MIT Sloan Fellows Blog

MIT Sloan Fellows, alumni, and faculty put themselves in situations around the world where they believe they can have the most impact—and dig in to uncover truth in uncertainty, reason in chaos, and tackle the tough challenges from refreshingly new vantages.

Money For Nothing: The First Great Stock Market Boom, Fraud, and Crash

Posted by Belen Zuniga on October 28, 2020

It was called the South Sea Bubble, and it was one of the most precarious financial crises in history. It was also the birth of modern finance. MIT Professor Thomas Levenson unfurls this sweeping tale of one of the greatest financial frauds in history in his new book Money for Nothing: The Scientists, Fraudsters, and Corrupt Politicians Who Reinvented Money, Panicked a Nation, and Made the World Rich. The book explores the connection between the revolutionary advances in science, unveiled…
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New Mobile Tool Comes to the Rescue of Small Farmers Around the World

Posted by MIT Sloan Fellows on September 24, 2020

Venkat Maroju, SF ’07, believes that the only way to improve one part of an agricultural supply chain is to improve every part. With his radical mobile invention SourceTrace, he is proving out that theory. With software tools to help manage the growth and sale of crops as well as to purchase and track goods, SourceTrace has transformed agricultural supply chains across Africa and around the world. As a politician in Telangana, the region in southern India where he was…
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Leadership Lessons In A Time Of Global Turbulence

Posted by MIT Sloan Fellows on August 11, 2020

This is a year when just stopping our heads from spinning for a day is an achievement to be celebrated. In the leadership realm, however, the weary have been afforded little rest. Yet, this is what leaders train for and how they define their careers. This is an opportunity to think about the management of organizations deeply, scientifically, humanely, holistically—and to find our way through an unprecedented set of crises that are testing our systems and challenging us to accomplish…
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Acknowledge Uncertainty And Learn As You Go

Posted by MIT Sloan Fellows on August 11, 2020

“The foundation of successful leadership during turbulent times is trust—gaining it and granting it,” says Antoinette Schoar, the Stewart C. Myers-Horn Family Professor of Finance and Entrepreneurship at MIT Sloan. It sounds simple, but Schoar points out that this essential building block was not universally set in place by global leaders during the COVID-19 pandemic. “This crisis has introduced unprecedented levels of uncertainty into our lives, and we must be able to trust our leaders in order to find our…
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Not Making Choices Is Choosing

Posted by MIT Sloan Fellows on August 11, 2020

“The operations of most enterprises and organizations during normal times are designed to address many sources of uncertainty,” says Retsef Levi, the J. Spencer Standish (1945) Professor of Management at MIT Sloan and codirector of the Leaders for Global Operations (LGO) program. “Airlines, for example, have plans to address weather uncertainty, and hospitals are prepared to handle variable loads on their emergency departments.” Levi explains that operating schemes of enterprises across many industries and sectors such as retail, healthcare, transportation,…
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Two Inflection Points, One Strategic Vision

Posted by MIT Sloan Fellows on August 11, 2020

  Pittsburgh Regional Alliance (PRA) President Mark Anthony Thomas, SF ’14, was recruited as a disruptor. “I’ve always been a nontraditional person in my roles,” says Thomas, “and leading the PRA is no exception. My appointment in 2019 came with a clear understanding that I would not be taking a business-as-usual approach.” As PRA president, Thomas is responsible for creating, developing, and executing the area’s economic development strategy to drive job creation and business investment. He spent his first four…
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Opinions expressed in this blog are that of individuals and do not reflect the general opinion of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and MIT Sloan.