“To overcome the economic challenges we face, we need a new generation of financial industry leaders, policymakers, and regulators who have a deep understanding of how technology drives the financial system. At MIT Sloan, I'm surrounded by an exceptionally smart group of colleagues committed to training this new generation, and by talented, passionate students eager to make a difference.”

Andrei Kirilenko
MIT Sloan Professor of Practice in Finance

History

An international legacy

MIT Sloan’s international learning ventures began in the 1930s with student camping tours of industrial Europe. Sponsored by the Thorne-Loomis Foundation, the tours were structured around site visits to European manufacturing plants. Travel arrangements were anything but glamorous; students drove from country to country in a converted bus outfitted with sleeping quarters and a makeshift kitchen.

The advent of World War I brought an end to the camping tours, but in the 1950s MIT Sloan resurrected international student travel through its Sloan Fellows Program. The inaugural Sloan Fellows international field trip brought students to Montreal and Ottawa, where they met with managers at several organizations to gain insight into foreign business practices. Later field trips were mainly throughout Europe.

Establishing ties in Russia and China

In the 1950s, MIT Sloan began collaborating with the former Soviet Union’s State Committee for Science and Technology. Using the Sloan Fellows international field trip as a platform, MIT Sloan sent student groups to Moscow to visit businesses and meet with their leadership teams. In exchange, executives from the Soviet Union came to MIT Sloan to take classes as visiting Sloan Fellows.

A similar arrangement was established in China, which laid the groundwork for MIT Sloan’s subsequent engagements throughout China and the Asia-Pacific region. The School’s first formally recognized partnerships in China were established in 1996 with Tsinghua University and Fudan University.

While Asia-Pacific continues to be a key area of international activity for MIT Sloan, the past decade has seen exciting new collaborations in Portugal, Turkey, India, and Brazil. In 2013, MIT Sloan expanded its presence in Latin America by opening the MIT Sloan Latin America Office in Santiago, Chile, the School’s first office outside the United States.  

"MIT Sloan has a needs-blind admissions policy so our goal is to accept the best students in Latin America and around the world without consideration of his or her economic situation. Once a student is admitted then it is our goal to craft a financial package which will meet each students needs through guaranteed loans, private loans, scholarships and opportunities to be teaching or research assistants for MIT professors."

- David Capodilupo, Executive Director, MIT Sloan Office of International Programs