“One of my favorite things about teaching at MIT Sloan is the diversity and high quality of students. They are eager to learn new things, they think independently, and they're willing to tackle difficult issues.”

Antoinette Schoar
Michael Koerner ’49 Professor of Entrepreneurial Finance

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MIT Sloan

When MIT Sloan decided in 2010 to launch an Executive MBA program, it was a game changer for the northeast market. The school’s prestige and brand is among the best in the world so the demand for the new program was immediate: 306 people applied for the first 62 seats in the inaugural class that would launch in October of 2010.


The result: a 25% acceptance rate that rivaled the best full-time MBA programs and was significantly better than the selectivity at number one ranked Wharton whose acceptance rate of 44% had made it the most selective EMBA program in the world before MIT came along. The first few classes into the program have been nothing less than exceptional: one in four in the Class of 2013 already hold a C-level title, while 40% already have earned an advanced degree. Students had on average an unusually high 17 years of work experience, and 54% live and work outside the greater Boston area.

What they have signed up for is a pretty expensive and rigorous 20-month program delivered through 26 Friday-Saturday sessions, four week long on-campus residencies as well as another week abroad to work with your team on a consulting project. Expect to spend between 12 and 20 hours every week on coursework and team projects. All together, the program will throw as much work at students as MIT does in its full-time, one-year Sloan program. The Saturday sessions go until 4 p.m. and students who travel from outside the Boston area are encouraged to arrive on Thursday night before the all-day Friday sessions.

“This is not a dumbed down program,” insists M. Jonathan Lehrich, program director, in the superb webinar that describes the program in detail. “You should expect an intense experience. There is a rumor, a nasty smear among EMBA programs, that E stands for easy. We don’t think like that. If anything, our E stands for experiment because we’re always innovating.”

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Originally published January 19 2012

Author: John A. Byrne