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How Wal-Mart can secure the American Dream for millennials — Thomas A. Kochan

From Fortune It’s time all stakeholders — employees, business leaders, government officials, and educators — have a serious discussion about how the nation can create better jobs for the next generation. Wal-Mart has been getting good press recently for its decision to raise its associates’ wages to a minimum of $9 per hour. And it should. So should the unions and community groups that have been pressuring the U.S. retailer to do just that. They also deserve some of the credit for exposing Wal-Mart’s low wages, reliance of associates on food stamps and other public assistance, anti-union tactics, and bottom of the industry ratings on customer service and employee satisfaction. But all those who had a hand in generating this action should see it as only the first step in what will need to be a long and multi-faceted strategy if Wal-Mart and its protagonists, and most of all its associates, are to one … Read More »The post How Wal-Mart can secure the American Dream for millennials — Thomas A. Kochan appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

To Manage a Successful Sports Team, Focus on Data — Ben Shields

From Xconomy The mantra of youth sports where “everyone gets a trophy” is permeating professional leagues. These days every team can claim some semblance of winning. In the bygone era of the NFL, two teams made the playoffs and that consisted of one game, the Super Bowl. Today six teams from each conference advance, and there is talk of adding more. In MLB, it used to be that the league leaders won the pennant and then went to the World Series; now, five teams in each league make the playoffs. In the NBA and the NHL, meanwhile, more than half of all teams make the post-season. As the definition of post-season success broadens and winning becomes a commodity, a team’s performance isn’t enough to stand out in the $750 billion sports industry. And at a time where traditional revenue streams are under pressure and the competition for money, media, and … Read More »The post To Manage a Successful Sports Team, Focus on Data — Ben Shields appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

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