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Meet the woman helping to save us from a global chocolate drought — Shayna Harris

The Sustainability Initiative at MIT Sloan fosters a community of innovators for sustainability among students and alumni. Take Shayna Harris, who is the cocoa sustainability manager for Mars Global Chocolate, for instance. Her job—which involves travelling to cocoa farms throughout Indonesia and Africa—helps farmers to increase their yields, which both boosts the global supply of cocoa and lifts people out of poverty. Shayna recently blogged about her job at Bloomberg Businessweek.– Jason Jay, Director, Sustainability Initiative at MIT Sloan From Bloomberg Businessweek A public service announcement to chocolate lovers: The world is facing a severe cocoa shortage by the year 2020. A deficit of this magnitude threatens the future of desserts and tasty snacks everywhere. Imagine a life without M&Ms, Snickers, and Dove Bars. Bleak, right? All kidding and product placement aside (full disclosure: I’ve worked for Mars Global Chocolate since graduating from MIT Sloan School of Management three years ago), this is serious … Read More »The post Meet the woman helping to save us from a global chocolate drought — Shayna Harris appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

The importance of being boring — Simon Johnson

From Business Day The International Monetary Fund is an immensely useful organization, able to deliver substantial amounts of financial and technical assistance at short notice to almost any place in the world. It also has the great advantage of almost always being perceived as incredibly boring. Unfortunately for the IMF, it now needs a slightly higher public profile to convince the US Congress to agree to some important reforms. The Ukrainian crisis may prove helpful, though that appears less likely now – which may be a good thing to the extent that one unintended consequence could be a loan to Ukraine that is larger than it really needs. In the realm of international economics, being perceived as boring confers power to the extent that it allows major decisions to be made without a great deal of external scrutiny. From 1918 to 1939, international economic cooperation was hard to come by … Read More »The post The importance of being boring — Simon Johnson appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

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