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Zen Chu

Zen Chu

Department: Senior Lecturer

Contact: (617) 699-4036, zenven@mit.edu

Matthew Marx

Matthew Marx

Mitsui Career Development Professor

Department: Associate Professor of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management

Contact: (617) 253-5539, mmarx@mit.edu

Expertise: Entrepreneurship / New ventures; Patents; Silicon Valley; Software; Technology strategy

Sinead O'Flanagan

Sinead O'Flanagan

Department: Senior Lecturer, Leadership

Contact: (617) 253-5703, sof@mit.edu

Expertise: Action based learning; Business education; Change management; Cross-cultural awareness; Cultural differences; Design of leadership development; Education; Employee motivation; Europe; High technology companies; International management; Ireland; Leadership; Management effectiveness, measuring; Management of engineers and scientists; Managerial communication; Managerial vision; Managing change; Motivation; Optimization; Organizational change; Organizational culture; Organizational learning; Silicon Valley; Socially responsible business; Sustainability

Running business as if the future matters — Barbara Dyer

From The Case Foundation The Long Now Foundation’s Interval Café is a place for conversation about long-term thinking. Nestled in a concrete warehouse at San Francisco’s historic Fort Mason, the Interval was a fitting watering hole for the nearly 2,500 participants in the recent Social Capital Markets (SOCAP) gathering. SOCAP’s annual pilgrimage to Fort Mason brought together innovators, investors, foundations and social entrepreneurs to “build a world we want to leave to future generations.” But drive an hour south from Fort Mason to Silicon Valley and you’ll be reminded that short-termism is deeply embedded in our business culture. This epicenter of tech start-ups is defined by a business development norm of launch, scale and exit. Investors are more likely to ask, “What’s your exit strategy?” than “What’s your long-term vision?” Today’s young business leaders came of age in the era of “short-termism” where companies enter and exit in five to ten year cycles and compete … Read More »The post Running business as if the future matters — Barbara Dyer appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

The roadblock to commercialisation — Thomas Allen and Rory O’Shea

From Financial Times Knowledge and innovation generated at universities can lead to the creation of high-impact spin-off businesses. Whether it is through the licensing of intellectual property, partnerships or other informal arrangements, the tech transfer process can play a critical role in shaping new industries and regional economic development. Research by Eesley and Miller and Eesley and Roberts has demonstrated the role Stanford University has played in shaping the development of Silicon Valley and MIT’s contribution to building a world-class innovation hub in the Kendall Square district of Cambridge, Massachusetts. While those are examples of successful academic-industry-government ecosystems, the technology transfer system at many universities in the US and Europe is in need of a major overhaul. Its focus is historically rooted in revenue generation rather than in helping innovation. Technology transfer offices in many universities can act as bottlenecks rather than partners in knowledge transfer for economic and societal … Read More »The post The roadblock to commercialisation — Thomas Allen and Rory O’Shea appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

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