Faculty Expertise Guide

When you want information on timely business topics, MIT Sloan School of Management can provide the expertise you need.

Our internationally renowned faculty and research staff explore the world's most critical business problems and share their insightful solutions through dynamic classroom discussions. This guide provides a window on the intellectual vibrancy of MIT Sloan.

The great volume of research conducted at MIT Sloan and the interests of our faculty and researchers continually evolve, so please contact Paul Denning, director of Media Relations, if you don't find what you need.

The good jobs strategy – Zeynep Ton

From Acast.  If you like this the easiest way to get it is to subscribe on Apple podcasts – give us a rating while you’re there. Zeynep Ton is a Professor of Operations Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management. She studies the retail sector and the way that some firms have invested in paying more and doing more for their workers. She studied firms like QuikTrip, Trader Joes, Mercador in Spain – she found that firms that treat their workers better achieve better results. Quik Trips profit is double the retail average – all of her firms are more profitable and show consistent growth. And this is work that needs doing in 2012 The Independent reported that only 1 in 7 British supermarket workers earned a living wage. We’ll talk about how they make their jobs happier but the key parts are they make some key decisions upfront (1) … Read More » The post The good jobs strategy – Zeynep Ton appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

The hidden culprit behind stagnant wages – Nathan Wilmers

From The Hill Slow wage growth since the Great Recession has been puzzling. As the economic recovery has clocked eight years of growth, unemployment has dropped, but real median wages have barely increased. Commentators have looked for explanations in everything from the rise of artificial intelligence to the scarring effects of the decade-old economic crisis. However, slow U.S. wage growth has a longer history. Relative to the rapid growth marking the post-World War II period, median real wages have grown little since the 1970s (except for the economic boom of the late 1990s). A growing body of research points to the decline in worker bargaining power as a core explanation. The long membership decline of labor unions has made it harder for workers to demand higher pay. In some local labor markets, increased market concentration has left few employers able to dictate terms to workers. The real federal minimum wage … Read More » The post The hidden culprit behind stagnant wages – Nathan Wilmers appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

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