Courses and Programs for Academic Year 2015Expand all

Courses
Course #

Description: Helps students consider the entire marketing mix in light of the strategy of the firm. Reviews customer-based sources of competitive advantage and discusses how to identify, measure, and leverage them. Introduces a method for comparing alternative selling formats (e.g., brick and mortar vs. electronic), aiming to find the most efficient ways to sell different products to different customers. Discusses the myriad ways in which the firm can grow its sources of competitive advantage. Provides practical experience in using tools to identify, evaluate, and develop marketing strategies; design efficient products and selling formats; and plan the use and development of the firms portfolio of resources. Restricted to Executive MBA students.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Birger Wernerfelt
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Description: Focuses on practical pricing tactics. Presents a framework for the steps firms should take when thinking about pricing a new product or improving the pricing performance of an old product. Tools covered include monadic pricing surveys, empirical price elasticity calculations, and conjoint. Restricted to Executive MBA students.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Catherine Tucker
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Description: Studies the application of a reasoned framework to the selection of target markets and the optimization of marketing decisions. Subject is divided into two parts: a tactical portion that reviews how firms optimize profits in their chosen markets, and a strategic portion that focuses on identifying target markets. Tactical topics include pricing, promotion, channel and product issues. Restricted to Executive MBA students.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Catherine Tucker
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Description: Marketing is a rigorous, disciplined science that applies a reasoned framework to the selection of target markets and the optimization of marketing decisions. The subject has two parts: a tactical portion and a strategic portion. The strategic portion focuses on identifying target markets. The tactical portion reviews how firms optimize profits in their chosen markets. Tactical topics include pricing, promotion, channel and product issues. Restricted to MIT Sloan Fellows in Innovation and Global Leadership.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Duncan Simester
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Description: Develops skills in marketing analysis and planning, and introduces key marketing ideas and phenomena, such as how to deliver benefits to customers. Presents a framework for marketing analysis and enhances problem solving and decision-making abilities in these areas. Material relevant to understanding, managing, and integrating marketing concepts in managerial situations, from entrepreneurial ventures to large multinational firms and to consulting.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Amitav Chakravarti
  • John Hauser
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Description: Develops skills in marketing analysis and planning, and introduces key ideas and phenomena, such as how to deliver benefits to customers. Presents a framework for analysis and enhances problem solving and decision-making abilities in these areas. Material relevant to understanding, managing, and integrating marketing concepts in managerial situations, from entrepreneurial ventures to large multinational firms and to consulting. Primarily for undergraduate and non-MBA graduate students.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Amitav Chakravarti
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Description: Framework for understanding pricing strategies and analytics. Topics include economic value analysis, elasticities, customization, complementary products, pricing in platform markets, and anticipating competitive responses.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Catherine Tucker
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Description: Introduction to soft consumer research methods, useful for getting quick customer input into decisions on product design and development, strategic positioning, advertising, and branding. Covers interview techniques, observational methods, voice of the customer, focus groups, and analyses suitable for qualitative data. Introduces new information-gathering methods in development at MIT.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Drazen Prelec
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Description: Project subject teaches students how to create, carry out, interpret, and analyze a market research questionnaire. Emphasis on discovering market structure and segmentation, but students can pursue other project applications. Includes a user-oriented treatment of multivariate analysis (factor analysis, multidimensional scaling, conjoint and cluster analysis).

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Drazen Prelec
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Description: Lays the foundation for the Enterprise Management (EM Lab)Track by developing students' ability to apply integrated management perspectives and practices in their roles within large organizations. Lectures, faculty mentors and cross-functional teams equip students with tools and knowledge to implement this track vision through classroom and project-based activities. Small teams of students deliver quality deliverables working on live integrative projects focused on marketing, operations, and/or Strategy sourced from large organizations, both for-profit and not-for-profit. Management guest speakers from Marketing, Operations and Strategy discuss their interrelated activities. The overall goal is to promote an integrated mindset towards viewing and addressing business issues. Students must register for both the fall term and IAP. Restricted to MBA students in EM Track.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Sharmila Chatterjee
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Description: Applies marketing concepts, analyses and tools used in business-to-business (B2B) marketing which accounts for more than half of the economic activity in the US. Develops an understanding of customer value management as a strategy for delivering superior value to targeted business segments while maintaining equitable returns. Using an analytical framework, students assess components of customer value and translate them into actionable marketing strategies and programs. Focuses on brand building, web and technology facilitation of the supply chain, and customer relationship management. Underscores sales force management within the context of go-to-market strategy. Discusses ethical issues and various B2B contexts such as products and services, for-profits and non-profits, domestic and global markets. Emphasis on applications in technology and healthcare domains. Includes case studies, applied exercises, and readings.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Sharmila Chatterjee
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Description: Uses case studies to introduce economic tools to look systematically at marketing strategy. Topics include how to identify and leverage customer-based competitive advantages and how to use them to develop new ones.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Birger Wernerfelt
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Description: Introduces economic tools to look systematically at entrepreneurial marketing. Topics include how to design products and marketing plans to maximize value for the customer-firm-supplier triad, how to evaluate innovative business models, and when to switch from investing in to monetizing of the customer base. Includes cases, guest speakers, and a project.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Birger Wernerfelt
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Description: Seminar on current marketing literature and current research interests of faculty and students. Topics such as marketing models, consumer behavior, competitive strategy, marketing experimentation, and game theory. Restricted to doctoral students.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Joshua Ackerman
  • John Hauser
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Description: Presentations by faculty, doctoral students, and guest speakers of ongoing research relating to current issues in marketing. Topics: reports of research projects (proposed or in progress) and informal discussions of recent literature dealing with subjects of special interest to participants. Restricted to doctoral students.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Catherine Tucker
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Description: Provides a foundation for building, managing, and defending brands at various stages in the brand life cycle. Introduces the fundamentals of brand architecture and management relevant for B2C and B2B Marketing. Examples from a variety of industries cover topics that include brand co-creation, diffusion, imitation, and authenticity. Explores theory and practice using cases and academic research. Also looks at the development of leadership branding.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Renee Gosline
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Description: Examines models of consumer behavior and methods for its analysis and prediction. Focuses on theories developed in marketing, psychology, and other behavioral sciences, and their role in understanding consumer preferences and decision making. Reviews theories in the context of a variety of industry applications. Students apply theories to their own market research projects.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Joshua Ackerman
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Description: Group study of current topics related to management not otherwise included in curriculum. Coursework may continue into the following term.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • John Little
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Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • John Little
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Description: Group study of current topics related to management not otherwise included in curriculum.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Joshua Ackerman
  • Evan Apfelbaum
  • Renee Gosline
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Programs

MIT Sloan’s MBA program is excited to announce the launch of our latest Track: Enterprise Management. The goal of the Enterprise Management Track is to develop students’ capability to apply integrated management perspectives and practices in their respective roles within large organizations via innovative classroom and project-based activities. Specifically, skills in marketing, operations, and strategy will be developed into a coherent perspective for cutting-edge performance. The curriculum prepares students for career tracks related to large organizations in the for-profit & not-for-profit sectors such as: consulting (different practices), functional and cross functional positions within large organizations (e.g., rotational management programs, marketing, branding, strategy, supply chain and operations management), product development and innovation management.

- See more at: http://mitsloan.mit.edu/mba/program-components/special-tracks-dual-degrees/enterprise-management-track/#sthash.2OFZojfm.dpuf

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