Courses for Academic Year 2014Expand all

Courses
Course #

Description: Introduces principles of microeconomic analysis as a framework for making more informed managerial decisions. Includes the analysis of competitive markets with supply and demand, sources of market power, pricing, anti-trust policy, as well as an overview of game theory and its application to competitive strategy. Students use the tools presented to analyze business and public policies. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Intended primarily for non-Sloan School students.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Gonzalo Cisternas
  • Joseph Doyle
  • Erin Johnson
  • Heikki Rantakari
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Description: Introduces principles of microeconomic analysis as a framework for making more informed managerial decisions. Includes the analysis of competitive markets with supply and demand, sources of market power, pricing, anti-trust policy, as well as an overview of game theory and its application to competitive strategy. Students use the tools presented to analyze business and public policies. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Intended primarily for non-Sloan School students.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Heikki Rantakari
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Description: Uses case studies to investigate the macroeconomic environment in which firms operate. First half of subject develops the basic tools of macroeconomic management: monetary, fiscal, and exchange rate policy. Discusses recent emerging market and financial crises, examining their causes, how best to address them, and how to prevent them from recurring in the future. Second half evaluates different strategies of economic development. Topics include growth, the role of debt and foreign aid, and the reliance on natural resources.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Roberto Rigobon
  • Tavneet Suri
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Description: Applies principles of industrial economics most relevant for corporate strategy to analysis of particular industries. Topics include market structure and its determinants; rational strategic behavior in small numbers situations; strategies for price and nonprice competition; dynamic pricing, output, and advertising decisions; entry and entry deterrence; competition with network externalities; investments under uncertainty; R&D and patent licensing; and the growth and evolution of industries.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Robert Pindyck
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Description: Focuses on the policy and economic environment of firms. Subject divided in three parts: study of the closed economy and how monetary and fiscal policy interacts with employment, GNP, inflation, and interest rates; examination of national economic strategies for development and growth, and study of the recent financial and currency crises in emerging markets; study of the problems faced by transition economies and the role of institutions both as the engine of growth, and as the constraints for policy. Restricted to Sloan Fellows in Innovation and Global Leadership.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Roberto Rigobon
  • Tavneet Suri
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Description: Introduces principles of microeconomic analysis as a framework for making more informed managerial decisions. Includes the analysis of competitive markets with supply and demand, sources of market power, pricing, anti-trust policy, as well as an overview of game theory and its application to competitive strategy. Students use the tools presented to analyze business and public policies. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Heikki Rantakari
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Description: Develops an understanding of the economic factors that shape and influence the markets for real property. Includes an analysis of housing as well as commercial real estate, and covers demographic analysis, regional growth, construction cycles, urban land markets and location theory. Exercises and modeling techniques for measuring and predicting property demand, supply, vacancy and prices.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • William Wheaton
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Description: Develops facility with concepts, language, and analytical tools of economics. Primary focus on microeconomics, analysis of markets and strategic interactions among firms. Emphasizes integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions, and in the assessment of the changing global business environment. Restricted to MIT Sloan Fellows in Innovation and Global Leadership.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Thomas Stoker
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Description: Develops and applies principles of game theory relevant to managers' strategic decisions. Topics include how to reason about strategies and opponents; strategic commitment, reputation, and "irrational" actions; brinkmanship and negotiation; auctions; and the design of markets and contests. Applications to a variety of business decisions that arise in different industries, both within and outside the firm.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Alessandro Bonatti
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Description: Structured around choices and constraints regarding sources and uses of energy by households, firms, and governments, introduces managerial, economic, political, social and cultural frameworks for describing and explaining behavior at various levels of aggregation. Includes examples of cost-benefit, organizational and institutional analyses of energy generation, distribution, and consumption. Topics include the role of markets and prices; financial analysis of energy-related investments; institutional path dependence; economic and political determinants of government regulation and the impact of regulation on decisions; and other forms of government action and social norms regarding desired behavior and opportunities for businesses and consumers, including feedback into the political/regulatory system. Examples drawn from a wide range of countries and settings.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Richard Schmalensee
  • Susan Silbey
  • Chris Warshaw
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Description: Provides an in-depth and interdisciplinary look at electric power systems, focusing on regulation as the link among engineering, economic, legal and environmental viewpoints. Explores a range of topics, such as generation mix and dispatch, demand response, optimal network flows, wholesale and retail electricity supply, renewable generation, risk allocation, reliability of service, tariff design, transmission policy, distributed generation, rural electrification, and environmental sustainability issues, all under both traditional and competitive regulatory frameworks. Background in policy, microeconomics, or engineering required.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Jose Ignacio Perez-Arriaga
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Description: Enables students to understand and conduct careful empirical work using regression analysis as used in business fields such as finance, marketing and strategy, as well as in general business planning and forecasting. Emphasizes model formulation, intuition, and critical evaluation of results. Learning is primarily through empirical work done by student groups; delivered through problem sets, short write-ups, presentations and debates.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Joseph Doyle
  • Roberto Rigobon
  • Thomas Stoker
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Description: Theoretical and empirical perspectives on individual and industrial demand for energy, energy supply, energy markets, and public policies affecting energy markets. Discusses aspects of the oil, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear power sectors. Examines energy tax, price regulation, deregulation, energy efficiency and policies for controlling pollution and CO2 emissions. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 60.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Christopher Knittel
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Description: Theoretical and empirical perspectives on individual and industrial demand for energy, energy supply, energy markets, and public policies affecting energy markets. Discusses aspects of the oil, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear power sectors. Examines energy tax, price regulation, deregulation, energy efficiency and policies for controlling pollution and CO2 emissions. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 60.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Christopher Knittel
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Description: Develops facility with concepts, language, and analytical tools of economics. Primary focus is on microeconomics. Emphasizes integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing US and international business environments. Restricted to Executive MBA students.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Ernst Berndt
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Description: Focuses on how managers build and manage complex organizations to achieve strategic goals. Develops theoretical frameworks that build on 15.010 and 15.311. Applies these frameworks to corporate strategy (i.e., the design and management of the multi-business firm) and extended enterprises (i.e., the design and management of multi-firm structures such as supply chains, alliances, joint ventures, and networks).

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Robert Gibbons
  • Bengt Holmstrom
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