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Emilio J Castilla

Emilio J Castilla

NTU Professor of Management

Department: Associate Professor of Management

Contact: (617) 253-0286, ecastilla@mit.edu

Expertise: B-school; Benefits; Benefits; Business school; Career development; Changing work environments; Changing work environments; Changing workforce; Compensation; Compensation; Conflict resolution; Consulting; Corporate incentives; Cultural differences; Customer incentives; Data analytics; Discrimination; Diversity; Education; Employee motivation; Employee termination; Employment relations; Employment relations; Family issues; Future of work; Future of work; Gender issues; Gender issues; Hiring; Incentives; Industrial relations; Industrial relations; Labor market policy; Labor relations; Managing change; Managing diversity; Motivation; Motivation; Organizational behavior; Organizational change; Organizational culture; Organizational design and performance; Organizational studies; Organizations; Predictive analytics; Race relations; Recruitment; Social networks; Social networks; Sociology; Sociology; Statistics; Training; Training programs; Turnover; Unemployment; Work / family issues

Aleksandra Kacperczyk

Aleksandra Kacperczyk

Fred Kayne (1960) Career Development Professor of Entrepreneurship

Department: Associate Professor of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management

Contact: (617) 253-6618, olenka@mit.edu

Expertise: Career development; Competitive strategy; Corporate diversification; Corporate social responsibility; Corporate strategy and policy; Discrimination; Diversity; Employee termination; Employment relations; Entrepreneurship; Gender issues; Innovation; New venture development; New ventures; Organizations; Product innovation; Social networks; Social responsibility; Startups / Start-ups; Strategic management; Strategy; Turnover; Work-life balance; Worker / management relations

Matthew Marx

Matthew Marx

Mitsui Career Development Professor

Department: Associate Professor of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management

Contact: (617) 253-5539, mmarx@mit.edu

Expertise: Business plans; Entrepreneurial management; Entrepreneurship; Innovation management; Labor market policy; Silicon Valley; Silicon Valley; Startups / Start-ups; Turnover

John Van Maanen

John Van Maanen

Erwin H. Schell Professor of Management

Department: Professor of Organization Studies

Contact: (617) 253-3610, jvm@mit.edu

Expertise: Career development; Change management; Changing work environments; Changing workforce; Conflict management; Conflict resolution; Cross-cultural awareness; Cultural differences; Cultural differences; Disney theme parks; Distributed leadership; Diversity; Education; Employee motivation; Employment relations; Employment relations; Executive education; Family issues; Flextime; Future of work; Future of work; Gender issues; Globalization; Human rights; Incentives; Labor relations; Leadership; Leadership; Managing change; Managing change; Motivation; Motivation; Organizational behavior; Organizational change; Organizational culture; Organizational psychology; Organizational studies; Organizations; Social networks; Social psychology; Sociology; Sociology; Teams; Training; Training programs; Turnover; Work / family issues; Work environments; Work-life balance; Worker / management relations

Behind the hype over Aetna’s minimum wage boost — Barbara Dyer

From Fortune Last week, Aetna, Inc., one of the largest healthcare insurers in America, made news when it announced it would boost its minimum wage base to $16 an hour for its lowest-earning employees. Aetna  AET 0.35%  also pledged to cover more of its employee’s health costs. In a Wall Street Journal interview, CEO Mark Bertolini said the company hopes to reduce its $120 million annual turnover costs and will monitor how this investment plays out. While a firm’s decision to increase pay for lower-wage workers should certainly be applauded, it also begs the question: Why is the decision to pay workers $16 per hour breaking news? My answer: because of the message it sends to investors and shareholders. Business leaders are undoubtedly influenced by their investors and shareholders. Aetna made the business case for investing in their employees by committing to reduced turnover costs. Unfortunately, for some investors, a firm’s employees are viewed … Read More »The post Behind the hype over Aetna’s minimum wage boost — Barbara Dyer appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.

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