Teaching Resources Library

Change Management

Operations Management

Conserving Blood During Cardiac Surgery at Huntington University Hospital (A)

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ABSTRACT

Dr. Frank Young, who joined Huntington University Hospital’s Center for Cardiac Medicine in 2011, was confounded when he discovered that the percentage of patients who received blood transfusions was significantly higher than the national average. It was no secret that patients who received blood transfusions after heart surgery had a 30% chance of survival after six months and 50% at 10 years. Furthemore, there were operational costs associated with the heavy use of blood products. In late 2013, Young set out to reduce the percentage of blood transfusions during cardiac surgery by two-thirds within one year. He was certain about his goal, but less certain on what he had to do to achieve it.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE

To understand the multifaceted nature of organizational change processes; shed light on how resistance to change can be managed and overcome in a context with highly-skilled, semi-autonomous professionals; and, highlight the Three Lens Framework on organizational processes.

COULD BE TAUGHT IN THE FOLLOWING COURSE(S)

organizational processes; organizational behavior; operations management; change management; leadership

CONSERVING BLOOD DURING CARDIAC SURGERY AT HUNTINGTON UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL (A)

 

Educator Copy*

*An educator (non-watermarked) copy of this case is available only to individuals who hold teaching positions at academic institutions and want to use the case in a course.

 

SUPPLEMENT MATERIALS UPON REQUEST

(for approved educators only)

Conserving Blood During Cardiac Surgery at Huntington University Hospital (B)