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How millions of people can help solve climate change — Thomas W. Malone, Robert Laubacher and Laur Fisher

From PBS NOVA Next If there ever was a problem that’s hard to solve, it’s climate change. It’s a complex challenge requiring more expertise than any one person can possess—in-depth knowledge of the physics of the upper atmosphere, a firm grasp on the economics of technological innovation, and a thorough understanding of the psychology of human behavior change. What’s more, top-down approaches that have been tried for decades—like efforts to pass national legislation and to negotiate international agreements—while important, haven’t yet produced the kind of change scientists say is needed to avert climate change’s potential consequences. But there’s at least one reason for optimism. We now have a new—and potentially more effective—way of solving complex global challenges: online crowdsourcing. Millions of people around the world can now work together online to achieve a common goal at a scale and with a degree of collaboration that was never before possible. From … Read More »The post How millions of people can help solve climate change — Thomas W. Malone, Robert Laubacher and Laur Fisher appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

The problem with online ratings — Sinan Aral

From MIT Sloan Management Review Studies show that online ratings are one of the most trusted sources of consumer confidence in e-commerce decisions. But recent research suggests that they are systematically biased and easily manipulated. A few months ago, I stopped in for a quick bite to eat at Dojo, a restaurant in New York City’s Greenwich Village. I had an idea of what I thought of the place. Of course I did — I ate there and experienced it for myself. The food was okay. The service was okay. On average, it was average. So I went to rate the restaurant on Yelp with a strong idea of the star rating I would give it. I logged in, navigated to the page and clicked the button to write the review. I saw that, immediately to the right of where I would “click to rate,” a Yelp user named Shar … Read More »The post The problem with online ratings — Sinan Aral appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

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