MIT Sloan Sustainability Initiative

MIT Climate Pathways Project

Advancing evidence-based climate change solutions through interactive simulations and research insights.

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MIT Climate Pathways Project

The Problem

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The menu of possible climate solutions can feel overwhelming.

The urgency to act on climate is real, but leaders face an astounding number of potential options. In order to avoid irreversible harm to our prosperity, society, and health, the world must meet the goals of the Paris Agreement and limit global warming to no more than 1.5-2.0°C from pre-industrial times. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says this requires greenhouse gas emissions be nearly cut in half by 2030 from 2010 levels and reach "net zero" by midcentury.

But which policy pathways can lead to success?

MIT Climate Pathways Project

Why Simulation?

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Because research shows that showing people research doesn't work...

One-way communication, where leaders are inundated with facts from an expert, won’t necessarily change behaviors, and traditional slideshow presentations take a linear approach to conveying information in a world that is anything but straightforward. In contrast, interactive simulation gives leaders the opportunity to learn for themselves about complex systems in a hands-on way.

...and there’s a reason pilots fly in simulators first. 

Pilots log long hours in a safe environment before they take to the skies with precious cargo. In that same vein,  the MIT Climate Pathways Project helps leaders is government, business, and civil society simulate climate policy before taking it to the boardroom or bill signing.

It’s a chance to try things out in a simulated world before making the big decisions that impact us all.

The power of simulation

MIT Climate Pathways Project

The Simulators

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The best available science, in a fraction of a second.

Co-developed between Climate Interactive and the MIT Sloan Sustainability Initiative, these two global climate solution simulators use the best available science. Both are free, fast, easy-to-use, and available in multiple languages. They are tested against and calibrated to historic data and other models, and their structure, equations and assumptions are all published for you to explore. You can even challenge and change the key assumptions. Both simulators are updated regularly with the latest science and new features.

The Simulators:

En-ROADS

En-ROADS is the newest and most popular global simulator that allows users to explore the impact of dozens of policies—such as electrifying transport, pricing carbon, and improving agricultural practices—on hundreds of factors, like energy prices, temperature, air quality, and sea level rise.

Learn more about En-ROADS

 

C-ROADS

C-ROADS allows users to explore the impacts of emissions pathways, deforestation, and afforestation pledges across regional group to determine whether, collectively, they are enough to meet global climate goals.

Learn more about C-ROADS

MIT Climate Pathways Project

How to Engage

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Bring our interactive workshops and simulations to your organization.

Whether you're looking for a one-on-one policy deep dive or an exciting keynote presentation at your conference, explore how you can engage with us below.

MIT Climate Pathways Project

Our Impact

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8 5 0 8

Leaders across government, business, NGOs, and academia have participated in our interactive simulations as of January 2024.

Including:

  • 1761

    Leaders in government.

  • 5674

    Business leaders including C-suite executives

  • 1073

    Leaders in NGOs and academia.

More knowledge, urgency, efficacy, and action.

Lead researchers at the UMass Lowell Climate Change Initiative, Climate Interactive, the MIT Sloan Sustainability Initiative, and Reutlingen University have found that our interactive simulations lead to increased knowledge of climate change science, an enhanced sense of urgency about the issue, a desire to learn and do more about it, and direct action attributed to experience. 

Research On Our Impact

Stories of Our Impact

Explore our news + media.

MIT Climate Pathways Project

Endorsements

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50+ endorsements from leaders in government, business, and civil society.

Leaders in Government

John Kerry

John Kerry

U.S. Special Presidential Envoy for Climate, Former US Secretary of State

John Holdren

John Holdren

White House Science Advisor, 2009-2017

Jay Inslee

Jay Inslee

Washington State Governor, Formal presidential candidate

Rep John Curtis

Rep John Curtis

U.S. House of Representatives, Republican, Utah: 3rd District

Senator Sheldon Whitehouse

Senator Sheldon Whitehouse

U.S. Senator, Rhode Island

Rep. Ann McLane Kuster

Rep. Ann McLane Kuster

U.S. House of Representatives, New Hampshire: 2nd District

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Leaders in Business + Investment

Roberta Barbieri

Roberta Barbieri

Vice President, Global Water and Environmental Solutions, PepsiCo

Tom Steinbach

Tom Steinbach

Executive Director, Tempest Advisors, United States

Jim Hagemann Snabe

Jim Hagemann Snabe

Chairman of Supervisory Boards, Maersk and Siemens | Former CEO, SAP

Andrew Greenspan

Andrew Greenspan

Head of Operations and Risk, Corporate Sustainability, HSBC

Erin Baudo Felter

Erin Baudo Felter

Vice President, Social Impact and Sustainability, Okta

Dr. Mathias Kammüller

Dr. Mathias Kammüller

Managing Partner and CDO, TRUMPF SE + Co KG

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Leaders in Academia + NGOs

Kathleen Simpson

Kathleen Simpson

Chief Executive Officer at The Russell Family Foundation

Itzel Morales

Itzel Morales

Climate Leader Engagement Director / Climate Reality Mexico & LATAM

Alba Peña

Alba Peña

Citizens' Climate Lobby Mexico, Co-lead

Gernot Wagner

Gernot Wagner

Climate Economist and Author, Columbia Business School

Ratna Lindawati Lubis

Ratna Lindawati Lubis

Faculty of Economics and Business, Telkom University, Indonesia

Pablo Lucángeli

Pablo Lucángeli

Climate Change Specialist, Speaker and Professor, Argentina

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MIT Climate Pathways Project

Our Team

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MIT Climate Pathways Project Leadership

John D. Sterman

John D. Sterman

Management Science

Jay W. Forrester Professor of Management

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Bethany Patten

Bethany Patten

Senior Lecturer, Director, Policy and Engagement, EMBA '13

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Krystal Noiseux

Krystal Noiseux

Associate Director, Climate Pathways Project

Andrew Jones

Andrew Jones

Executive Director, Climate Interactive, MS '97

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Michael Sonnenfeldt

Michael Sonnenfeldt

Founder, Chairman, MUUS & Company, Tiger21, SB ’77, SM ’78

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Benjamin Wolkon

Benjamin Wolkon

Founding Partner, MUUS Climate Partners

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Researchers and Affiliates

Jason Jay

Jason Jay

Behavioral and Policy Sciences

Senior Lecturer, Sustainability

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Florian Kapmeier

Florian Kapmeier

Professor of Strategy at ESB Business School

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Ellie Johnston

Ellie Johnston

Engagement Director, Climate Interactive

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Clara Iglesias

Clara Iglesias

Project Manager, Climate Interactive

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Ava De Leon

Ava De Leon

Science & Technology Communications Coordinator, Climate Interactive

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Juliette Rooney-Varga

Juliette Rooney-Varga

Professor, Director, UMass Lowell Climate Change Initiative

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Ken Rath

Ken Rath

Director, Rath Educational Evaluation and Research

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Jessica Wei

Jessica Wei

Undergraduate Research Assistant

MIT Climate Pathways Project

Bring our interactive workshops and simulations to your organization.

Reach out and learn how we can help you advance evidence-based climate policies.

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