Renee Gosline

Zenon Zannetos (1955) Career Development Professor
Assistant Professor of Marketing

Biography | Selected Publications

Renee Gosline

Renée Richardson Gosline is an Assistant Professor of Marketing in the Management Science group at MIT’s Sloan School of Management. She teaches the MBA course in Branding.

Gosline is generally interested in how social networks affect consumer-brand relationships, and how brands serve as dynamic symbols of social status boundaries. Her current research examines how luxury brands are impacted when they are imitated by counterfeits and “knockoff” imitations. She identifies the circumstances under which imitation can validate, or contaminate, a brand. Gosline’s aim is to contribute to our general understanding of how consumers define authenticity, and how this is shaped by social structure (networks and status, specifically). To this end, she employs a multi-method approach, utilizing both qualitative and experimental methods to uncover consumer insights and develop theory. Gosline’s research interests also include omnivore consumer behavior, social network analysis (particularly how networks constrain consumer choice), and consumer empowerment.

Prior to joining academia, Gosline worked as a Marketing practitioner. She was a Planner and Account Supervisor at Leo Burnett, and a Brand Management Associate at LVMH Moet Hennessey Louis Vuitton. She has developed brand strategies for mass and niche brands.

Renée Gosline holds a BA and MA in sociology and a DBA in Marketing from Harvard University.

 

Contact Information
Office: E62-539
Tel: (617) 452-4303
Fax: (617) 258-7597
Support Staff
Name: Christina Sherman
Tel: (617) 324-4095
Group(s)

General Expertise
Advertising; Advertising; Brand management; Branding; Caribbean; Competition; Consumer behavior; Consumer marketing; Consumer packaged goods; Consumer products, marketing; Intellectual property; Luxury; Luxury; Market research; Marketing; Marketing communication; Marketing strategy; Positioning; Product loyalty; Signaling; Trust-based marketing