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Meet MIT Sloan’s 4 new faculty members

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From medieval politics to game theory with chimpanzees, here are this year’s four new MIT Sloan faculty members.

Charles Angelucci, Assistant Professor of Applied Economics

Comes from: Angelucci most recently worked as an assistant professor in the economics division at Columbia Business School. He has a PhD in economics from the Toulouse School of Economics.

Research: Angelucci’s research focuses on organizational economics, political economy, and industrial-organizational psychology. His working papers range from the political power of English merchant towns during the late medieval period to how the advent of television disrupted newspapers.

Find out more: On his Twitter page or his website.

Rahul Bhui, Assistant Professor of Management Science

Comes from: Bhui joins the MIT Sloan community by way of the California Institute of Technology, where he earned a PhD in computation and neural systems. He was most recently a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University.

Research: Common threads in Bhui’s publications are time and choice. He is the author of studies on the optimal timing of value-linked decision-making, uncertainty-driven exploration in real-world consumer choice, and how choice rates in competitive chimpanzee games match equilibrium game theory predictions.

Find out more: On his Google Scholar page or his Twitter page.

Taha Choukhmane, Assistant Professor of Finance

Comes from: Prior to joining MIT Sloan, Choukhmane was a postdoctoral fellow in the Economics of an Aging Workforce program at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has a PhD in economics from Yale University.

Research: Choukhmane’s research focuses on household finance, behavioral economics, and public economics. He has a working paper on China’s one-child policy and whether it’s contributed to the rise of the country’s household saving rate, and another on altruism and entrepreneurial risk-taking.

Find out more: On his website.

Chloe Xie, Assistant Professor of Accounting

Comes from: Xie was a consultant at Deloitte Consulting from 2012 – 2015. She has a PhD in accounting from Stanford University.

Research: Xie’s research is on incentives shaped by capital market imperfections. For example, crime and arbitrage. She focuses on how these incentives shape disclosure decisions, investor decision-making, and non-financial market outcomes. Her ongoing research includes accounting firms and market power and a working paper on strategic disclosure and investor loss aversion.

Find out more: On her website.

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