Search Results

Results for Offshoring:

Erik Brynjolfsson

Erik Brynjolfsson

Schussel Family Professor of Management Science

Department: Professor of Information Technology

Contact: (617) 253-4319, erikb@mit.edu

Expertise: Applied economics; Applied microeconomics; Artificial intelligence; Big data; Business intelligence; Business school; CEO compensation; Cloud computing; Competitive strategy; Computers; Crowdsourcing; Data assets; Data mining; Digital economy; Digitalization; Digitization; Dot-com; eBusiness; eBusiness; eCommerce; eCommerce; Economics; Economy; Electronic commerce; Electronic media; Electronic publishing; Enterprise information systems; Executive compensation; Future of work; Google; Information systems; Information technology; Innovation; Intellectual property; Internet; Job creation; Job creation; Labor market policy; Managerial economics; Microeconomics; Minimum wage; Mobile computing; MOOCs; MOOCs; Neural networks; Offshoring; Offshoring; Online feedback mechanisms; Online shopping; Open innovation; Political economy; Predictive analytics; Predictive analytics; Pricing; Privacy issues; Robotics; Robots; Sales force automation; Sharing economy; Sociotechnical system; Strategy; Technological innovation; Technological innovation; Technology; Unemployment; Unemployment; World Wide Web

Michael Cusumano

Michael Cusumano

Sloan Management Review Distinguished Professor of Management

Department: Professor of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management and Engineering Systems

Contact: (617) 253-2574, cusumano@mit.edu

Expertise: Accelerators; Angel investing; Apple; Apps; Apps; Big data; Blackberry; Business intelligence; Business plans; CEO compensation; China; Cloud computing; Competitive strategy; Computer industry; Computer privacy; Computers; Conflicts of interest; Consumer electronics; Corporate diversification; Corporate governance; Corporate strategy and policy; Cultural differences; Digital economy; Entrepreneurial management; Entrepreneurship; Executive compensation; Executive pay; Facebook; Global entrepreneurship; Globalization; Google; Incubators; India; Initial Public Offerings (IPOs); Innovation; Innovation management; Innovative thinking; International corporate strategy; International entrepreneurship; International management; Internet; Internet applications; Internet software; Japan; Korea; LinkedIn; Mergers and acquisitions; Microsoft; Mobile computing; MOOCs; MOOCs; New venture development; New ventures; Offshoring; Product innovation; Research and development; Sharing economy; Silicon Valley; Silicon Valley; Smartphones; Software; Software engineering; Startups / Start-ups; Strategic management; Strategic planning; Strategy; Technological innovation; Technological innovation; Technological innovation; Technology; Technology strategy; Technology transfer; Technology transfer; Telecommunications; Twitter; Venture capital; World Wide Web

Robert Gibbons

Robert Gibbons

Sloan Distinguished Professor of Management

Department: Professor of Applied Economics

Contact: (617) 253-0283, rgibbons@mit.edu

Expertise: Alliances; Contracting; Game theory; Healthcare delivery; Healthcare operations management; Incentives; International corporate strategy; Management control; Mergers and acquisitions; Offshoring; Organizational change; Organizational culture; Organizational design and performance; Organizations; Outsourcing; Outsourcing; Performance measurement systems; Productivity; Sales force management; Supply chain contracts

Roberto Rigobon

Roberto Rigobon

Society of Sloan Fellows Professor of Management

Department: Professor of Applied Economics

Contact: (617) 258-8374, rigobon@mit.edu

Expertise: Applied economics; Applied microeconomics; Argentina; Asia Pacific; Austerity; Bank capital; Bank regulation; Banking; Banking industry; Banking regulation; Big data; Bitcoin; Brazil; Canada; Chile; China; Corporate governance; Currency; Data analysis; Data analytics; Data mining; Debt ceiling; Deflation; Depression; Developing countries; Developing countries, economics; eBusiness; eBusiness; eCommerce; Econometrics; Econometrics; Economic crisis; Economics; Economy; eGovernment; Emerging markets; Euro; Europe; European Union (EU); Eurozone; Exchange rates; Exports; Federal Reserve; Financial econometrics; Financial engineering; Fiscal austerity; Fiscal cliff; Fiscal policies; France; Germany; Global economics; Global entrepreneurship; Globalization; Great Recession; Hong Kong; India; Inflation; Interest rates; International economics; International finance; International finance; International management; International trade; Internationalization; Intertemporal choice; Investment policy; Ireland; Italy; Japan; Job creation; Korea; Latin America; Macroeconomics; Managerial economics; Mexico; Monetary economics; Monetary policy; Offshoring; Oil; Online feedback mechanisms; Optimal control; Outsourcing; Political economy; Pricing; Recession; Singapore; Social business; Social media; Social networks; Social Security; South Korea; Southeast Asia; Spain; Statistics; Stimulus; Stochastic modeling; Subsidies; Sustainability; Taiwan; Tax reforms; Technological innovation; Technology transfer; Thailand; Trade policy; Unemployment; United Kingdom; United States

Why it’s time to bring manufacturing back home to the U.S. — Thomas Roemer

From Forbes In the last decade, we’ve lost millions of manufacturing jobs to outsourcing. According to U.S. News and World Report, there are now 5.1 million fewer American manufacturing jobs than in 2001. The lure of low wages, tax advantages, and other cost savings has made for a seemingly straightforward calculus, and manufacturer after manufacturer, supported by intricate spreadsheets, has abandoned ship, until offshoring has become the emerging mantra of the new millennium. U.S. companies that still manufactured locally have slowly become outliers. Interestingly, this dynamic now seems to be changing, as we’re beginning to see more manufacturing in the U.S. Total output from American manufacturing relative to gross domestic product is back to pre-recession levels, with more than half a million new jobs. According to the Reshoring Initiative, 15% of this job growth results from reshoring alone. There are many reasons for this shift back to the U.S. More bang for the buck. The first has to do … Read More »The post Why it’s time to bring manufacturing back home to the U.S. — Thomas Roemer appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

Your Recent Searches

Can't find what
you're looking for?

Contact us.

Twitter

Paul Denning
Director of Media
Relations
617.253.0576
denning@mit.edu

Patricia Favreau
Associate Director of
Media Relations
617.253.3492
pfavreau@mit.edu

©2010 MIT Sloan School of Management