Faculty Expertise Guide

When you want information on timely business topics, MIT Sloan School of Management can provide the expertise you need.

Our internationally renowned faculty and research staff explore the world's most critical business problems and share their insightful solutions through dynamic classroom discussions. This guide provides a window on the intellectual vibrancy of MIT Sloan.

The great volume of research conducted at MIT Sloan and the interests of our faculty and researchers continually evolve, so please contact Paul Denning, director of Media Relations, if you don't find what you need.

The US can’t beat China’s robots but it can win by building the machines that make them – Matt Beane

From Quartz As a US presidential candidate, Donald Trump made keeping manufacturing jobs in the country a key economic issue. He promised to bring back jobs from China, Mexico, Japan, and elsewhere; he pledged to force companies from Ford to Apple to Nabisco to open or re-open factories on American shores; and he vowed to revive the coal and steelmaking industries. His promise to create industrial jobs was key to his electoral victory. Still, many were—and remain—deeply skeptical of Trump’s plans. Mark Cuban, internet entrepreneur and frequent thorn in the side of the president, says that bringing back manufacturing will backfire and lead to overall job losses. Instead, he says, the US ought to invest in robotics to compete with China. “We have to win the robotics race,” he says. “We are not even close right now.” (For what it’s worth, Trump’s labor secretary Steven Mnuchin recently disagreed, saying robots … Read More » The post The US can’t beat China’s robots but it can win by building the machines that make them – Matt Beane appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

What your credit-card offers say about you–Antoinette Schoar

From The Wall Street Journal  Do the credit-card offers you receive in the mail have photos of enticing holiday destinations and reward miles? If so, you should be flattered, since this means that credit- card issuers believe you to be highly educated and financially sophisticated. But if you are receiving card offers with low teaser rates for introductory APR, you might take offense, since card issuers most likely do not view you as savvy. As more and more personal data becomes available, businesses are now able to target customers in a personalized and sophisticated way.  On the bright side, that means you can get products and services that are tailored to your needs. As a result, you are much less likely to get catalogs featuring dresses your grandmother might wear. But, according to our research, the downside is that companies can also more effectively target your behavioral weaknesses, self-control issues or … Read More » The post What your credit-card offers say about you–Antoinette Schoar appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

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