Courses and Programs for Academic Year 2015Expand all

Courses
Course #

Description: Traditional "in-house" innovation processes must be changed to benefit from emerging open-source innovation practices. Users are now increasingly developing their own b-to-b and b-to-c products. Course explains proven open innovation development methods such as crowdsourcing, innovation toolkits, tournaments and more. Includes visits from industry experts who present cases that illustrate the art required to implement each method.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Eric von Hippel
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Description: Advanced subject in the economics of technological change. Covers the micro-foundations of the knowledge production function (including the role of creativity and the impact of Science), the impact of institutions and strategic interaction on the commercialization of new technology, and the diffusion and welfare impact of ideas and technology. Includes a mixture and explicit comparisons of both theoretical and empirical research. Students should have adequate preparation in microeconomic theory and econometrics. Primarily for PhD students.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Pierre Azoulay
  • Scott Stern
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Description: Considers key strategic concepts, especially the distinction between being a product versus a services company, as well as a product versus a platform strategy. Reviews how software became a business (from early developments in services to the emergence of standardized products), and the transition to software as a service, and cloud computing. Studies critical techniques for managing sales and marketing, as well as product development and project management for software products. Examines how the business differs for various platforms - including new and traditional enterprise software, social media, internet video, and mobile competitors - as well as for entrepreneurs competing in these markets. Student teams help teach some weekly sessions and analyze emerging companies and sectors in team projects.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Michael Cusumano
  • Imran Sayeed
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Description: Provides an overview of entrepreneurial theory and practice for founding, developing and growing new enterprises, primarily but not exclusively focused on companies with a technological base. Weekly lectures and dinner discussion sessions by academic and practitioner faculty engaged in the MIT Entrepreneurship Program, supplemented by leaders of related MIT entrepreneurship activities, e.g., Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship, Technology Licensing Office, Deshpande Center, and Venture Mentoring Service, as well as successful entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. Includes student Open Mic presentations and discussion of new business ideas. Enrollment in ES.580, Silicon Valley Study Tour, for the following spring term required. No listeners; restricted to students in Sloan Entrepreneurship and Innovation (E&I) MBA track.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Edward Roberts
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Description: Surveys key strategic decisions faced by managers, investors and scientists at each stage in the value chain of the life science industry. Aims to develop students' ability to understand and effectively assess these strategic challenges. Focuses on the biotech sector, with additional examples from the pharmaceutical and medical device sectors. Includes case studies, analytical models, and detailed quantitative analysis. Intended for students interested in building a life science company or working in the sector as a manager, consultant, analyst, or investor. Provides analytical background to the industry for biological and biomedical scientists, engineers and physicians with an interest in understanding the commercial dynamics of the life sciences or the commercial potential of their research.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Jonathan Fleming
  • Andrey Zarur
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Description: Project-based approach to innovation and venture creation in the energy sector. Explores how innovation and entrepreneurial concepts apply (or do not apply) to the significant opportunities in the industry. Working in teams, students create new ventures specifically for the energy sector. Lectures guide teams through key elements of their projects. Concurrent enrollment in 15.933 recommended.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • William Aulet
  • Thomas (Tod) Hynes
  • Francis O'Sullivan
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Description: Examines strategic and organizational issues for existing firms in developing new technologies and new business areas, from the perspectives of both large corporations and emerging technology-based enterprises. Studies linkages between internal and external sources of technology in major new business development. Examines internal entrepreneurial ventures, alliances (especially between large and new companies), joint ventures, acquisitions, corporate venture capital investments, and licensing as alternative business development approaches. Covers aspects of corporate business development other than mergers and acquisitions. Outside speakers supplement faculty lectures. Student teams prepare term reports on a competitive analysis of some aspect of corporate business development.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Aleksandra Kacperczyk
  • Valentin Livada
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Description: Project-based class in which students use entrepreneurial techniques to build innovation-driven ventures in a time-compressed but robust setting. Applies the fundamental concepts provided in other foundational entrepreneurship courses in greater depth and presents additional tools and techniques. Students apply these concepts to specific venture-development projects. Designed to help students who want to prototype their potential new venture. Includes designing, developing, and testing the underlying product/service for the new venture. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Application required; consult instructor.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • William Aulet
  • James Baum
  • Elaine Chen
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Description: Students work in teams to develop commercialization strategies for innovative research projects generated in MIT laboratories. Projects cover critical aspects of commercialization, from selecting the target application and market for the technology to developing an intellectual property strategy and performing a competitive analysis. Instruction provided in communication and teamwork skills, as well as analysis of the challenges and benefits of technology transfer. Includes lectures, guest speakers, and extensive team coaching. Designed primarily for students in engineering, science, and management. Applications, resumes, and a brief statement of interest are required prior to registration.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Noubar Afeyan
