MIT Sloan Fellows Blog

MIT Sloan Fellows, alumni, and faculty put themselves in situations around the world where they believe they can have the most impact—and dig in to uncover truth in uncertainty, reason in chaos, and tackle the tough challenges from refreshingly new vantages.

Entrepreneurship: Anatomy of a Dream Team

Posted by MIT Sloan Fellows on February 9, 2017

Surround yourself with like-minded people. Bring in as many different perspectives as you can. Fuel creativity by promoting tensions. It seems that every expert who weighs in on the composition of the perfect management team offers up a different recipe. We polled a number of entrepreneurial gurus and asked them to tell us who should be at your right hand when you’re about to launch a new enterprise. A diverse mix, says Greentown Labs CEO Emily Reichert, PhD, SF ’12.…
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Stress—a Good or Bad Sign in an Employee?

Posted by MIT Sloan Fellows on February 1, 2017

Will the calm, cool, and collected applicant turn out to be a better employee than the person who exhibits stress? Traditionally, companies have tended to think so. In fact, many industries conduct stress tests with current and prospective employees to see how they perform under pressure. Those who remain calm during the simulations are commonly seen as the best fit for stressful on-the-job situations. MIT Sloan professors Juan Pablo Vielma and Tauhid Zaman and graduate student Carter Mundell beg to differ…
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A robot can drive you to work, but can it advise you on your finances?

Posted by MIT Sloan Fellows on January 19, 2017

The founding father of artificial intelligence Marvin Minsky once said that his ultimate goal was not so much to build a computer he could be proud of as to build one that would be proud of him. MIT Sloan Professor Andrew Lo mentioned this anecdote in a recent piece about financial advisers in The Wall Street Journal. In essence, he poses the question: Can a robot do the job? Lo says that while tech-savvy millennials would be just as happy…
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Augmented Reality Summit at MIT Media Lab brings the world’s AR pioneers together on the AR frontier

Posted by MIT Sloan Fellows on January 8, 2017

Augmented reality (AR)—a cousin to virtual technology—is quickly making itself indispensable in fields like medicine, architecture, industrial design, and entertainment, especially gaming. For those interested in leveraging the possibilities of AR, MIT’s annual Augmented Reality Summit is the center of the known universe. AR in Action takes place at the MIT Media Lab January 17 and 18, 2017. The summit convenes the top minds in the augmented reality ecosystem, a diverse group of renowned thought leaders, visionaries, Fortune 100 executives,…
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MIT Sloan’s Jay Forrester, change-maker and inventor of system dynamics, dies at 98

Posted by MIT Sloan Fellows on December 16, 2016

“From the air traffic control system to 3-D printers, from the software that companies use to manage their supply chains to the simulations nations use to understand climate change, the world in which we live today was made possible by Jay’s work.” MIT Sloan Professor John Sterman is talking about legendary system dynamics pioneer Jay Forrester, who died November 16 at the age of 98. [Read the full tribute in MIT News.] A mid-century invention, system dynamics (SD) is the…
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Thomas Kochan offers a new way of working in Shaping the Future of Work

Posted by MIT Sloan Fellows on November 28, 2016

The working models that made sense for post-World War II employees do not necessarily work for the employees of today, and MIT Sloan Professor Thomas A. Kochan believes it’s about time those models were updated to fit a dramatically altered world. In his latest book, Shaping the Future of Work, Kochan outlines the steps that business, government, and academic leaders must take so that workers can perform their best work and prosper. These steps, he contends, are necessary for companies…
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Opinions expressed in this blog are that of individuals and do not reflect the general opinion of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and MIT Sloan.