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Understanding the implications of consumer empowerment in health care — Renée Richardson Gosline

From Huffington Post The days of the passive patient and omnipotent Marcus Welby-like physician are long gone. Since the 1990s, consumer empowerment in health care has been increasing, most notably with the advent of direct-to-consumer advertising for prescription medicines. Then, the rise of digital media allowed consumers to search symptoms and create communities around common disease experiences. More recently, the ability to shop for health insurance through health care exchanges and obtain treatment at drug store clinics has led to a new age of consumer empowerment. We’ve gone from a B-to-B model to a B-to-C model in health care. This shift in power to consumers has many implications when it comes to how we make decisions about our health care. Here are six ways that a behavioral lens can help us understand the implications of empowering consumers in health care: 1. Heuristics Heuristics are very important. These mental shortcuts or “rules of thumb” … Read More »The post Understanding the implications of consumer empowerment in health care — Renée Richardson Gosline appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

3 steps for harnessing failure the right way — Anjali Sastry and Kara Penn

From Fast Company Think back to your last project. Was it set up to maximize learning? Did you uncover valuable insights along the way? Did you deliver what you set out to? And once it was over, did your team reflect, or did you move straight to the next thing? A systematic method for managing your projects can set up your team for useful epiphanies at every step. In the end, it can help you to create better deliverables with more lasting and further-reaching impact. For many projects that aim to innovate, the goal is to learn by doing, but too often the doing doesn’t lead to learning. In the rush to get things done and meet deadlines, workplace project teams take action without effective planning and assessment, and the potential value of taking action is lost. The Fail Better method harnesses the power of iteration by linking three sets … Read More »The post 3 steps for harnessing failure the right way — Anjali Sastry and Kara Penn appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

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