Clubs and Activities

Endless opportunities

From Mixers to Consulting Projects Abroad

The roughly 60 MIT Sloan clubs are an accurate metaphor for the MIT culture, distinguished by an absence of borders, and offering a host of experiential learning opportunities to create, organize, implement, and execute — everything from mixers to consulting projects to trips abroad. Many clubs, including the largest — TechLink with 1,200 members — are campus-wide.

A Pivotal Role In the MIT Sloan Experience

Student-run clubs play a pivotal role in the specialized MIT Sloan experience. Club members organize conferences, such as the Venture Capital Private Equity (VCPE) Conference and the Sports Analytics Conference, two of the largest conferences in the United States managed by students.

Competitions, Speakers, Skill-building

Clubs run competitions, such as the MIT $100K Entrepreneurship Competition. Clubs also bring in seasoned executives to conduct skills sessions and resume reviews, as well as informal lunch talks and broad networking sessions. In addition to professional clubs, there are groups for culture, sports, and other interests. There is even a club for spouses, partners, and significant others at MIT Sloan. New clubs spring up all the time, and you can even start your own. 

Student Senate

A powerful force for positive change and community building, the Student Senate is MIT Sloan's official student government — and a critical link between the student body and the School's program management. Every MIT Sloan student is a potential Senator, and we encourage you to participate even if you're not interested in the responsibility of directly holding office.

 

Technology Clubs

MIT clubs often cater to interest groups around particular areas of technology, such as the Astropreneurs Club, BioPharma Business Club, Energy Club, Mobile Media Club, NeuroTech Club, and the NanoTech and TinyTech Clubs. All these clubs offer speaker programs with venture capitalists, MIT faculty, and entrepreneurs, helping to educate and connect club members to early-stage firms and to new ideas in their fields. These technology clubs also frequently organize major meetings and colloquia.

Club Sports

MIT Sloan boasts one of the largest and most diverse club sports programs anywhere, with one of the highest participation rates. Whether you gravitate to basketball or ballroom dancing, Aikido or ultimate Frisbee, there's a team for you. Because we're just steps from the banks of the Charles River, many students also take advantage of opportunities to sail, canoe, row crew, or run, enjoying some well-earned leisure time.

Through MIT's state-of-the-art Zesiger Sports and Fitness Center (the Z-Center), MIT Sloan students have easy access to an outstanding array of athletic facilities, including cardio machines, free weights, squash courts, floor hockey, basketball, aerobics, volleyball, and an Olympic-size pool.

INDIA LAB: EDUCATIONAL ENHANCEMENT Creating employable workers to boost the economy

“I knew about American business, but not enough about what’s really become a global economy. … You can read about it all you want, but there’s no substitute for being there and seeing the context and seeing how completely different these [other countries] are.”

Ted Chan
MBA
INSTITUTE FOR WORK AND EMPLOYMENT RESEARCH Adapting to the changing nature of work

“We’re very interdisciplinary. Among the faculty in the group are an economist, a political scientist, a sociologist, and an industrial relations specialist. We’ve always made a big effort to be open to a variety of perspectives, but also to go beyond being open to them, to want to bring them in, because it makes for a richer environment.”

Thomas Kochan
Co-director, IWER
$100K 2010 WINNERS: C-CRETE TECHNOLOGIES Reducing the environmental impact of concrete

“One of the reasons I came to Sloan was because I wanted to be at a top MBA institution worldwide. But I also wanted access to working with the latest innovations and the highest technology that was coming out of the MIT labs.”

Natanel Barookhian
MBA
G-LAB: NAM MEE BOOKS, THAILAND Helping a book publisher mature

“It was really rewarding that they wanted to know what we thought. We left there being fairly certain that they will do some of the things that we suggested.”

Lia Cavalcante
MBA
G-LAB: INTERGRUPO, COLOMBIA Growing a business by cultivating relationships

"After we gave our recommendations, the great part was that the very next day the CEO was in the boardroom implementing them with his top vice presidents."

Ramy Hakim
MBA
MSTIR MIT Sloan Teaching Innovations Resources
"MIT is not only a first-class institution in studying entrepreneurship, but in creating it and fostering it. A huge number of companies have emerged from MIT, not just MIT’s science and engineering schools, but also from collaborative projects between the science and engineering and the Sloan school."
John D. Sterman
Jay W. Forrester Professor of Management
RETAIL AND CONSUMER GOODS Luxury beauty and the multicultural consumer
"The goal of the Retail and Consumer Goods Club is to provide networking opportunities for students at MIT Sloan, and to educate students about different functions within the retail and CPG space. We bring in executive-level speakers to educate our community on this topic."
Nga Phan
MBA, co-president of Retail and Consumer Goods Club
MIT LEADERSHIP CENTER Changing views of leadership

“We are very much an action-learning environment. The way to learn leadership is not only through reading cases, not only through learning theory — in fact we don’t want people to regurgitate the theory. We want people to take theory and to live it, use it.”

