Faculty Expertise Guide

When you want information on timely business topics, MIT Sloan School of Management can provide the expertise you need.

Our internationally renowned faculty and research staff explore the world's most critical business problems and share their insightful solutions through dynamic classroom discussions. This guide provides a window on the intellectual vibrancy of MIT Sloan.

The great volume of research conducted at MIT Sloan and the interests of our faculty and researchers continually evolve, so please contact Paul Denning, director of Media Relations, if you don't find what you need.

How IoT changes decision making, security and public policy – Erik Brynjolfsson

We’re in the early stages of a management revolution. The upheaval is based on our unprecedented ability to collect, measure and digitally record information about human and systems activities, particularly with the finely tuned data sets available through IoT. One of the hallmarks of this new era is the acceleration of data-driven decision making within businesses, which has tripled in just five years, according to a recent study I conducted with Kristina McElheren, a professor at University of Toronto. Accompanying the progress anticipated in this increasingly digital age, however, will be thorny challenges and broader issues for society at large. This is particularly true as organizations begin to feed the large data sets available from IoT into systems that use machine-learning algorithms—at which point they will begin making predictions and decisions in an increasingly automated way, and at large scale. Machine-learning and artificial intelligence (AI) technologies have advanced greatly in … Read More »The post How IoT changes decision making, security and public policy – Erik Brynjolfsson appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

Opinion: Brexit could be great for the U.S. – Simon Johnson

From MarketWatch The British vote to leave the European Union has shaken world financial markets. The immediate and medium-term prospects for economic growth in the United Kingdom are severely diminished, and the impact on the rest of Europe will be negative. Some of the obvious political winners from Brexit are people who do not like Western Europe and what it stands for. Ironically, the United States — Europe’s greatest ally and the EU’s largest trading partner — may also end up as a beneficiary, though not if Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican nominee, wins the presidential election in November. Britain has a population of just over 65 million people and what was, at least until Thursday, the world’s fifth-largest national economy, with annual GDP totaling nearly $3 trillion. In the context of a $75 trillion global economy, Britain’s is a relatively small, open one that relies heavily on foreign trade … Read More »The post Opinion: Brexit could be great for the U.S. – Simon Johnson appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

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