Search Results

Results for Regulatory policy:

Matthew Amengual

Matthew Amengual

Maurice F. Strong Career Development Professor

Department: Associate Professor

Contact: (617) 253-9410, amengual@mit.edu

Expertise: Global standards; Labor standards; Latin America; Regulatory policy; Sustainability

Christopher Knittel

Christopher Knittel

George P. Schultz Professor

Department: Professor of Applied Economics

Contact: (617) 324-0015, knittel@mit.edu

Expertise: Alternative energy; Applied economics; Applied microeconomics; Bank regulation; Banking; Banking industry; Banking regulation; Carbon footprint; Clean coal; Clean energy; Climate change; Climate policy; Coal; Competitive strategy; Computational economics; Consumer behavior; Corporate strategy and policy; Credit card industry; Data analytics; Drought; Econometrics; Econometrics; Economics; Economy; Electricity; Emissions trading; Emissions trading; Energy; Energy Economics; Energy efficiency; Energy finance; Environment; Environmental Economics; Environmental policy; Ethanol; Financial econometrics; Fracking; Gas; Global climate change; Global warming; Hydraulic fracturing; Industrial economics; Industrial Organization; Industrial organization; Managerial economics; Mergers and acquisitions; Microeconomics; Natural gas; Nonlinear optimization; Nuclear power; Oil; Oil industry; Optimization; Outsourcing; Outsourcing; Pharmaceuticals; Pricing; Product loyalty; Public utilities; Regulatory bodies; Solar power; Sports analytics; Subsidies; Sustainability; Tax reforms; Water; Wind power

Athanasios Orphanides

Athanasios Orphanides

Department: Professor of the Practice of Global Economics and Management

Contact: (617) 324-4051, athanasios.orphanides@mit.edu

Expertise: Bank capital; Bank regulation; Banking; Banking industry; Banking management; Banking operations and policy; Banking regulation; Bond markets; Central banks; Currency; Currency; Currency management; Debt; Deflation; Depression; Equities; Euro; Europe; European Union (EU); Eurozone; Exchange rates; Federal Reserve; Fiscal austerity; Fiscal policies; Global economics; Great Recession; Inflation; Interest rates; International economics; Macroeconomics; Monetary economics; Monetary policy; Political economy; Recession; Regulatory bodies; Stock market; Treasuries; United States

John Parsons

John Parsons

Department: Senior Lecturer / MBA Program Finance Track Head

Contact: (617) 324-3745, jparsons@mit.edu

Expertise: Capital budgeting; Climate policy; Corporate diversification; Corporate finance; Corporate strategy and policy; Derivatives; Dividend policy; Emissions trading; Energy; Environment; Environmental economics; Environmental policy; Finance; Financial engineering; Financial markets; Gas; Hurdle rates; Nuclear power; Oil; Public utilities; Risk management; Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)

Andrew Sutherland

Andrew Sutherland

Department: Assistant Professor of Accounting

Contact: (617) 324-3894, AGS1@MIT.EDU

Expertise: Accounting standards; Auditing; Bank regulation; Banking; Banking industry; Banking regulation; Bankruptcy; Bankruptcy; Contracting; Corporate diversification; Corporate finance; Debt; Debt contracts; Economic crisis; Entrepreneurial finance; Entrepreneurial finance; Entrepreneurial management; Entrepreneurship; Financial institutions; Financial regulation; Financial reporting; Financial reporting; Microeconomics; Regulation and policy; Regulatory bodies; Reporting; Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)

Chintan Vaishnav

Chintan Vaishnav

Department: Senior Lecturer

Contact: , chintanv@MIT.EDU

How Obamacare inadvertently threatens the financial health of small businesses, and what states should do about it — Robert Pozen

From Forbes Starting in 2016, push comes to shove for small businesses under the Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare. As of January 1, small businesses, broadly defined as firms with 50 to 100 full-time employees, must comply with the ACA’s employer mandate and provide qualified health insurance to their workers or face stiff penalties. But this requirement poses a big threat to the financial stability of small employers—and not for the reasons you might think. Obamacare includes a myriad of regulatory incentives and exemptions that define the parameters of the employer mandate. However, these have inadvertent consequences. Most important, exemptions in the ACA encourage small firms to self-finance their health care plans—that is, pay their workers’ health care bills directly, rather than covering them through a traditional insurance policy. Most large companies in America (above 3,000 employees) engage in self-funding, but that is done now by only about 16% of small companies of between … Read More »The post How Obamacare inadvertently threatens the financial health of small businesses, and what states should do about it — Robert Pozen appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

Your Recent Searches

Can't find what
you're looking for?

Contact us.

Twitter

Paul Denning
Director of Media
Relations
617.253.0576
denning@mit.edu

Patricia Favreau
Associate Director of
Media Relations
617.253.3492
pfavreau@mit.edu

©2010 MIT Sloan School of Management