  • Fiona Murray
  • Luis Perez-Breva
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Description: Seminar on founding, financing, and building entrepreneurial ventures in developing nations. Challenges students to craft enduring and economically viable solutions to the problems faced by these countries. Cases illustrate examples of both successful and failed businesses, and the difficulties in deploying and diffusing products and services through entrepreneurial action. Explores a range of established and emerging business models, as well as new business opportunities enabled by emerging technologies in MIT labs and beyond. Students develop a business plan executive summary suitable for submission in the MIT $100K Entrepreneurship Competition $1K Warm-Up.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Joost Bonsen
  • Sandy Pentland
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Description: Seminar surveys internal and external entrepreneurship, based on Media Lab technologies, to increase understanding of how digital innovations grow into societal change. Cases illustrate examples of both successful and failed businesses, as well as difficulties in deploying and diffusing products. Explores a range of business models and opportunities enabled by emerging Media Lab innovations. Students craft a business analysis for one of the featured technology innovations. Past analyses have become the basis for research publications, and new ventures. Particular focus on big data, mobile, and the use of personal data.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Joost Bonsen
  • Sandy Pentland
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Description: Project-based class in which students use entrepreneurial techniques to build innovation-driven ventures in a time-compressed but robust setting. Applies fundamental concepts in greater depth and introduces tools and techniques. Students apply these concepts to specific venture-development projects. Designed to help students who want to prototype their potential new venture. Includes designing, developing, and testing the underlying product/service for the new venture. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Application required; consult instructor.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • William Aulet
  • James Baum
  • Elaine Chen
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Description: Covers the process of identifying and quantifying market opportunities, then conceptualizing, planning, and starting a new, technology-based enterprise. Topics include opportunity assessment, the value proposition, the entrepreneur, legal issues, entrepreneurial ethics, the business plan, the founding team, seeking customers, and raising funds. Students develop detailed business plans for a start-up. Intended for students who want to start their own business, further develop an existing business, be a member of a management team in a new enterprise, or better understand the entrepreneur and the entrepreneurial process. Meets with 15.390 when offered concurrently.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • William Aulet
  • Christian Catalini
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Description: Examines the human side of managing technical professionals and teams throughout innovative processes, including micro and macro issues. Topics include motivational commitment and performance; dealing with complacency; understanding the relationships among innovation, change, motivation, and uncertainty; managing creative individual contributors; effective recognition and reward systems; leading decision making processes; staffing critical roles and cross-functional relationships; information/knowledge transfer; organizational diagnosis for change. Restricted to SDM students; others with permission of instructor.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Ralph Katz
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Description: Provides the skills required for a CEO to deal with complex problems under highly adverse conditions. Cases and guest CEO speakers present real-life, high adversity situations that students then deal with through role play. Emphasis on how to quickly define the issues at stake, determine and evaluate the options, and then take critical and precipitous actions to address the situation. No listeners.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Howard Anderson
  • Peter Kurzina
  • Neil Thompson
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Description: Practical and tactical ins and outs of how to sell technical products to a sophisticated marketplace. How to build and manage a sales force; building compensation systems for a sales force, assigning territories, resolving disputes, and dealing with channel conflicts. Focus on selling to customers, whether through a direct salesforce, a channel salesforce, or building an OEM relationship. Half term course.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Howard Anderson
  • Kirk Arnold
  • Dennis Hoffman
  • Lou Shipley
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Description: Covers the process of identifying and quantifying market opportunities, then conceptualizing, planning, and starting a new, technology-based enterprise. Topics include opportunity assessment, the value proposition, the entrepreneur, legal issues, entrepreneurial ethics, the business plan, the founding team, seeking customers and raising funds. Students develop detailed business plans for a start-up. Intended for students who want to start their own business, further develop an existing business, be a member of a management team in a new enterprise, or better understand the entrepreneur and the entrepreneurial process. Meets with 15.379 when offered concurrently.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Howard Anderson
  • William Aulet
  • Christian Catalini
  • Matthew Marx
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Description: Explores key organizational decisions that have far-reaching consequences for founders and their ventures. Though a series of cases, readings, and simulations, students examine five founder's dilemmas: whether and when to found; whom to include in the founding team; how to allocate equity among co-founders; whether to involve external investors; when and how to exit. Aims to equip students with tools and frameworks to help them understand the implications of early decisions, and to build enduring resources that enable the venture to execute even if the original plan changes substantially.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Matthew Marx
