Search Results

Results for Turnover:

Emilio J Castilla

Emilio J Castilla

NTU Professor of Management

Department: Professor

Contact: (617) 253-0286, ecastilla@mit.edu

Expertise: B-school; Benefits; Benefits; Business school; Career development; Changing work environments; Changing work environments; Changing workforce; Compensation; Compensation; Conflict resolution; Consulting; Corporate incentives; Cultural differences; Customer incentives; Data analytics; Discrimination; Diversity; Education; Employee motivation; Employee termination; Employment relations; Employment relations; Family issues; Future of work; Future of work; Gender issues; Gender issues; Hiring; Incentives; Industrial relations; Industrial relations; Labor market policy; Labor relations; Managing change; Managing diversity; Motivation; Motivation; Organizational behavior; Organizational change; Organizational culture; Organizational design and performance; Organizational studies; Organizations; Predictive analytics; Race relations; Recruitment; Social networks; Social networks; Sociology; Sociology; Statistics; Training; Training programs; Turnover; Unemployment; Work / family issues

Matthew Marx

Matthew Marx

Department: Associate Professor of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management

Contact: (617) 253-5539, mmarx@mit.edu

Expertise: Business plans; Entrepreneurial management; Entrepreneurship; Innovation management; Labor market policy; Silicon Valley; Silicon Valley; Startups / Start-ups; Turnover

John Van Maanen

John Van Maanen

Erwin H. Schell Professor of Management

Department: Professor of Organization Studies

Contact: (617) 253-3610, jvm@mit.edu

Expertise: Career development; Change management; Changing work environments; Changing workforce; Conflict management; Conflict resolution; Cross-cultural awareness; Cultural differences; Cultural differences; Disney theme parks; Distributed leadership; Diversity; Education; Employee motivation; Employment relations; Employment relations; Executive education; Family issues; Flextime; Future of work; Future of work; Gender issues; Globalization; Human rights; Incentives; Labor relations; Leadership; Leadership; Managing change; Managing change; Motivation; Motivation; Organizational behavior; Organizational change; Organizational culture; Organizational psychology; Organizational studies; Organizations; Social networks; Social psychology; Sociology; Sociology; Teams; Training; Training programs; Turnover; Work / family issues; Work environments; Work-life balance; Worker / management relations

Does the amount you sweat predict your job performance? – Tauhid Zaman

From the Wall Street Journal In a recent study, people who sweated when the stakes were low did the best when stakes were high. IN “GATTACA,” THE DYSTOPIAN cult classic set in the “not too distant future,” parents genetically program their children before birth, coding them for desirable strengths and skills. For them, biometric data is destiny: A person’s genetic code, tracked through a massive database, determines their career, which, of course, affects everything. Nearly 20 years after that movie’s release, we are closer than ever to using biometric data as part of the hiring process, specifically to solve one chronic problem: Employers are bad at predicting who will perform under pressure. Each year tens of thousands of new Wall Street hires undergo boot camps that cost up to $6,000 a person, yet finance has a suicide rate 1.5 times the national average and the second- highest voluntary turnover rate (14.2%, after … Read More » The post Does the amount you sweat predict your job performance? – Tauhid Zaman appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

Your Recent Searches

Can't find what
you're looking for?

Contact us.

Twitter

Paul Denning
Director of Media
Relations
617.253.0576
denning@mit.edu

Patricia Favreau
Associate Director of
Media Relations
617.253.3492
pfavreau@mit.edu

©2010 MIT Sloan School of Management