Faculty Expertise Guide

When you want information on timely business topics, MIT Sloan School of Management can provide the expertise you need.

Our internationally renowned faculty and research staff explore the world's most critical business problems and share their insightful solutions through dynamic classroom discussions. This guide provides a window on the intellectual vibrancy of MIT Sloan.

The great volume of research conducted at MIT Sloan and the interests of our faculty and researchers continually evolve, so please contact Paul Denning, director of Media Relations, if you don't find what you need.

Passion and vision in business are overrated – Charles Kiefer

From Forbes If you are like a lot of people, your New Year’s Resolution list includes one or more ventures that you’ve been stalling on. Likely you’ve postponed working on this item due to some lack of clarity or perhaps you fear that you haven’t the proper passion for the topic or sector or a compelling vision to start a business. Indeed, how many times have you heard this advice given to people thinking of starting a company: “You’ve got to be passionate about it. You gotta love what you do.” But guess what? Passion isn’t a requirement. Despite what is suggested in the popular press, the founders of many, perhaps most, successful firms didn’t have passion at the beginning, and you don’t have to have it either. Vision isn’t a requirement either, at least not much of one. Here’s another popular myth that needs busting. The advice “you need … Read More »The post Passion and vision in business are overrated – Charles Kiefer appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

Let 2016 be the year we agree tipping is terrible for both workers and customers — Oz Shy

From Quartz What’s an acceptable percentage to tip? The amount has been accelerating without any clear economic force driving it, and with unclear benefits for all parties involved. In the 19th century and during the first half of the 20th century, a 10% tip was common. By the 1980s, 15% tips had become the standard. Now we observe 18%, 20%, and even 25% tipping rates. Perhaps as a result, tipping is a constant source of tension and debate, and a favorite topic for social and economic critique. And, like any controversial subject, it has its own little-understood rules and oddities. Here’s one that stands out: Employees who qualify for tips are not paid the current mandated federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour. Instead they are paid a minimum wage of only $2.13 per hour—presumably because their tips make up for their lower wages. If the tips do not make up the … Read More »The post Let 2016 be the year we agree tipping is terrible for both workers and customers — Oz Shy appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

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