Faculty Expertise Guide

When you want information on timely business topics, MIT Sloan School of Management can provide the expertise you need.

Our internationally renowned faculty and research staff explore the world's most critical business problems and share their insightful solutions through dynamic classroom discussions. This guide provides a window on the intellectual vibrancy of MIT Sloan.

The great volume of research conducted at MIT Sloan and the interests of our faculty and researchers continually evolve, so please contact Paul Denning, director of Media Relations, if you don't find what you need.

Finding new actionable insights in old data research – Hazhir Rahmandad

From Information Management There is a common problem often associated with managing data across scientific disciplines. As the stock of information rapidly grows through scientific discoveries, a major data management challenge emerges as data professionals try to tap prior research findings. Current methods to aggregate quantitative findings (meta-analysis) have limitations. They assume that prior studies share similar designs and substantive factors. They rarely do. Take for example studies estimating basal metabolic rate – the measure of human energy expenditure. Study results can have important implications for understanding human metabolism and developing obesity and malnutrition interventions. Over 47 studies have estimated BMR. But these calculations are based on different body measures, such as fat mass, weight, age, and height – to name a few. How do we combine those studies into a single equation to get usable insights? To address this issue, my colleagues and I designed a new method for … Read More » The post Finding new actionable insights in old data research – Hazhir Rahmandad appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

Why home care costs too much – Paul Osterman

From the Wall Street Journal As baby boomers age into long-term care facilities, Medicaid costs will go through the roof. Americans already spend – counting both public and private money – more than $310 billion a year on long-term support services, excluding medical care, for the elderly and the disabled. Medicaid accounts for about 50% of that, according to a 2015 report from the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured. Other public programs cover an additional 20%. Yet in another decade or so these figures may look small. In 2015 around 14 million Americans needed long-term care. That number is expected to hit 22 million by 2030. There’s an urgent need to find ways of providing good long-term care at a lower cost. One fix would be to deregulate important aspects of home care. There are two million home health aides in the U.S. They spend more time with … Read More » The post Why home care costs too much – Paul Osterman appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

Can't find what
you're looking for?

Contact us.

Twitter

Paul Denning
Director of Media
Relations
617.253.0576
denning@mit.edu

Patricia Favreau
Associate Director of
Media Relations
617.253.3492
pfavreau@mit.edu

©2010 MIT Sloan School of Management