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Description: Examines opportunities and problems for entrepreneurs outside the US, including in Europe, Latin America, and Asia. Covers the linkages between the business environment, the institutional framework, and new venture creation. Students apply analytics of finance for start-ups in emerging markets. In addition to discussing a range of global entrepreneurial situations, student groups pick one particular cluster on which to focus and to understand what further development would entail. Classroom interactions are based primarily on case studies.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Simon Johnson
  • Valerie Karplus
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Description: Focus is on the role of the CEO. Students learn from some of the world's leading CEOs who are invited to speak in the class. Topics include the job of the CEO, corporate strategy, and career learnings and advice. Particular emphasis on how the CEO is reacting to the crossroads where he currently finds his company. Sessions are highly interactive, with questions from the students. Before each class, a small group of students has dinner with the guest CEO, a truly unique experience for the students.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Howard Anderson
  • Peter Kurzina
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Description: Teams of science, engineering, and management students participate actively one day a week on-site with the top management of high tech start-ups in order to gain experience in starting and running a new venture. Student projects focus on one urgent aspect of the start-up, such as selection of target market, design of market-entry strategy, choice of sales approach to initial customers, etc. In addition to the regular MIT registration process, students should register at the course website one month before class to facilitate formation of student teams and matching of teams with potential host companies.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Christian Catalini
  • James Dougherty
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Description: Exposes students to the content, context, and contacts that enable entrepreneurs to design and launch successful stand-alone ventures, ventures inside established corporations, and ventures in partnership with established corporations based on new innovations. Students examine the critical entrepreneurial and innovation challenges facing entrepreneurs inside new and established firms, and develop frameworks that allow them to identify, evaluate, iterate, and integrate their ideas effectively. Case-based discussions complemented by visits to key actors in MIT labs, as well as live case studies with successful entrepreneurs. Specially designed team projects provide practical experience in entrepreneurial strategy, innovation management, and the workings of the MIT entrepreneurial ecosystem. Restricted to Executive MBA students.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • William Aulet
  • Pierre Azoulay
  • Christian Catalini
  • Elaine Chen
  • Christine Kelly
  • Fiona Murray
  • Luis Perez-Breva
  • Katherine Rae
  • Edward Roberts
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Description: Introduces a variety of modern strategy frameworks and methodologies to develop the skills needed to be a successful manager. Cases and readings explore a range of strategic problems, focusing particularly on the sources of competitive advantage and the interaction between industry structure and organizational capabilities. Emphasizes the perspective of the general manager in ensuring the firm's success. Encourages awareness of both the external (market) and internal (organizational) forces that shape firm performance. Restricted to Executive MBA students.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Pierre Azoulay
  • Scott Stern
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Description: Explores a wide range of strategic problems, focusing particularly on the sources of competitive advantage and the interaction between industry structure and organizational capabilities. Introduces a wide variety of modern strategy frameworks and methodologies. Builds upon and integrates material from core topics, such as economics and organizational processes.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Aleksandra Kacperczyk
  • Don Sull
  • Neil Thompson
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Description: Focuses on developing skills and applying frameworks for the conduct of competitive and corporate strategy. Develops tools from earlier core courses, especially those from Strategic Marketing and Organizational Processes, and Economics. Emphasis is placed on the role of strategic commitments, social networks, strategic coherence, and adapting to environmental and technological change. Restricted to MIT Sloan Fellows in Innovation and Global Leadership.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Ezra Zuckerman Sivan
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Description: Builds on 15.900 and 15.902 to explore key concepts that have shaped the field of strategic management and strategy consulting over the past several decades. Uses lectures, readings, case studies, and videos to review the evolution of strategy teaching, research, and practice; the role of randomness in strategic outcomes; the difference between strategic thinking versus planning; and enduring principles related to competitive advantage. Key themes include the role of platform strategies and services, as well as capabilities, pull mechanisms, economies of scope, and flexibility, with examples from a variety of industries. Develops an understanding of what has made some firms successful in the past as well as what managers can do to compete in an uncertain future.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Michael Cusumano
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Description: Provides a series of strategic frameworks for managing high-technology businesses. Emphasis on the development and application of conceptual models which clarify the interactions between competition, patterns of technological and market change, and the structure and development of internal firm capabilities. SDM students only, except with instructor permission.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • James Utterback
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Description: Establishes a solid foundation for students interested in formulating and executing a strategy for a technology-intensive business. Clarifies the interactions among competition, patterns of technological and market change, and the development of internal firm capabilities. Topics include appropriating the returns from innovation, the role of intellectual property, cooperative and open innovation, organization of R&D activities inside the firm, and multi-sided platform strategy. Key conceptual frameworks are linked to applications in a variety of industry and case settings.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Pierre Azoulay
