Courses and Programs for Academic Year 2014Expand all

Courses
Course #

Description: Examines the evolution from Web 2.0, with its emphasis on interactivity through online collaboration and sharing among users (primarily through social networking sites, wikis and communication tools), to Web 3.0, which focuses on high proactivity, transforming the Web into a database, and the leveraging of artificial intelligence technologies, such as the Semantic Web. Introduces Management 3.0 and the range of new Web technologies, applications, and business opportunities and challenges that it supports. Includes case studies, industry and academic speakers, discussion of basic principles, and a team project.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Stuart Madnick
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Description: Analysis of the underlying economics of information with management implications. Studies effects of digitization and technology on industry, organizational structure, and business strategy. Examines pricing, bundling, and versioning of digital goods, including music, video, software, and communication services. Considers the managerial implications of social networks, search, targeted advertising, personalization, privacy, network externalities, open source, and alliances. Discusses key principles. Includes case studies, industry speakers, and a team project.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Erik Brynjolfsson
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Description: Addresses key sustainability challenges faced by business and society. Explores alternative ways to view organizations that draw attention to cross-boundary interdependencies and help leaders at all levels develop their capacity to collaborate for systemic change. Develops skills to help students surface and reflect on mental models and practices that keep organizations stuck in unproductive system dynamics. Weaves together theory, experiential practices, assignments, guest speakers, and an immersive project experience that focuses on systems change.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Wanda Orlikowski
  • Peter Senge
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Description: Designed to help students understand how top performing firms use information technology (IT) to distinguish themselves from their competitors. Explores how firms manage, use, and invest in IT to execute and define business strategy in a digital economy. Includes case studies about firms using IT to enhance competitiveness, with executives from these firms responding to student observations. Student teams work on consulting projects for companies, such as Bank of America, ExxonMobil, PepsiCo, and State Street.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Jeanne Ross
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Description: Builds upon relevant economic theories and methodologies to analyze the changes in organizations and markets enabled by IT, especially the internet. Typical perspectives examined include industrial organization and competitive behavior, price theory, information economics, intangible asset valuation, consumer behavior, search and choice, auctions and mechanism design, transactions cost economics and incomplete contracts theory, and design of empirical studies. Extensive reading and discussion of research literature aimed at exploring the application of these theories to business issues and challenges raised by the internet and related technologies. Primarily for doctoral students.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Erik Brynjolfsson
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Description: Examines the assumptions, concepts, theories, and methodologies that inform research into the social aspects of information technology. Extensive reading and discussion of research literature aimed at exploring micro, group, and macro level social phenomena surrounding the development, implementation, use and implications of information technology in organizations. Primarily for doctoral students.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Wanda Orlikowski
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Description: Group study of current topics related to management not otherwise included in curriculum.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Peter Gloor
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Programs

Information Technology does frontier research on the economic, business and organizational implications of digital technologies. PhD Program participants are expected to acquire a solid grasp of underlying information technologies and principles of information theory, along with their organizational and economic implications. Students and faculty address research questions raised by the emerging digital economy, the transformation of organizations and markets, and opportunities for new business models.

 

IT is inherently multi-disciplinary. Study in this area utilizes faculty with backgrounds in economics, management science, computer science, organizational behavior and psychology. The MIT Center for Digital Business, the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence and the MIT Center for Information Systems research are among the resources available to students to conduct innovative IT research in a wide variety of areas.

 

Learn more about the PhD program at MIT Sloan.

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