; Climate policy; Coal; Drought; Electricity; Emissions trading; Energy; Energy economics; Energy efficiency; Environment; Environmental economics; Environmental policy; Ethanol; Fracking; Gas; Global climate change; Global warming; Hydraulic fracturing; Natural gas; Nuclear power; Oil; Water; Wind power

Cynthia Rudin

Cynthia Rudin

Contact: (617) 715-4215, rudin@mit.edu

Expertise: Algorithms; Algorithms; Algorithms; Analytics; Applied math; Artificial intelligence; Artificial intelligence; Bayesian statistics; Big data; Business intelligence; Business intelligence; Data analysis; Data analytics; Data mining; Data mining; Data mining; Data mining; Decision making; Decision support; Electricity; Machine learning; Medical decision making; Predictive analytics; Predictive analytics; Probability; Sports analytics; Statistics; Statistics

Richard Schmalensee

Richard Schmalensee

Howard W. Johnson Professor of Management, Emeritus

Department: Professor of Economics, Emeritus

Contact: (617) 253-2957, rschmal@mit.edu

Expertise: Alternative energy; Antitrust; Applied economics; B-school; Business education; Business school; Clean energy; Climate change; Climate policy; Competitive strategy; Corporate strategy and policy; Credit card industry; Economics; Economy; Electricity; Emissions trading; Energy; Energy economics; Environment; Environmental economics; Environmental policy; Global climate change; Global warming; Industrial economics; Industrial organization; Non-market strategy; Price fixing; Pricing; Privatization; Solar power; Strategy

Pricing solar so it doesn’t raise everyone’s energy rates — Richard Schmalensee

From The Boston Globe Despite its recent growth, solar power remains an expensive energy alternative and accounts for only a small percentage of electricity generation in Massachusetts. If the state is going to make sharp reductions in carbon emissions as well as enjoy healthy economic growth, solar generation will have to be greatly expanded. But given the already high cost of electricity in Massachusetts, it is critical to obtain solar power as cost-effectively as possible to ensure that all consumers benefit. In a recent study, an MIT team that I led presented a set of policy changes to make solar more affordable. The study shows that because of current policies, we are paying a good deal more for solar electricity than we need to. Residential solar systems are significantly more expensive per unit of capacity than utility-scale systems — about 70 percent more expensive on a levelized-cost basis. In addition, … Read More »The post Pricing solar so it doesn’t raise everyone’s energy rates — Richard Schmalensee appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

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