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Andrew Lo

Andrew Lo

Charles E. and Susan T. Harris Professor

Department: Professor of Finance

Contact: (617) 253-0920, andrew.lo@mit.edu

Expertise: Analyst forecasts; Angel investing; Applied economics; Applied mathematics; Applied probability; Arbitrage pricing theory; Artificial intelligence; Asset management; Asset pricing; Banking; Banking management; Banking operations and policy; Banking regulation; Bankruptcy; Bayesian networks; Bayesian statistics; Bayesian statistics; Big data; Biopharmaceutical; Biotechnology; Bond markets; Bond negotiations; Bond pricing; Business intelligence; Business plans; Cancer; Capital budgeting; Capital controls; Capital market; CEO compensation; Clinical trials; Consumer behavior; Contagion; Corporate diversification; Corporate finance; Corporate governance; Corporate strategy and policy; Currency; Cyber security; Data acquisition; Data analysis; Data mining; Decision making; Deflation; Derivatives; Disaster recovery; Distance learning; Dividend policy; Dot-com; Drug models; eCommerce; Econometrics; Economic crisis; Economics; Education; Emerging businesses; Entrepreneurial finance; Entrepreneurial management; Equities; Euro; Exchange rates; Executive compensation; Federal Reserve; Financial econometrics; Financial engineering; Financial information technology; Financial information technology; Financial markets; Financial reporting; Financial services; Financial statement analysis; Foreign investment; Futures; Government; Healthcare; Healthcare industry; Hedge funds; Hurdle rates; Inflation; Intellectual property; Intellectual property law; Interest rates; International finance; Internet privacy issues; Intertemporal choice; Investment analysis; Investment banking; Investment risk; Investment strategies; Knowledge sharing; Macroeconomics; Mathematical programming; MBA; Medical decision making; Medicine; Mergers and acquisitions; Mobile banking; MOOCs; Mortgage funds; Mutual funds; Neural networks; New venture development; New ventures; Non-linear dynamics; Online banking; Online education; Online feedback mechanisms; Operations research; Optimal control; Optimization; Options; Patents; Pensions; Personal finance; Pharmaceuticals; Portfolio choice; Portfolio design and management; Private equity; Research and development; Retirement planning; Revenue management; Risk capital; Risk management; Sampling; Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC); Security prices; Simulation; Software agents; Startups / Start-ups; Statistics; Stochastic modeling; Stock exchange; Stock exchange consolidation; Stock market; Stock options; Stock trading; Subprime lending; Trading decisions; Treasuries; Venture capital; Wall Street; Web-based marketing

Deborah Lucas

Deborah Lucas

Sloan Distinguished Professor of Finance

Department: Director of the MIT Golub Center for Finance and Policy

Contact: (617) 715-4816, dlucas@mit.edu

Expertise: Fannie Mae; Federal budget; Federal credit programs; Fiscal policies; Freddie Mac; Governmental financial institutions; Retirement finance; Social Security; Student loans

Robert C Merton

Robert C Merton

School of Management Distinguished Professor of Finance

Contact: (617) 715-4866, rmerton@mit.edu

Expertise: 401K; Arbitrage pricing theory; Asset management; Asset pricing; Contagion; Derivatives; Finance; Financial engineering; Financial institutions; Financial markets; Financial services; Functional finance; Governmental financial institutions; Options; Options pricing valuation; Pension funds; Pensions; Portfolio choice; Portfolio design and management; Portfolio theory; Retirement finance; Retirement planning; Risk management; Risk management

Jonathan Parker

Jonathan Parker

Robert C. Merton (1970) Professor of Finance

Contact: (617) 253-7218, JAPARKER@MIT.EDU

Expertise: Asset pricing; Bitcoin; Central banks; Currency; Equities; Euro; Exchange rates; Federal budget; Finance; Fiscal austerity; Fiscal cliff; Fiscal policies; Global economics; Great Recession; Intertemporal choice; Investment strategies; Macroeconomics; Monetary policy; Personal finance; Portfolio choice; Recession; Retirement finance; Savings rates; Securitization; Security prices; Stimulus

Robert Pozen

Robert Pozen

Department: Senior Lecturer

Contact: (617) 715-4813, bobpozen@mit.edu

Expertise: 401K; Banking regulation; Corporate governance; Corporate governance; Corporate governance; Corporate governance; Corporate taxation; Dodd-Frank Act; Executive compensation; Financial institutions; Financial markets; Financial regulation; Financial reporting; Financial reporting; International tax; Investment policy; Pension funds; Pensions; Retirement finance; Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC); Social Security; Tax policy; Tax policy; Tax reforms

Jeffrey Shames

Jeffrey Shames

Department: Senior Lecturer, Finance

Contact: (617) 253-6033, jshames@mit.edu

Expertise: Sustainability

Henry Weil

Henry Weil

Department: Senior Lecturer, Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management

Contact: (617) 258-6101, hbweil@mit.edu

Expertise: Airlines; Alliances; Asia; Aviation; Banking; Bermuda; Business process modeling; Capital budgeting; China; Competition; Competition; Competitive strategy; Computer industry; Consumer behavior; Convergence; Corporate strategy and policy; Credit card industry; Customer relationships; Customer service; Data acquisition; Digitalization; Dot-com; eCommerce; Electronic media; Emerging businesses; Emerging markets; Energy; Entrepreneurial management; Ethanol; Europe; European Union (EU); Financial services; France; Globalization; Hong Kong; Industrial economics; Information technology; Innovation; International corporate strategy; International management; Internet telephony; Lead users; Management of technology; Marketing strategy; Media; Microeconomics; Mobile computing; New ventures; Nonlinear dynamics; Oil; Online banking; Online media; Pharmaceuticals; Pricing; Research and development; Retirement planning; Singapore; Startups / Start-ups; Strategic management; Strategic planning; System dynamics; Taiwan; Technological innovation; Technological strategy; Technological transfer; Trust-based marketing; Wi-fi; Wireless communication

This single act would help many Americans reach retirement savings goals — Robert Pozen

From MarketWatch It’s true for everyone: despite our best intentions, we often fail to accomplish what we set out to do. When it comes to retirement investing, millions of Americans do not meet their own declared saving goals for retirement. As a result, almost one-third of the U.S. population has no retirement savings at all,while many others will fall well short of what they will need for their Golden Years. A solution can be found in the field of behavioral economics, which suggests ways tohelp Americans start saving. It seems that saving is a lot like dieting — small changes can help you reach your goal. For example, many studies have shown that being automatically placed in a savings plan dramatically boosts participation by employees — even if they can opt out. These studies show that when an automatic savings plan is introduced with an opt-out, 60% to 70% of … Read More » The post This single act would help many Americans reach retirement savings goals — Robert Pozen appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

We Put Financial Advisers to the Test–and They Failed — Antoinette Schoar

From The Wall Street Journal The world we live in asks us to make an abundance of financial decisions every day. These range from the inane, such as whether to risk a parking ticket when you stop for one minute to drop off your dry-cleaning; to the highly complex, such as which funds and investment products to pick for your retirement savings. All of these decisions require risk-return tradeoffs. Unfortunately, while people have many opportunities in life to perfect their strategy concerning parking tickets, the same is not true for the complex and all-important decisions of how to invest retirement savings. By the time you learn whether a retirement strategy was the right choice, it is usually too late to change it. Not surprisingly then, much research shows that a large fraction of the population is poorly prepared to make these financial decisions by themselves. Typically, when faced with complex … Read More » The post We Put Financial Advisers to the Test–and They Failed — Antoinette Schoar appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

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