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Thomas Kochan

Thomas Kochan

George Maverick Bunker Professor of Management

Department: Professor of Work and Employment Research and Engineering Systems

Contact: (617) 253-6689, tkochan@mit.edu

Expertise: 401K plans; Benefits; Career development; Changing work environments; Changing workforce; Collective bargaining; Compensation; Disrupted work; Diversity; Employee motivation; Employment relations; Family issues; Firing; Flextime; Gender issues, workplace; Harassment; Hiring; Human resource management; Incentives, corporate; Industrial relations; Labor market policy; Labor relations; Labor unions; Management effectiveness, measuring; Managing diversity; Negotiation and conflict resolution; Pensions; Public policy, employment relations; Recruitment; Regulatory policy; Sexual harassment; Stock options; Telecommuting; Training programs; Tri-sector collaboration; Turnover; Unemployment; Work-life balance; Worker / Management relations; Working virtually; Workplace health

Paul Osterman

Paul Osterman

Nanyang Technological University Professor

Department: Professor of Human Resources and Management

Contact: (617) 253-2667, osterman@mit.edu

Expertise: Career development; Changing work environments; Changing workforce; Collective bargaining; Compensation; Competition; Diversity; Downsizing; Economy, current conditions; Employee motivation; Employment relations; Firing; Future of work; Hiring; Human resource management; Industrial relations; Labor market policy; Labor unions; Managing diversity; Negotiation and conflict resolution; Non-profits; Public policy, employment relations; Recruitment; Spain; Unemployment; Urban poverty

How Corporate America can create better jobs — Thomas Kochan

From Fortune In the 1987 movie Wall Street, Gordon Gekko’s memorable pronouncement that “greed is good” epitomized the worst features of American corporations that focus only on maximizing immediate shareholder returns without regard to the impact on their employees, customers, or communities. That corporate caricature has continued to prevail. But recently, people ranging from Harvard University Business School Professor Michael Porter to leaders of the Sloan, Ford, Aspen, Hitachi (more here) and other foundations are putting forward the case that companies can provide great returns to shareholders and great jobs for employees. They point to companies such as Southwest Airlines (LUV) that for years have produced industry-leading profits, strong customer satisfaction ratings, and placement on Fortune and other lists as among the 100 best places to work. Kaiser Permanente is a similar operation in health care, as is Integrated Packaging in small-scale manufacturing; SAS in software services, as well as Costco (COST) or Wegmans in retail. The list … Read More »The post How Corporate America can create better jobs — Thomas Kochan appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

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