Deborah Ancona
Faculty Director, MIT Leadership Center
MFIN STUDENT TAKE Collective Brainpower

"The classroom itself is filled with so much collective brain power . . . it's obvious that I'm caught up in a room full of 124 of the brightest, most curious people from around the world."

Tiffany Wetherell
MFin
CENTER FOR INFORMATION SYSTEMS RESEARCH Bringing people and machines together

 “For 35 years, we’ve been studying how companies get value from information. … We try to help organizations take a more holistic view of what they are trying to do.”

Jeanne W. Ross
Director and Principal Research Scientist, CISR
G-LAB: WARMBATHS HOSPITAL, SOUTH AFRICA Improving staffing at a maternity ward

“The assistant to the CEO was like our host mom while we were there. She arranged our housing for us, she took us out to her friend’s game farm, and we got driven around in 4x4s. She was just wonderful to meet, and we developed a personal as well as professional relationship with her.”

Kelsey McCarty
MBA
S-LAB: JAKARTA WATERSHED Combating a clean water crisis

“You could talk about watershed management and conservation of energy all you want. But until you put numbers to it and financial analysis to it, you’re not going to get much done. I came to business school to speak that language, speak with people in terms of numbers, financial numbers so that I can get projects done.”

Ian Lavery
MBA
G-LAB, KUALA LUMPUR Assessing the future of the Smart Card
"You have to manage what you can deliver for the company and what the company is expecting. The bottom line is that the CEOs of those companies want results. Even though we have to work five months in a row with the project, we have to deliver. This experience is more pragmatic than academic. It's a good opportunity to match those two worlds."
Camilo Syllos
MBA
LEADERS FOR GLOBAL OPERATIONS Connecting management and technology
“We are preparing leaders to run the world’s operations companies. And those leaders are at the cutting edge of both management and technology.”
Don Rosenfield
Senior lecturer and director of the Leaders for Global Operations
SLOAN FELLOW Merging disciplines for climate change
"I needed to get a better understanding of the interaction of management and technology. And I think MIT is an obvious place for that. There’s probably no better place in the world [for learning] how technology and management interact."
Pascal Marmier
SF
G-LAB: PRIVATE HEALTH CARE IN AFRICA Defining growth at a for-profit clinic

“At MIT Sloan you have a lot of opportunities to explore entrepreneurship. Especially in a place like Kampala where you have a lot of development, entrepreneurship can be very exciting.”

Anne Reilly
MBA
COURAGE AND STRENGTH Supporting a student with breast cancer
"The Sloan community really rallied around me in a way that I totally didn’t anticipate. … It was just really nice to be a part of a community that I was totally comfortable in and felt completely supported by."
Kyle Maner
MBA
G-LAB: AIDS IN TANZANIA Striving for economic empowerment

“Because of the diversity of our backgrounds, when we hit the ground in Tanzania it almost was a natural play where different people assume different roles.”

Krishna Venugopalan
SF
G-LAB, RAS RESORT, INDIA Marketing in Mumbai
"The project was really interesting because the scope changed a lot. We started focusing in one goal, then we changed to another, then we changed to another, all before we even left Cambridge."
Gerardo Guzman
MBA
INDIA LAB: BANGALORE Working toward market expansion

“These companies are really excited to work with MIT students.They reach out to the community to set up these projects and are great to work with. They give us access to all their resources and are very open to us.”

Katie Baron
MBA
SWITZER FELLOWSHIP WINNER JASON JAY Focusing on environmental research and leadership

 “I love being in a place that is such a nexus of people and ideas — people coming to learn something new and to define themselves. Being a part of that process is a real honor and a real gift.”

Jason Jay
Lecturer, Sustainability, MIT Sloan
SLOAN FELLOW Getting serious about going global
"This year we were so fortunate to have 26 nationalities. So it was amazing exposure. I feel much more well rounded as a global business maker than I was before."
Abner Oliviera
SF
G-LAB: MERCY CORPS, INDONESIA Using business principles to address malnutrition

“The conditions in the neighborhoods we were visiting were different than what we realized before getting there. Beyond that, what was surprising was that there weren’t surprises!”

Libby Putman
MBA

“By training tomorrow’s leaders to manage the risks of the financial system effectively and ethically, we’ll have a fighting chance of surviving even the largest crises.”

- Andrew W. Lo
Charles E. and Susan T. Harris Professor of Finance