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Description: Provides a strategic management framework for the management of entrepreneurial firms. Develops a set of powerful conceptual frameworks that allow entrepreneurs to evaluate and implement key strategic choices: the selection of novel technological and market opportunities, the organization and funding of early-stage ventures, and the development of a commercialization path. Emphasizes the dynamic nature of entrepreneurship. Highlights the role of strategy in the management of uncertainty, and the role of innovation in periods of industry disruption.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Scott Stern
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Description: Focuses on competitive strategy in technology-driven markets. Students acquire a portfolio of models of the signature dynamics in these markets and use the models in projects with participating companies to analyze technology markets, formulate competitive strategies, and illuminate the challenges of execution. Addresses issues critical for both established incumbents and new market entrants. Restricted to graduate students.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Henry Weil
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Description: Introduces the energy system in terms of sources and uses, market characteristics, and key metrics. Provides frameworks for understanding the structure and dynamics of the sector and the drivers of the energy future. Opportunities resulting from demand growth, supply challenges, environmental constraints, security of supply, technology breakthroughs, and regulation are analyzed from the perspectives of both established players and entrepreneurs. Student teams engage in projects that evaluate a segment of the energy landscape and develop a strategic prospectus for a new business opportunity.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Henry Weil
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Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Joost Bonsen
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Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Philip Budden
  • Fiona Murray
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Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Pierre Azoulay
  • Fiona Murray
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Description: Group study of current topics related to management not otherwise included in curriculum. Coursework may continue into the following term.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Eric von Hippel
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Description: Opportunity for group study by graduate students on current topics related to management not otherwise included in curriculum.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Ezra Zuckerman Sivan
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Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Iqbal Quadir
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Description: Group study of current topics related to management not otherwise included in curriculum. Coursework may continue into the following term.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Brian Halligan
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Description: Group study of current topics related to management not otherwise included in curriculum.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Noubar Afeyan
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Description: Group study of current topics related to management not otherwise included in curriculum.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Pierre Azoulay
  • Charles Kane
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Description: Group study through distance learning on current topics related to management.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Thomas Allen
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Description: Group study of current topics related to management not otherwise included in curriculum.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Jason Jay
  • John Pflueger
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Description: Group study of current topics related to management not otherwise included in curriculum.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Robert Hacker
  • Jason Jay
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Description: Group study of current topics related to management not otherwise included in curriculum.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • William Aulet
  • Matt Beane
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Description: Group study of current topics related to management not otherwise included in curriculum.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • William Aulet
  • Elaine Chen
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Description: How do the antitrust laws actually operate in the United States? How are the laws applied to mergers and acquisitions, cases of alleged price fixing, and anti-competitive behavior more generally? And how is economic and financial analysis used in antitrust settings? I will address these questions through the use of numerous examples. I will also discuss the evolving use of antitrust principles in Europe and other parts of the world.

Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • Robert Pindyck
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Professor(s) who recently taught this course:

  • William Aulet
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Programs

For those with a strong commitment to entrepreneurship, the Entrepreneurship & Innovation (E&I) Track brings like-minded students together very early in the MBA program to meet, integrate and learn about startup business concepts and to experience the unique entrepreneurial ecosystem at MIT.

Concepts that typically take the entire program to cover are condensed into the first and second semesters, maximizing students' ability to get started right away. The payoff for the extra work and the intense track requirements is that you will get a jump-start on building an entrepreneurial career.

The E&I Track focuses on launching and developing emerging technology companies. It leads to a certificate in Entrepreneurship & Innovation, in addition to the MBA degree.

The curriculum emphasizes team practice linked to real-world entrepreneurial projects, balances theoretical and practitioner education, and provides thorough exposure to the many building blocks of an entrepreneurial career. In addition, the track leaves sufficient freedom to select other courses.

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