Faculty Expertise Guide

When you want information on timely business topics, MIT Sloan School of Management can provide the expertise you need.

Our internationally renowned faculty and research staff explore the world's most critical business problems and share their insightful solutions through dynamic classroom discussions. This guide provides a window on the intellectual vibrancy of MIT Sloan.

The great volume of research conducted at MIT Sloan and the interests of our faculty and researchers continually evolve, so please contact Paul Denning, director of Media Relations, if you don't find what you need.

As You Were Saying … MGH needs checkup for possible ER bottlenecks — Steven J. Spear

From The Boston Herald Five years after a $500 million expansion, Massachusetts General Hospital’s emergency department is again overburdened, in the words of hospital President Peter Slavin with “delays, dissatisfaction, and sometimes even concerns about quality and safety.” Before the public, payers, policymakers and donors get on the hook — again — for more staff and more extraordinarily expensive capital expenditures, let’s ask these questions first. • What’s the mix and volume of patients presenting at the emergency department? • What portion of discharges occur on time, and of the rest, how long are they delayed? • From when a patient first presents in the ED, what’s the lag until that patient is examined and treatment begins, the time from “door to doc?” As to the first question, there are certainly patients with conditions that truly are life- or limb-threatening and arise unexpectedly. Think stroke, heart attack, or aneurysm. However, … Read More » The post As You Were Saying … MGH needs checkup for possible ER bottlenecks — Steven J. Spear appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >

How to improve Boston’s infrastructure future – Venkat Sumantran, Charles Fine, and David Gonsalvez

From the Boston Globe Mayor Marty Walsh and his team deserve a great deal of credit for creating an enlightened, forward-looking vision for Boston’s transportation future. The initiative Go Boston 2030 tackles a key challenge for the city: its aging mobility infrastructure. However, this plan is missing several opportunities to improve the livability of Boston and foster inclusive economic growth. The plan can and should be more ambitious. Changes to the plan are critical, since a city’s mobility architecture can have a huge impact on its economy. Inefficiencies that sap economic growth stem from many sources like loss of productivity of people and assets, air quality remediation costs, reduced attractiveness to businesses, and impact on health. In 2016, Boston’s ranking in the INRIX traffic scorecard, which analyzes the impact of traffic in cities around the world, deteriorated from number 28 to 16 among US cities with the worst traffic congestion. The … Read More » The post How to improve Boston’s infrastructure future – Venkat Sumantran, Charles Fine, and David Gonsalvez appeared first on MIT Sloan Experts.  Read the full post >






 

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